Anger Management Training Article on Anger Management

Anger Management is key in helping others control anger.  One of the big things is understanding the meaning and intent of others.  When they are misunderstood, anger can erupt and cause issues in all aspects of life.

Interpreting why someone responds a way is better than emotionally reacting without thought. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Training Program

 

The article, “How to Rethink and Manage Anger” by Ilene Strauss Cohen looks at how anger should be understood and how to avoid triggering it.  The article states,

“When people respond to situations with anger, there’s usually more to the story. Behind their rage is a fear of being hurt, a fear of not being able to stand up for themselves, or a fear of unjust or unfair things happening. These are all understandable feelings. And anger is also appropriate in many situations. The experience of anger isn’t wrong; it is when we express that anger in negative ways that it can be harmful to our lives. ”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Training and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The Anger Management Program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four certification in Anger Management

 

Anger Management Training Program Article on Controlling Anger at Work

Anger can become a big issue at work.  It is important to keep work safe and not intimidating to others as well as protect oneself.  Anger however rarely listens to reason and it is important to be able to control anger, understand it and not allow it to interfere at work.

Anger at work is a big social problem. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Training Program

 

The article, “How to manage your anger and frustration at work” by Nurhurda Syed explains why it is important to control anger at work and how to better cope with it.  The article states,

“It’s a difficult time to be a leader and it’s okay if things are starting to get to you, professionally or personally. The best way to manage your anger or frustration at work is through some self-awareness and honesty, said Maria Micha, a clinical mental health counsellor, psychiatrist and corporate trainer. If you feel like you’re losing grip of a situation at work, take the time to reflect on your life and the issues you’re handling.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Training Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

 

Anger Management Consulting Article on Mental Health and Aggression

Over aggression is a sign sometimes for deeper issues.  Personality disorders, trauma, oppositional defiance and manic episodes can all emerge through aggression.

Aggression has many deeper causes with mental health. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The article,  “Aggression is a Sign of Many Mental Health Conditions
” by Marie Miguel looks at how aggression can sometimes be a a sign of a far deeper issue.  She states,

“Aggression can be an intense feeling and a hard one to manage. It’s challenging for the person who’s aggressive and frightening for the individuals around them. A person who struggles with aggression may feel out of control. They may be worried they will lose their temper and get verbally aggressive or even physically violent. The reality is that aggression isn’t something that stands alone. People with aggressive behavior are suffering from a variety of different mental health issues.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Diagnosing why one is struggling with anger and aggression is critical not only to mental health but also in maintaining relationships and careers.

Please also review the Anger Management Consulting Program offered by AIHCP and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and is designed for qualified professionals seeking  a four year Anger Management Consulting Program.

Anger Management Program Article on Frustrated Employees

It is bad enough when a pandemic causes enormous stress on employees, whether working in the office under safety guidelines or working through the obstacles of home, but it when the basic stresses of the job bury employees, it can even become worse.  Employers need to be able to identify issues for employees by making work and the work place as least stressful as possible.  Much of this has to do with how employers interact with their employees and respect them, as well as supplying them with the supplies and time they need to succeed.

Employers need to be able to identify frustration and keep the work place conducive for employees. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Program

 

The article, “How to deal with frustrated employees” by Nurhurda Sayed looks at how employees can help frustrated employees succeed.  The article states,

“So what can leaders do to manage these angry employees? If a blow out happens during a meeting, Micha suggested that leaders give some extra attention to the worker and say, “hey, I would like to know more about the root cause of your emotions. I’m happy to hear you out”. This personal conversation can be held after the team meeting and you can still retain a professional tone during the chat.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review both AIHCP’s Stress Management and Anger Management Program and see if they match your academic and professional goals.  The programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking four year certifications in both Stress Management and Anger Management

Anger Management Consulting Program Article on Exercise and Anger

When stressed and we become angry, we usually seek to fight or maybe even flee.  These are our basic instincts.  When we are unable to allow emotion to burst out, and due to social graces, are forced to restrain ourselves, our body internally suffers.  We cannot yell and scream or hit someone when angry, but later we can release the natural emotion and energy through exercise.  Certain exercises can reduce stress and anger.

Exercise can help reduce rage and anger. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

 

The article, “Does exercise help with anger? This is how a workout can release frustration” by Chloe Gray looks at how we can utilize healthy exercise to deal with unresolved anger.  She states,

“The fact that there is a positive outlet for this anger is great news that is scientifically backed. In a study of 3,403 participants by Stockholm University, people who exercised at least two to three times a week were found to experience significantly less depression, anger, cynical distrust and stress. As well as having long term effects on our emotions, exercise can immediately impact our anger too: a 2016 study by the German Sport University in Cologne found a significant reduction of aggressive feelings after both rowing and combat exercise.”

To read the entire article, please click here 

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program.  The program is for qualified professionals seeking training in Anger Management

 

Anger Management Consulting Article on Anger and Kids

Children need to learn at a young age how to control emotions, especially anger.  A child who does not learn to control anger can become a destructive adult with numerous issues with the law and society.  Hence an important aspect of parenting is properly teaching a child how to control anger.  Sometimes reprimands need to be more strict but there are also  numerous other ways to teach a child coping mechanisms to control anger.

How do we teach children how to properly deal with anger? Many children mimic poor parental behaviors. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The article, “:Anger Management for Kids: 7 Healthy Ways to Deal with Explosive Feelings” by Emma Singer looks at how children can learn how to cope with their anger.  She states,

“When you’re dealing with an angry kid, it can be hard for even the most even-keeled parents to keep their cool as things start to spiral out of control. And on some level, you kind of get where they’re coming from. Adults are able to maintain at least a modicum of composure when mad, thanks to years of practice at recognizing and coping with the familiar feeling.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Anger Management Consulting Program Article on Covid Rage

Basic anger management techniques are important especially in stressed areas.  Covid-19 enraged areas over mask use is a big issue between those who wear and those who do not.  Anger and fights and sometimes death occur in these confrontations.  This is why it is so important to utilize anger management in these cases.

Managing anger is important during mask laws and Covid-19. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The article, “Managing Anger: Real Steps To Stop The COVID Rage” by Elizabeth Broadbent reviews how we can better control our anger.  She states,

“Managing anger means noticing and naming it in the moment, and when I see people moving into my space or not wearing a mask, I feel angry. I am personally offended. I can name it now. I don’t excuse it or hide it or justify it. I feel angry. And I also recognize that it’s okay to be angry. Anger is a feeling. We can control how we act. We can’t control how we feel.  In other words, I can name my feeling. But that feeling doesn’t give me a right to act out.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and qualified professionals can earn a four year certification.

Anger Management Consulting Training Article on Anger and Health

It has long been accepted fact that stress and anger are bad for one’s health when they are not properly channeled and coped with.  Individuals who allow stress and anger to overtake cause bodily reactions to take place in the body to prepare the body for confrontation.  Overtime, this can be unhealthy and cause multiple health issues for the person

Anger can negatively affect one’s health. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The article, “Too Much Anger Leads to Bad Health Outcomes” by Philip Chard looks at how anger when it is not expressed or coped with properly can lead to later health issues.  He states,

The damage from this sort of mental bile is routinely underestimated. Studies show emotional agitation, particularly the angry variety, instigates several unwelcome health impacts. For one, the next time you “lose it,” your immune system will be compromised for roughly four hours, leaving you more susceptible to illness. That’s no small vulnerability in our COVID-saturated world. What’s more, persistent agitation increases the risk of strokes, heart disease and early death. Also, these caustic feelings corrode mental well-being, sometimes leading to a nasty condition called “agitated depression.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Stress Management and Anger Management can help one understand the profound effects on the body due to emotional distress and help teach individuals how to better identify stressors and agitations and learn how to better react to them.  It is important for good health, to limit emotional distress and keep the body healthy.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and designed for working qualified professionals seeking Anger Management Training

Anger Management Certification Article on Conflict Resolution

Stressors and change create grief and anger.  How we manage our anger and grief in relationship to stressors with other people is critical to our social interaction with others.  For better communication, health and better social relationships, conflict resolution is critical.

Conflict resolution involves better communication skills, control of emotion due to stress and loss, patience and understanding.  In conflict resolution, stress management and anger management classes, individuals need to identify what type of behavior their possess in their interaction with other people.

Conflict resolution brings out a peaceful but effective solution for two differing parties
Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

Assertive behaviors are the healthiest of the behaviors.  They establish boundaries, respect self, respect the other person, and meet one’s needs in a healthy way.   Non assertive behaviors on the other hand deny the wishes and needs of self at the expense of others.  There is a lack of boundaries and ability to respect one self over the needs of others.

Aggressive behavior is a selfish behavior.  It turns to conflict when establishing boundaries and the needs of others.  It does not respect the needs of others nor the feelings of others when establishing itself in a conflict.

For example, an assertive behavior at a restaurant would return an ordered item that was ill prepared.  It would so in a civil and polite way, describing the issues and find resolution.  A non-assertive behavior would meekly accept the discrepancy in the order and say nothing for fear of causing a scene.  An aggressive behavior would demand the order be fixed without politeness and be filled with a litany of insults

Obviously, assertive behavior is the most social, healthy, and effective behaviors during conflict.  They meet the need of the person but also find resolution in a polite and effective way.  One can be assertive through non verbal clues, or verbal clues.  How one stands, speaks in tone, and looks at a person are parts of an assertive personality.  They lack dismissive behaviors or aggressive and angry body movements.

Verbally, an assertive behavior communicates.  They describe the issue, express feelings, specify what is needed, and refer to consequences.  In doing so, obviously, listening is also key but also elaborating on one’s needs is also key.  How we communicate is key to reducing anger, stress, anxiety and violence.

It is important when resolving conflicts to use specific types of words.   The words “And” and but” are important ways to express conflict.  Instead of eliminating the feelings of others via the word “but “it is better to include the word “and” as a way to address and not eliminate another’s point of view.

Another verbal cue in resolving conflicts is to avoid the pronoun “you” when addressing someone else. Instead, use the pronoun “I” as not to be accusatory towards another person when pointing something out.  As with “you”, avoid direct accusatory words such as “why” which can force a person with an opposing view on the defensive.

How we communicate via speech is key to resolving conflict.

 

If one incorporates understanding, patience, and kindness with an assertive personality, they can better communicate and address conflict issues that emerge due to anger and stress.  It is imperative to be able to communicate and resolve issues of conflict in a civil but effective way.  It is not only socially better but also best for health and wellbeing.  The less conflict, the less stress, anxiety and anger

Please also review AIHCP’s Stress Management Consulting Program as well as AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  Qualified professionals can earn a four-year certification and help others deal with stress and anger through successful conflict resolution

Anger Management Consulting Certification Article on Controlling Words

Many times people say things in anger they regret.  Words can damage relationships permanently.  It is important to watch one’s tongue when in anger and never allow emotion to get the best of oneself when dealing with other people.  Learning to what to say when angry is critical.  It is a life skill that can help one stay out of trouble and not hurt family and friends.

It is sometimes best to talk when angry after reflection. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

The article, “The Thing To Say Every Time You’re Angry” by Laura Vanderkam looks into what is best to say when anger overtakes.  She states,

“In this angry, anxious, and polarized time, it’s easy to lash out, whether on social media or at people in your real life. And we often end up wishing we didn’t:One survey found that a majority of social media users had posted something they regretted.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Learning to avoid the conflict with immediate verbal slashes is critical to good relationships with others. Learning how to walk away and say what gives you more time to reflect is key to not allowing emotion to dictate words you may later regret.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification.  Qualified professionals can learn how to help others how to manage their emotions and control anger.