Anger Management Consulting Program Blog on Parents and Anger

Parents are only human and become angry with their children.  Moms can lose their cool and yell and displace anger towards their kids.  These are not uncommon occurrences, so how can moms remain calm and set good examples even on the most frustrating day?

How can parents better control their anger with their kids? Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The article, “Anger Management For Parents (Because We Need It Too)” by Megan Glosson looks how moms and parents in general can be control their anger better with their children.  She states,

“Unfortunately, though, anger isn’t an emotion that’s exclusive to kids — parents feel it too. When unchecked, parental anger can become a household-wide problem that impacts everyone. Therefore, it’s important for parents to not only understand their child’s anger but their own as well. Then, once parents understand anger, they can apply the appropriate anger management strategies to help them cope with strong emotions more effectively.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Anger Management Certification Blog on Regulation of Anger

Children without restraints become wild adults.  It is especially true to help teach children to regulate and control their anger and rage.  They need to learn to realize their emotions have consequences and when living in a society, it is important to act a certain way.

Learning to regulate anger at a early age is critical. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

The article, “Anger Management for Kids: Teaching Emotional Regulation” by Nathan Greene looks into the importance and how to teach children to regulate their emotions.  He states,

“When your child has a temper tantrum — whether at home or in public — it can be startling and disorienting to witness the amount of anger or rage coming from one tiny human. And when those tantrums start happening repeatedly, it can be concerning. You wouldn’t be alone in wondering what’s causing those outbursts, whether you’re reacting to them correctly, or if there is something else you could do to help your child. Anger management techniques, when age-appropriate — which focus on emotional regulation — may help.”

If you wish to read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional programs.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

Anger Management Certification Blog on Unresolved Anger and Forgiveness

In any type of trauma, there is anger.  Anger can continue to feed the trauma and keep it alive longer.  Anger can also weaken the individual overtime through depression, fatigue and anxiety.  Keeping strong emotional anger is unhealthy and it is important to learn how to properly release anger.  This does not mean one does not have a right to be angry over the offense and trauma, but i does mean one must escape the anger before it becomes toxic.

Anger keeps trauma highly charged and weakens the self.  It leads to sarcasm and bitterness in life, as well as resentment and possibly revenge.  Revenge leads to further destruction and a cycle of violence and continued trauma.  Furthermore, anger that prevents forgiveness stunts social growth. It prevents trust, increases hatred and forces oneself to close off to others.  Hence it is important more so for one’s health to resolve anger and forgive than for the lack of worthiness of the offender to receive it.

Unresolved anger can lead to health issues. It is far better to release anger for oneself. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

Many feel forgiveness is impossible.  Perhaps they view the offense as unforgivable.  Rape, molestation and murder are sometimes very hard things to forgive.  These things represent the worst within human society.  Other things may be easier to forgive, but regardless of the degree, if one associates an action as unforgivable, then it becomes an anchor around one’s neck.  Others feel they must protect themselves and must remain bitter and remain closed.  Those who were physically abused, may feel their anger empowers them and protects them from ever being hurt again by never letting someone get close to them.   Others feel they may betray themselves or their loved one, if they forgive the perpetrator.   These are all blocks to resolving unhealthy anger and moving forward in life.

Anger is an emotion that may very well be important to the event.  It is in fact a true emotion in trauma. It is OK to be angry.  It is OK to feel the anger, but eventually, the anger can become toxic.  It is important to start to experience the anger and understand it, but in a way that allows one to remain in touch with its importance but not its ill effects.  It needs to be analyzed free from the toxic charge of initial rage, so one can understand its rationale and comprehend where it is aimed.

In doing so, many times, things need to be said, when those things cannot be said, then it is important to be able to find other ways to release.  This is especially true when justice is not given to a particular case that prevents closure.  Justice is an excellent way to help heal unresolved anger but in so many cases, justice at least in this world is not given.  It is hence critical to be able to resolve anger sometimes without justice.

Some therapists suggest Gestalt Chairs, when one plays the role of both oneself and perpetrator.  This allows the necessary discussion as one plays both roles.  Being able to vocally express anger, confrontation and forgiveness is key.  Furthermore, those with a belief of the afterlife, can find some closure knowing nothing goes unpunished before God.  Ultimately, facing anger, the situation and forgiving, frees oneself from the perpetrator.

Forgiveness, however, does not mean minimizing the event, or condoning it, or forgetting it, or trusting the same person again.  It does not dismiss the event, but it frees oneself from the emotional tie of the perpetrator.  Even if one does not ask, it can free oneself.  Forgiveness does not mean the individual still must pay a debt in this life or the next but it does allow one to move forward.

It is important in some cases to ask for forgiveness, but in other cases, this may not be an option, but the key is to decide to finally heal.  Being able to resolve anger and give forgiveness may have to be done in constructive ways to release.  Gestalt chairs or belief in God may be the best ways to forgive and understand.  One needs to try to forgive the best way they can for their own healing.  Sometimes, this can be accomplished through rituals such as confession, or other forms of expression.

In can sometimes be difficult to give forgiveness. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

Trauma is difficult to overcome.  Some trauma is more severe and some cases of anger are harder to overcome.  It is not an issue of denying the evil that occurred but it is an issue of healing and finding peace for oneself. Holding on to anger does not punish the perpetrator but it punishes the self and allows the perpetrator to continue to hurt the victim.  It is hence important to learn ways to live and forgive before one’s life is totally destroyed.

Please also review AIHCP’s Crisis Intervention Program, Grief Counseling Program, Stress Management Program and Anger Management Certification.  The programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in the above disciplines

 

Source

“The Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Sourcebook” by Glenn R. Schiraldi, PhD

 

Anger Management Consulting Blog on Gaslighting

Gaslighting is perhaps one of the most anger triggering strategy of someone.  Whether in a relationship, politics, or in war, gaslighting purposely denies the obvious and repeats falsehoods.  Any logical or sane individual will feel frustration when confronted with gas lighting.  It is only human to become angry when one is surrounded by lies.  It is important to properly be able to respond to gas lighting without losing one’s cool.  This is the motive of the perpetrator and it is important not to become angry or misused in these cases.

Gaslighting is a form of abuse. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic goals

 

The article, “How to Recognize & Respond to Gaslighting” by Michelle Brooten-Brooks takes a closer look at the nature of gaslighting and how to handle it.  She states,

“Gaslighting is manipulative emotional and psychological abuse that causes a person to question their reality, memories, instincts, and, ultimately, their sanity. A person gaslights to obtain power and control, which are classic elements of abuse. Gaslighting often occurs in an intimate partner relationship.  Read on to learn more about signs, examples, and types of gaslighting, how to respond, and how to get help.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Anger Management Specialist Certification Article on Passive Anger via Silence

While many focus on aggressive anger in Anger Management, many times passive forms of anger and abuse or forgotten.  One such type of passive anger and abuse is referred to as silent treatment.  When used as a way to punish and control, it can be very abusive and a form of misusing the emotion of anger.

The silent treatment is a form of passive anger and emotional abuse. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Specialist Program

 

The article, “Is Silent Treatment a Form of Abuse? Here’s What to Know’ by Kelly Burch looks how the use of ignoring and purposefully not speaking to another person is a form of abuse.  She states,

“When you think of abuse, your mind probably goes immediately to physical violence, yelling, or intimidation. But an abusive relationship can also be silent. Some people use silent treatment abuse to manipulate and control their loved ones. This is a form of emotional abuse.  It’s normal to not want to talk to someone when you are angry or frustrated. In most cases, this happens occasionally and blows over. However, if a person regularly uses the silent treatment to influence or control your behavior, they are being emotionally abusive. “

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Specialist Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management

Anger Management Certification Blog on Displaced Anger in Society

People are throwing their anger at the pandemic or world affairs or political unrest at a variety of other venues.  Whether at home or in traffic, the population is angry and has no place to channel it in a healthy fashion.  This anger is erupting within our society.

Displaced anger is finding places in everyday life. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

The article, “Apodaca: ‘Dysregulated anger’ has us erupting over the smaller things” by Patrice Apodaca looks closer at this displaced anger.  She states,

“People are throwing tantrums at school board meetings, and students are acting up even more than usual. Arguments are breaking out in grocery stores and restaurants over masks, vaccines, empty store shelves and long waits for meals to be delivered by overworked servers. Motorists are blowing a gasket when they see the prices at the pump. Traffic deaths are up, in part, authorities believe, because drivers are behaving more aggressively. Medical workers are regularly harassed and threatened, and flight attendants are forced to show far too many rude and unruly passengers just how secure and snug their seatbelts can get if they won’t voluntarily sit down and shut up.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Anger can spill into so many other facets of life.  It is important to understand the source and properly channel it.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as an Anger Management Consultant.

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on Moving Beyond Anger

Anger is very emotional.  It connects to who we are and it not unnecessarily unhealthy to be angry but it is important to channel it and move beyond it.  It is important to transform your anger into more positive energy that creates the change necessary that caused the anger.  Angry emotions can create a bigger mess than already exists.

Anger Management Groups can help others find ways to transform anger. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “How to Manage and Move Beyond Anger” by Meredith Gordon Resnick looks closer at anger and how to move beyond it.  She states,

“Being in a relationship with your anger is another way of saying being in a relationship with yourself. It means knowing this part of yourself in an intimate way. This is important after any loss. It means getting to know a facet of yourself better.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on Leadership and Anger Management

Learning how to deal with anger of employees and team members and utilize these emotions for the overall good of the team are key in anger management.  Anger Management helps teach managers how to deal with emotion of others in a constructive way that will not harm the team

Anger Management in leadership and the workplace is critical. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “Managing Anger, Frustration, and Resentment on Your Team” by Nihar Chhaya looks at how leaders can control their own anger and their team’s anger.  He states,

“Anger and losing one’s temper in the workplace is nothing new. Many studies show that among all of life’s pressures, job stress is by far the most significant source. In addition, recent research from Gallup reported that daily rates of anger, stress, worry, and sadness among American workers have risen over the past decade.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Anger Management Training Program Blog on Child Anger

Children need to learn at a young age to control anger.  Children have untamed impulses and those impulses need restrained.  Children also need good example and keeping a cool demeanor can set a good example to children.  Anger control is a life long skill and it needs to start very young.

Dealing with angry children can be a challenge. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your goals

 

The article, “Child-anger-management-how-to-deal-with-explosive-behavior-of-kids” by Parvin Aktor looks more closely at helping children control their temper.  He reminds everyone that how a parent reprimands is also important in training children how to behave.  Being calm and awarding good behavior and punishing bad behavior through modification and not violence or swearing are key he states.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Training Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

 

Anger Management Specialist Program Blog on Dangers of Anger

Anger can become a tool of one’s own undoing if not properly managed.  Too many individuals give into anger and hurt others and face criminal charges, while others only hurt themselves by stressing their bodies through the stages of anger.  It is important to learn to manage anger the same way one manages stress.

Anger can become dangerous if not controlled. Please also review AIHCPs’ Anger Management Specialist Program

 

The article, “The Dangers of Anger” by Scott Butwell looks at the dangers of anger and how to better manage and control it. He states,

“Anger can be a destructive emotional cocktail. There is anger mixed with anxiety, anger tinged with stress, anger boiling over with resentment.  There are thousands of different kinds of anger.  Anger can destroy relationships, eat you alive by turning into resentment, and you can become easily addicted to anger like drugs or alcohol.  Anger can be passed on from one generation to the next, and if you think you don’t struggle with it, depression is often suppressed anger. Maybe, you bottle up your anger — like me.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Specialist Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Training