The Benefits of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for PTSD

Person in military uniform holding a sign that reads PTSDWritten by Claire Szewczyk

 

The first time that Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) reached the public eye, it was known as the concept of “shell shock” – debilitating nightmares, hyper-reactivity and increased dangerous behaviors in veterans who had experienced traumas of combat during World War I. It is still very much a common diagnosis amongst the veteran community, with an incidence of almost 13% (PTSD and veterans: Breaking down the statistics 2021).

However, in more recent years, PTSD has been a more commonly diagnosed mental health disorder that can affect anyone who was exposed to any form of abuse, trauma, or life-threatening situation.

As a result of PTSD becoming more of a common occurrence among the population, it has also become more important for those who are experiencing symptoms to seek out treatment. There are a wide variety of options available, including the tried and true, research-verified effective Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT. 

CBT focuses on the relationship among thoughts, feelings and behaviors, targets current problems and symptoms, and then focuses on changing patterns of behavior that lead to difficulty functioning. 

 

What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that can develop after a person has experienced or witnessed a traumatic event, such as a combat event, a natural disaster, a car accident, or a violent crime. 

Symptoms of PTSD include re-experiencing the traumatic event through flashbacks or nightmares, avoidance of reminders of the event, and increased feelings of anxiety and depression.

Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulties with adjusting and coping, but with good self-care practices and time, they usually are able to overcome it. If symptoms worsen, linger and interfere with day-to-day functioning, they might be experiencing PTSD.

Getting effective treatment after PTSD symptoms develop can be critical to reducing symptoms and improving overall function. 

 

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)?

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy focuses on the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. It targets individuals’ current concerns and issues with day-to-day-functioning and the symptoms they are experiencing, and then provides ways to help challenge negative patterns of thought and behavior, in order to help improve quality of life.

 

How does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Help PTSD Symptoms?

Several theories that revolve around trauma help explain why CBT is an effective treatment to reduce symptoms of PTSD.

Emotional Processing Theory suggests those who have experienced a traumatic event can develop associations with reminders of the event. Challenging these associations, especially the ones that lead to unhealthy functioning, is the core of emotional processing.

Social Cognitive Theory suggests that those who have defined their existing beliefs about themselves, others, and the world, based on the trauma they experienced, often struggle with unhelpful interpretations of their experiences of their environment. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has been scientifically proven through many studies, to alleviate symptoms of PTSD. Typically, CBT treatment includes two main components: exposure therapy and cognitive restructuring. 

A man in military uniform in therapy. Exposure Therapy 

Exposure Therapy aims to reduce the emotional distress associated with reminders of the triggering event. Exposure Therapy operates similarly to how it sounds. It involves gradually exposing the individual to reminders of the traumatic event in a controlled and safe environment. 

If you go through Exposure Therapy you may be asked to recall the traumatic event in therapy, visit places, or engage in activities that are associated with the traumatic event. Over time, the hope is that you will be able to identify your triggers and use coping mechanisms to downplay the symptoms you experience (Yetman, Exposure therapy: Types, how it’s done, and more 2021).

Cognitive Restructuring or Prolonged Exposure (PE) Therapy 

The second aspect of CBT is Cognitive Restructuring or Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE). PE is a type of CBT treatment that involves identifying and changing negative thought patterns associated with the traumatic event (Prolonged exposure (PE).

Cognitive restructuring may include challenging and refuting negative beliefs about oneself, the world, and others developed due to the traumatic event. 

For example, a person with PTSD may believe that the world is dangerous and that they are helpless to protect themselves, which can lead to anxiety and fear. 

Through Cognitive restructuring, a therapist may help the person to challenge and refute this belief and replace it with a more balanced and realistic perspective.

 

CBT is a scientifically proven effective treatment for PTSD

CBT is effective in treating PTSD in several studies. CBT was found to be effective in reducing symptoms of PTSD in adults in over 12-15 sessions either in a group setting or one-on-one.

CBT has also been effective in treating PTSD in specific populations, including veterans and individuals who have experienced a traumatic event in childhood. The VA and the American Psychological Association recommend using CBT for PTSD survivors. CBT not only targets PTSD but also targets other symptoms of PTSD such as depression and anxiety.

Multiple studies through the years have championed CBT for PTSD treatment. (Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treatment of PTSD).

 

What are the Benefits of CBT?

Besides the fact that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a scientifically proven effective treatment for individuals suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, there’s also a wide variety of benefits over other forms of therapy. Here’s a few of them:

 

     1. It gives people hope about their condition.

Oftentimes, due to the nature of mental health disorders, sometimes it can cause those who have been diagnosed to have a pessimistic outlook about their future wellbeing. It can be difficult to think about a time where their illness won’t impact their life.

CBT challenges this mindset–and offers hope for the future.

It does this by using its own methods to challenge thoughts and ideas like this. Provides a way to seek out alternative possibilities. That life could be very different, and in a more positive way.

 

     2. It develops self-esteem.

It’s not a surprise to note that with many mental health conditions, also comes with a lower sense of self-worth and self-esteem.

This feeds into the cycle of negative thinking, which influences behaviors, and vice versa.

CBT can help disrupt these negative thoughts and patterns, and as a result, help develop more confidence in a person’s own abilities and strengths. 

Understanding how thoughts work, and how they are under the control of those who are thinking them, changes things on a fundamental level. Including the way people see themselves.

 

     3. It can help with relaxation.

Because CBT directly helps with managing thoughts and emotions, this comes with it the ability to control how a person responds to their symptoms.

As a result, it helps regulate responses to triggers and reduce symptoms by utilizing a variety of relaxation techniques.

 

     4. It develops more rational thought processes.

Perhaps the most important benefit of CBT, is that it helps people regain control of their thoughts and emotions. 

Over time, the process of questioning and challenging our thought processes, and replacing them with healthier ones, can transform people entirely.

 

CBT is a great way to treat PTSD

In conclusion, CBT is a widely recognized and effective treatment for PTSD. This type of therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interconnected and that we can change our emotional response to a traumatic event by changing our thoughts and behaviors. 

Through exposure therapy and cognitive restructuring, CBT can help individuals reduce symptoms of PTSD, such as re-experiencing the traumatic event, avoiding reminders of the event, and decreasing feelings of anxiety and depression. 

 

Claire Szewczyk Bio PicAuthor Bio:

Claire Szewczyk is a Digital Content Coordinator for Hill & Ponton, PA in Florida. She was a former US Airforce civilian employee, who worked at Hill Air Force Base, in Layton, UT as a flight testing administrator. She has also spent several years working with the Department of Veterans Affairs audiology programs in Salt Lake City, UT and Pocatello, ID. She enjoys working with the Veteran population and keeping them up to date with information they need the most.

 

 

 

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Specialist Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Counseling.

 

References

American Psychological Association. (n.d.). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treatment of PTSD. American Psychological Association. Retrieved January 30, 2023, from https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/cognitive-behavioral-therapy

American Psychological Association. (n.d.). Prolonged exposure (PE). American Psychological Association. Retrieved January 30, 2023, from https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/prolonged-exposure

Emotional processing theory (EPT) and exposure therapy for … – springer. SpringerLink. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2023, from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10879-006-9008-y

PTSD and veterans: Breaking down the statistics. Hill & Ponton, P.A. (2021, May 11). Retrieved January 30, 2023, from https://www.hillandponton.com/veterans-statistics/ptsd/

Yetman, D. (2021, June 21). Exposure therapy: Types, how it’s done, and more. Healthline. Retrieved January 30, 2023, from https://www.healthline.com/health/exposure-therapy#:~:text=Exposure%20therapy%20is%20a%20kind,therapist%20in%20a%20safe%20environment. 

Anger Management and Controlling a Temper

Losing one’s temper can be in the moment due to a bad day but it could also be a habit due to past trauma and issues.  The ability to communicate with one’s subconscious at a more clear level can help an individual cope and deal with unpleasantries throughout the day in a more calm manner.  Rapid Transformational Therapy looks to help individuals talk more with their subconscious and understand why tempers can flare and how to control those tempers better.

Losing one’s temper should never be an option even if in the right. Control of one’s temper is a life skill one can work on with anger management

 

 

Anger Management and Rapid Transformational Therapy can help an individuals identify their anger source and also find ways to better cope with the anger by releasing whatever is holding one hostage to anger.  The article, “Lose Your Temper Often? Learn How to Get that Monster in Control” by

“RTT helps you transform your negative beliefs about yourself, such as ‘I can’t cope’, into better ones that serve you, like ‘I can overcome any challenges that I face’. Programming this positive story into your mind will make huge shifts in your reaction — you will start to react more and more from a place of strength and confidence. This shift will, as a consequence, start to positively impact your relationships. RTT can help you gain the control you need to approach the same situation differently. Once you change your mindset, you will change your reality.”

“Lose Your Temper Often? Learn How to Get that Monster in Control”.

To learn more about controlling your temper and to read the full article, please click here

Commentary

The causes of a temper can be multifaceted and are likely contingent on an individual’s physiological, psychological, and environmental factors. For example, a person may have an increased propensity for outbursts due to a genetic predisposition towards emotional instability or impulsivity. Additionally, psychosocial stressors such as interpersonal conflict or economic insecurity can contribute to the development of a temper.  Cognitively, a temper may result from the individual’s appraisal of a situation as threatening or frustrating and their subsequent decision to engage in aggressive behavior as an adaptive coping strategy in order to restore their sense of control. Emotionally, anger is often caused by perceived injustice or violation of personal values and beliefs.

Anger in itself is not bad but when misused or allowed to take control of a situation then it can become dangerous to everyone involved.  It is hence important to utilize Anger Management techniques.  Controlling one’s temper is key and important to a healthier life style.  Controlling one’s temper is an integral part of self-regulation, as it involves the ability to inhibit impulsivity and channel emotional reactions in a constructive way. It requires individuals to be aware of their visceral reactions, recognize the emotions behind them, and attempt to modulate these affective states in order to maintain composure. This process necessitates a degree of cognitive control, whereby conscious thought can override automatic responses and facilitate more appropriate behavior.

Controlling one’s temper can be achieved through a variety of techniques, such as cognitive reappraisal or emotion regulation strategies. Cognitive reappraisal involves the conscious reframing of situations in order to reduce emotional arousal and diminish the likelihood of an outburst. Additionally, emotion regulation strategies involve techniques such as distraction, relaxation, and mindfulness that help to reorient attention away from anger-provoking stimuli.  Cognitive restructuring involves examining one’s beliefs about the situation that has caused their temper to flare up and assessing whether those beliefs are realistic and helpful. Mindfulness involves becoming aware of one’s emotions and thoughts without attempting to suppress or judge them; instead, an individual is encouraged to observe them from a non-judgmental stance.

Anger Management 

AIHCP offers a four year Anger Management Consulting certification for qualified professionals seeking education and background in the field

 

In trying to control a temper, Anger Management can help provide insight and skills to manage one’s temper.  While one may have a right no be angry, one never has a right to lose control.  Anger Management can help individuals control a temper and live a better life.

Anger management techniques refer to a suite of approaches for modulating emotion regulation, with the ultimate aim of mitigating maladaptive reactive behaviors. These techniques may include cognitive restructuring, somatic techniques, problem solving strategies and emotional regulation strategies. Cognitive restructuring involves identifying irrational cognitions associated with anger and replacing them with more adaptive thoughts. Somatic techniques involve using physical sensations to reduce emotional arousal such as deep breathing or relaxation exercises.

Conclusion

In conclusion, controlling our temper is an important life skill that we can all benefit from. Through practice, patience and understanding, anyone can learn to manage their anger. Taking the time to reflect on a situation before responding and learning to express emotions in a healthy way can help us develop better relationships with others, as well as ourselves. Moreover, it can make all aspects of life more enjoyable and meaningful, as we free ourselves from negative thoughts and feelings of anger. In addition, Anger management is an important skill for everyone. It takes effort and practice, but the results are well worth it. Improved relationships, better physical health, and increased mental clarity are just a few of the benefits that come from mastering this tool. Additionally, with repeated practice, anger management skills can become automatic responses to difficult situations. This means less time wasted thinking about how to respond and more time spent managing emotions in a healthy way.
Those trained in Anger Management can help individuals utilize various techniques and skills to handle stressful situations and deal with anger in a constructive way.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.
Additional Resources
“Control anger before it controls you”. APA. March 3rd, 2022. APA. Access here
“11 Anger Management Strategies to Help You Calm Down”. Amy Morin.  November 30th, 2022. VeryWellMind. Access here
“How to Control Anger: 25 Tips to Help You Stay Calm”. Kimberly Holland.  January 29th, 2019. Healthline.  Access here
“How to Own Your Short Temper and Stay in Control”. Cindy Lamothe.  January 29th, 2020. Healthline. Access here

The Emotion of Anger and Controlling It

Anger is a human emotion and hence neutral in regards to being bad or good.  It is a natural response to injustice and frustration of achieving an end.   Intent and how it is unleashed, combined with if it is controlled or uncontrolled all play roles in assigning if it is bad or good.  Regardless, too much anger can be harmful to the body and it is good to learn to properly process it safely.  Anger that is not processed properly can be destructive and full of vice as well as unhealthy over long period of times.  It can destroy lives, families, careers and end up resulting in crime and prison.

Uncontrolled anger can rip apart lives, families, careers and lead to incarceration. Please review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

Anger Management is hence an important life skill.  Properly channeling anger is key to a successful life. Anger Management teaches individuals how to identify anger triggers and properly cope with the emotion.  Those who have issues controlling anger should find counseling help in the field to learn techniques to better control anger.

The article, “A Guide to Anger Issues” by Mandy Baker looks at anger itself and presents a comprehensive guide to understanding it.  She discusses causes and symptoms of anger, as well as types of anger and where it is directed.  Most importantly, she points out the importance of Anger Management and the types of training one can utilize to better control anger.  She states,

“Anger is a natural human emotion. However, when anger is uncontrolled, it can become an issue. It can cause issues with your overall physical and mental health and daily life.  Signs of anger issues include regularly expressing your anger in unhelpful or destructive ways and anger being your standard emotion.  You can manage anger by getting regular exercise and learning relaxation techniques. However, if you still feel your anger may be becoming an issue, contact your doctor or mental health professional. There are therapies and training to help you manage and overcome anger issues.”

“A Guide to Anger Issues”. Mandy Baker. November 16th, 2022. HealthGrades

To review the entire article, please click here

Commentary

Anger is a powerful emotion that can have both positive and negative effects on our lives. It can help us take action, stand up for ourselves, and protect those around us. On the other hand, anger can be destructive, leading to destructive behavior, resentment, and even violence. That’s why it’s important to learn how to manage anger and find healthy ways to express it. In this article, we’ll explore the benefits of anger management, how to identify emotions and triggers, and techniques for controlling your anger.

Introduction to Anger Management

Anger Management can help curb unhealthy angry outbursts and help one live a more healthy and peaceful life.

 

Anger management is a set of skills and strategies designed to help people better understand their emotions and how to manage them in a healthy way. It involves learning to recognize and express anger, as well as understanding the causes and triggers of anger. It also involves understanding the consequences of our behavior and learning to manage our responses in positive ways.

The goal of anger management is not to suppress or deny our feelings, but to learn to express them in a safe and constructive way. It’s not about avoiding anger entirely, but rather about understanding it, managing it, and using it in a positive way.  It is especially important to manage one’s anger when on the road, at work, or when around others.  Accidents, fights and physical injuries can all result from allowing anger to gain the upper hand over someone.

Benefits of Anger Management

The benefits of anger management are numerous. It can help improve communication, relationships, and overall quality of life. It can help you manage stress, tension, and frustration in a more effective way. It can also help you make better decisions, handle difficult conversations, and resolve conflicts more effectively.

Additionally, anger management can help you to better understand your triggers and how to manage them. It can also help you identify and work through underlying issues, such as feeling overwhelmed, anxious, or lonely. Finally, it can help you develop healthier coping mechanisms and find healthier outlets for your emotions.

Identifying Emotions and Triggers

The first step in mastering your emotions is to identify and understand what triggers your anger. This involves looking at the situations, people, and events that lead to anger and identifying the underlying emotions. It’s important to understand what triggers your anger, as this can help you manage it more effectively.

Once you have identified your triggers, you can start to recognize the emotions they trigger. This could include things like feeling disrespected, frustrated, or overwhelmed. It’s important to recognize these feelings and not try to ignore them. Once you have identified and accepted the emotions, you can start to look for healthier ways to manage and express them.

Ways to Manage Stress and Anxiety

Stress and anxiety can often lead to anger, so it’s important to learn how to manage these emotions. Exercise and mindfulness can both be effective tools for managing stress and anxiety. Exercise can help to reduce tension, release endorphins, and improve overall mood. Mindfulness can help to keep you grounded in the present moment and can help to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety.

It’s also important to get adequate rest and practice self-care. Taking time for yourself can help to reduce stress and give you the energy and focus to better manage your emotions. Finding healthy outlets for your emotions, such as art, music, or writing, can also be beneficial.

Techniques for Controlling Your Anger

Once you have identified your triggers and emotions, you can start to develop strategies for controlling your anger. This could include taking a few deep breaths and counting to ten. It could also involve walking away from the situation and focusing on calming activities, such as listening to music or taking a hot bath.

It’s also important to practice self-talk and positive affirmations. This could involve telling yourself, “I can handle this,” or “I can find a better way to handle this.” It’s also important to recognize that it’s okay to feel angry, but to learn how to express it in healthier ways.

Practical Steps for Managing Your Anger

Once you have identified your triggers and emotions, and have developed techniques for controlling your anger, you can start to take practical steps for managing your anger. This could include taking a break from the situation and finding a quiet place to calm down. It could also involve engaging in calming activities, such as going for a walk or listening to music.

It’s also important to practice communication techniques, such as active listening. This involves repeating back what the other person is saying and asking questions to better understand their perspective. It’s also important to take responsibility for your own actions and try to compromise when possible.

How to Avoid Anger Outbursts

Outbursts of anger can be damaging to relationships and can lead to destructive behavior. That’s why it’s important to learn how to avoid anger outbursts. This could involve recognizing when you are getting angry and taking a few deep breaths to calm down. It could also involve being mindful of your emotions and finding healthier outlets for your anger.

It’s also important to practice communication techniques such as active listening. This involves repeating back what the other person is saying and asking questions to better understand their perspective. Additionally, it’s important to take responsibility for your own actions and try to compromise when possible.

Professional Help for Anger Management

Certified Anger Management Consultants can help individuals learn about anger and how to better cope and control it in everyday life.

 

When anger is out of control, it’s important to seek professional help. A licensed mental health professional can provide guidance and support to help you learn how to better manage your anger. They can help you identify triggers and underlying emotions and work with you to develop strategies for managing your anger.

Additionally, a mental health professional can provide guidance on how to avoid anger outbursts and how to practice communication techniques. They can also help you develop a healthier relationship with anger and learn how to use it in a constructive way.

Developing a Healthy Relationship with Anger

The goal of anger management is not to suppress or deny our feelings, but to learn to express them in a safe and constructive way. It’s important to recognize that anger is a natural emotion and that it’s okay to feel angry. It’s also important to recognize that anger can be used in positive ways, such as standing up for yourself or taking action.

It’s also important to remember that anger is only one emotion and that there are other emotions, such as joy, love, and peace. It’s important to take time to recognize and appreciate these other emotions and to focus on building a healthy relationship with anger.

Conclusion

Anger is a powerful emotion that can have both positive and negative effects on our lives. That’s why it’s important to learn how to manage anger and find healthy ways to express it. In this article, we explored the benefits of anger management, how to identify emotions and triggers, and techniques for controlling your anger. We also explored practical steps for managing your anger, how to avoid anger outbursts, and the importance of seeking professional help. Finally, we discussed the importance of developing a healthy relationship with anger and how to use it in a constructive way.

By learning how to manage our emotions, we can create healthier relationships, reduce stress, and improve our overall quality of life. We can also learn how to use our emotions in a positive way and create a healthier relationship with anger.

If you’re struggling with anger and need help managing it, don’t hesitate to reach out to a mental health professional. They can provide guidance and support to help you learn how to better manage your anger and create a healthier relationship with it.

AIHCP offers an Anger Management Consulting Certification for professionals seeking training in helping others control anger.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.  Please review the program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Additional Resources

“Control anger before it controls you”. American Psychological Association. March 3rd, 2022. Access here

“Anger”. Psychology Today Staff. Psychology Today.  Access here

“Anger”. Wikipedia. Access here

“Anger management: 10 tips to tame your temper”. Mayo Clinic Staff. Mayo Clinic.  Access here

“Do I Have Anger Issues? How to Identify and Treat an Angry Outlook”. Adrienne Santos. March 9th, 2021. Healthline. Access here

Video on Anger Management and Road Rage

One place where one needs to control anger is behind the wheel of a car.  There may no more dangerous place than to lose one’s temper while driving.  Accidents, road rage, and even death can occur due to one’s inability to control anger when driving.  It is important to understand that one should never drive when angry or if they feel angry to find a spot to pull over.

Too many times, anger is triggered by aggressive driving or improper adherence to rules.  It is important to drive defensively and to also practice anger management while driving.  In doing so, individuals can be safer on the road and limit unneeded collisions and death.  The video below reviews some basic ways to prevent road rage, handle emotion while driving and defensive driving strategies.

Driving is not the place to become angry. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification.

 

 

Please also review the video below

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on Cold Repressed Anger

Cold or repressed anger lingers.  When individuals do not in a healthy way express anger or situations, then other passive ways of aggression can emerge.  Anger is a healthy emotion when properly channeled and it is important to communicate anger in a good and safe way to others.  When anger is allowed and permitted to linger it can lead to bigger problems and issues later down the road.

It is important to communicate anger in a healthy way. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

The article,”Speaking Up When Most Stressed” by Lorlan Oberlin discusses why it is important to communicate and speak when stressed and not to let it sit within.  She states,

“Build an emotional vocabulary to label negative emotions. This removes the fear of expressing yourself. Find feeling charts/wheels online through an image search. List words using a thesaurus. Choose the precise feeling word which may reveal vulnerability. That’s okay. Opening up and being vulnerable leads to deeper interpersonal connection and intimacy for romantic relationships.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Yoga, Meditation and Anger Management

Controlling anger is key to a healthier life style.  Allowing the actions of others to hurt our own mental and physical health can cause stress and disharmony in the body.  Anger management can help oneself find the ability to better acknowledge anger triggers as well as to better cope with the emotional eruption.  Yoga is one way to learn better ways to cope with anger and control emotion. Yoga is easy to learn and a great way to let off frustration and find inner peace.  There are numerous poses in yoga that can aid an individual in dealing with angry emotions.

The article, “Yoga for anger management: 5 poses to break free” by Anujj Trehaan discusses the various poses one can utilize in yoga to combat anger.  She lists numerous poses from Balasana to Sukhusana.  She also encourages Savasana, Matsyasana, and Uttanasana as important poses.  The article explains the purpose of each pose and how the poses help one better cope with anger.  She states,

Yoga can play an important role in anger management, as well as with stress management in one’s daily life and existence.  Various Yoga poses are also directly correlated with managing anger

 

“It is natural to feel anger but not when it starts getting the better of you.Anger is a powerful emotion and probably the only one that hurts us more than it may hurt someone else.If you find yourself in an unbreakable loop of rage and resentment, we have got your back.Go ahead and try these five yoga poses for anger management.”

“Yoga for anger management: 5 poses to break free”. Anujj Trehaan. October 23rd, 2022. NewsBytes.

To read the entire article, please click here

Commentary

When it comes to yoga and anger, there are a few things to consider. For one, anger is often seen as an emotion that needs to be released in order to achieve inner peace. However, yoga teaches us that all emotions should be experienced and then let go of. This can be difficult to do with something as powerful as anger. But if we can learn to experience anger without letting it take over, we can find a balance between the two extremes.

Yoga and meditation can play key roles in reducing stress and anger in life.  They can prevent the sympathetic nervous system from overwhelming the body and keeping the body in a constant state of fight or flight.  It can also help the body find relaxation and reverse it through the para sympathetic nervous system.  This deactivates many of the hormones and the prepare the body for fight or flight and all the emotions that are tied to this response.

Types of Poses for Anger Management

Balasana, also known as child’s pose, is a resting pose in yoga. The word “balasana” comes from the Sanskrit words “bala,” meaning “child,” and “asana,” meaning “pose.” This pose is often used as a resting pose between more active poses, or as a way to release tension and anger. To perform child’s pose, start in a kneeling position with your buttocks resting on your heels.

The Hindi word “suhkusana” can be translated to English as “anger.” This word is often used to describe the feeling of anger that one experiences when they are upset or frustrated. When someone is suhkusana, they may feel like they are about to explode with anger. This feeling can be caused by many different things, such as stress, anxiety, or even just everyday life.  It is of no wonder then why this pose is utilized in anger management.

Savasana, also known as corpse pose, is a posture that is often used in yoga classes. The purpose of savasana is to allow the body and mind to relax and release any tension that has been built up during the practice. Anger is an emotion that is characterized by feelings of frustration, hostility, and/or aggression. It is often triggered by a perceived threat or injustice.

Matsyasana is a yoga asana that helps to release anger. When we are angry, we tend to hold our breath or take shallow breaths. This asana helps to release the tension in the body and allows us to take deep, calming breaths. It also helps to lengthen the spine, which can help to improve our posture and alleviate back pain.

Uttanasana, or “intense stretching pose,” is a yoga asana that is said to be beneficial for anger management. The practice of Uttanasana is said to help release tension and stress from the body, which can often contribute to feelings of anger. In addition, the deep breathing associated with Uttanasana is said to help relax the mind and body, providing a sense of calmness and peace.

Conclusion

In conclusion, yoga is a great way to help manage anger. It can be done in a group setting or at home, and only requires a yoga mat and some comfortable clothing. Yoga can help to focus the mind and body, and release tension that may be causing anger.  If you are feeling angry, there are certain yoga poses that can help you to manage that anger. These poses include the Camel Pose, the Child’s Pose, and the Corpse Pose. By practicing these poses, you can help to calm yourself down and find some inner peace. If you are looking for a way to manage your anger, give yoga a try.

Please also review AIHCP’s program in Anger Management Consulting and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals looking to earn a certification in Anger Management.

AIHCP also offers a program in Meditation Instructor that can help individuals utilize meditation in their daily lives and help teach others.  Obviously Yoga is an important element in meditation and is also discussed. In addition, Yoga also is beneficial in Stress Management and AIHCP also offers a certification for those interested in teaching Stress Management.

All three of these programs are very much integrated and connected in practice and better outcomes with anger and stress.

Additional Resources

“Development and validation of Yoga Module for Anger Management in adolescents”. Alaka ManiTL, etc. al. Complementary Therapies in Medicine Volume 61, September 2021, 102772. Access here

“Yoga for Anger Management: Practice These Yoga Exercises to Control Anger”. Ashish. December 21st, 2021. Fitsri. Access here

“Yoga for Anger Management: Release Negative Energy”. Taylah Soutter. September 20th, 2022. Men’s Yoga Journal.  Access here

“HOW YOGA BENEFITS ANGER MANAGEMENT”. Nicole Anderson. The Strive. Access here

Anger Management and Unresolved Trauma Video

Unresolved anger in trauma is very common.   The trauma caused can lead to anger towards the situation, society or the perpetrator of the trauma.  Forgiveness, letting go and and finding peace can be difficult with unresolved anger.  Many times, aggression and and violence can emerge from this type of unresolved conflict.  This is especially true if justice is not given to a particular past wrong.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification.

 

 

Please review the video below

Anger and Violence in Society

Anger is a complex emotion that is characterized by feelings of frustration, annoyance, and hostility. It is often triggered by a perceived threat or injustice. When someone feels angry, they may experience physiological changes such as an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. This can lead to aggressive behaviors such as yelling or violence.
Anger is a normal and healthy emotion. However, it can become problematic if it is expressed in unhealthy ways or if it is constantly present.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification.

The ability to control one’s anger is a critical life skill. Anger is a natural emotion, but it can become problematic when it is not managed in a healthy way. Some people have difficulty controlling their anger, which can lead to problems at home, work, and in social situations. There are a number of strategies that can be used to control anger. These include relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring, and problem-solving.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Courses

Anger management refers to the process of recognizing and regulating one’s own emotions, as well as the emotions of others. It is a skillset that can be learned and practiced in order to better manage aggressive impulses, handle conflict constructively, and maintain healthier relationships.
There are a number of different approaches to anger management, but all share the common goal of helping individuals identify and cope with the triggers and symptoms of anger in a more productive way.

When one does not manage one’s anger, a variety of issues can arise in life.  Hence it is critical to employ anger management strategies.  Anger however is seen in a variety of issues where it is not healthy or productive but dangerous to everyone.

Domestic violence is a large problem due to uncontrolled anger. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

Illicit anger can cause havoc in the home life.  Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.  Many families deal with domestic violence.  It may not just by physical in nature but may also be mental.  While men usually resort to physical abuse, many women can also be perpetrators through emotional abuse.

There is no one answer to addressing the issue of domestic violence. However, various experts agree that there are some key steps that can be taken in order to effectively address and prevent domestic violence.  Some of the key steps that can be taken to address domestic violence include: increasing public awareness and education about the issue, strengthening legal protections and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence, and increasing access to support services for survivors of domestic violence.  If you are in immediate danger, call 911. If you cannot talk on the phone, try to text or use social media to reach out for help. Once you are safe, you can call a national hotline like the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

Dangerous anger is not just left at home but it can also follow one to the work place.  Displaced anger can travel back and forth between home and work and manifest in either environments.

Workplace anger is a type of emotion that is characterized by feeling mad or frustrated while at work. This type of emotion can be caused by a variety of things, such as feeling like you are not being appreciated or feeling like you are not being compensated fairly. Workplace anger can also be caused by feeling like your work is not fulfilling or challenging enough. Whatever the cause, workplace anger can lead to negative outcomes, such as decreased productivity, decreased job satisfaction, and even quitting your job.  In addition work place anger can lead to more violence with shootings via disgruntled individuals.

There are a few things you can do to stop workplace anger. First, try to identify the source of your anger. Is it your boss? A co-worker? Once you know who or what is causing your anger, you can try to address the issue directly. If that’s not possible or if the issue is not resolved, you can try to distance yourself from the person or situation that’s causing your anger. Finally, you can try to reframe your thinking about the situation.

In addition, anger and unresolved issues find its place in schools.  School shootings over unresolved anger or bullying can erupt quickly.  School violence is a serious problem in today’s society. It includes any form of violence, whether it is physical, verbal, or emotional, that takes place within the school setting. School violence can have a negative impact on the students, the staff, and the overall climate of the school. It is important for schools to take measures to prevent and address school violence.
Violence and anger in schools are a national crisis. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting

 

There are a number of ways to address the problem of school violence. One approach is to increase security measures such as metal detectors and security guards. Another approach is to provide more support services for students who may be at risk for violence. This might include counseling, conflict resolution training, and after-school programs.
Still another approach is to address the underlying causes of school violence. This might involve working with families and communities to reduce poverty and improve mental health services.  Teachers, administrators, and students all have a role to play in stopping school violence. By working together, we can make our schools safe places for learning
Lack of proper anger management and utilization of skills associated with it lead to these three types of violence.  It is important to see the issues that can erupt from the inability at a young age to control rage and anger.  The family and its interactions with society in public sphere all become affected by the inability to control the emotion of anger.  Again anger itself is not the villain but improper control of it.  When not controlled properly or managed, it leaks into every social aspect of society.
Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals. The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.
Additional Resources
Anger Management by WebMD contributors
Workplace Violence from the US Department of Labor

Silent Treatment and Anger Management

The silent treatment is a way of punishing someone by refusing to speak to them or acknowledge them. It’s a way of making them feel invisible and unimportant. It can be used as a form of control, to manipulate someone into doing what you want them to do. It can also be used as a weapon in an argument, to hurt and punish the other person. The silent treatment is a powerful tool, and it can be very effective in getting what you want from someone.   Anger Management can help individuals react properly to this passive aggressive form of punishment.

Silent treatment is a passive aggressive tactic. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

Learning to identify why someone is using this type of aggression upon oneself and how to react without becoming angry is critical.  Anger Management teaches one not only how to react to such treatment but also how to see how it is a poor way to cope as a person.   The article, “Why the Silent Treatment Is Such a Destructive Form of Passive-Aggression” by Bernard Golden looks closer at how silent treatment is used to control others.   He also discusses how use of the silent treatment can be a form of emotional abuse and how to properly deal with it.  He states,

“Being the target of silent treatment is a challenge for anyone, but it is especially difficult for individuals who already have low self-esteem as well as individuals who have anxious attachment. A part of this pattern includes fear regarding the stability and dependability of relationships—anxiety that is only provoked by silent treatment. Subsequently, more than others, they may be quick to feel intense rejection and fear of loss. Such silence is experienced as betrayal and abandonment. As reflected in one study, targets who could not attribute the ostracism to a specific cause were more likely to experience a threat to their belongingness and self-esteem than those who could identify a specific cause”

Why the Silent Treatment Is Such a Destructive Form of Passive-Aggression. Bernard Golden, Ph.D. Psychology Today. September 11th, 2022

To read the entire article, please click here

Commentary

It is important to not use this type of abuse nor react to it with more anger.  It is important to treat each other with respect and work with each other and not seek to punish each other via other passive ways of anger and control.  In reactions, Anger Management can be helpful against passive aggression.  Anger management is a process whereby an individual learns to recognize and control their own anger. It can be helpful in situations where someone’s anger is causing problems in their life, or when it feels out of control. The aim of anger management is not to eliminate all anger, but rather to teach people how to express it in a healthy way. There are a number of different techniques that can be used in anger management, including relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring, and problem-solving.  All of these strategies can help an individual better react to passive emotional abuse such as the silent treatment.  It can also help de-escalate the situation and force the other individual to face the issue at hand and communicate the problem in hopefully healthy way.

Silent Treatment

The silent treatment is a form of emotional abuse in which the abuser intentionally withholds communication from the victim, refusing to speak to them or engage with them in any way. The purpose of this behavior is to control the victim by inflicting psychological pain, making them feel isolated and helpless. This tactic is often used as a means of punishment, to make the victim feel guilty for whatever wrong they have supposedly committed.

The silent treatment is a form of psychological warfare that is often used in relationships. It is a way to control the other person by withholding communication and refusing to engage in dialogue. The goal is to make the other person feel powerless and helpless. The silent treatment can be used as a form of punishment or revenge. It can also be used to manipulate the other person into doing what you want them to do.

The silent treatment is a response to conflict that involves one person withdrawing from the interaction. This can be done verbally, by physically leaving the area, or by simply ignoring the other person. The goal of the silent treatment is to punish the other person or to make them feel uncomfortable.
There are a few ways to respond to the silent treatment. One way is to ignore it and not let it affect you. While this may be difficult, by applying anger management strategies and understanding the intent and purpose of the passive aggression, one can better react and respond to the treatment in a non violent and angry way.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the silent treatment is not an effective way to deal with anger. It can actually make the situation worse. If you’re angry with someone, it’s important to communicate openly and honestly. This will help you resolve the issue and maintain a healthy relationship.  Equally, it is important to be able to respond effectively when someone uses the silent treatment against you.  Primarily by not reinforcing the behavior via acknowledgement.  Sometimes though it may take restraint not to fall into the trap.  Anger Management plays a key role in helping individuals maintain a peaceful reaction.

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Training.  By completing the required courses,  behavioral health professionals can earn the four year certification.

 

Additional Resources

“Is the silent treatment a form of abuse?”. Jayne Leonard.  Medical News Today.  June 8th, 2020.  Access here

“11 Anger Management Strategies to Help You Calm Down”, Amy Morin, LCSW. Verywellmind. August 24th, 2022. Access here

“Anger Management”. Elizabeth Dougherty. Harvard Medicine. Spring 2022.  Access here

“How to Recognize the Signs of Emotional Abuse”. Ann Pietrangelo and Crystal Raypole. Healthline. January 28th, 2022. Access here

 

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on the Negative Results of Yelling

One thing angry people usually think nothing of is how they make others feel.  If there is one thing a good person who may have a temper should consider is how they make others feel and try to correct it.  Anger Management can help individuals develop skills to control tempers and reduce yelling.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

Yelling has negative effects on people. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The reality is words and yelling have negative effects on friends and family.  The negative effects on family and friends are something those with a temper should take into consideration.  It is one of the biggest reasons to learn to control anger and a violent temper.

The article, “The Psychological Effects of Being Yelled At” by Carrie Modermo looks closer at how people are negatively affected through the yelling of angry individuals.  She states,

“Yelling is a common occurrence in most households, and it’s estimated that about 90% of American parents have reported using harsh verbal discipline at least once.1 This tends to use psychological force to cause emotional pain or discomfort. The purpose of yelling is usually to control another person’s behavior.2  Severe verbal discipline takes yelling to a new level and is more harmful. It may include swearing, cursing, name-calling, or insulting. This severe verbal discipline has been associated with conduct problems in children and adolescents. It may also lead to higher physical aggression, delinquency, and interpersonal problems.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.