How to Parent a Child with ADHD

Children with ADHD can be a lot to handle.  They are constantly distracted and on the move and can get into things if not properly monitored.  Parents can become quickly frustrated with these antics and lose their cool.  Parents can add fuel to the fire by responding improperly to ADHD behavior.  It is important to understand how to respond to children with ADHD as to better control the behavior and help the child cope.

Parenting can be stressful enough, but with ADHD children it can become a difficult route if one does not know how to cope with ADHD symptoms

 

The article, “2 Things It’s Best Not to Say to Children With ADHD” by Anthony Smith takes a closer look at how to properly manage a child with ADHD.  He warns against fueling ADHD behavior and making it worst by avoiding certain actions and behaviors.  In particular, he lists the comments “Will You Behave” and “Can you stop and just focus” as two phrases to avoid.  He states,

“People who encounter kids with ADHD are frequently guilty of two phrases that ultimately add to their frustration and contribute to a negative self-perception and possibly conduct issues. If you know someone with ADHD, or you encounter such individuals on the job and aren’t sure what to say, avoiding the following two phrases will likely up your game, especially if replaced with the suggested alternatives.”

“2 Things It’s Best Not to Say to Children With ADHD”. Anthony Smith. December 30th, 2022. Psychology Today.

To learn more how to help manage children with ADHD, please read the entire article and click here

 

Commentary

Raising a child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be a challenge, but with the right knowledge and tools, parents can successfully manage their child’s condition and help them reach their full potential.  ADHD Consultants can help supply guidance and information in meeting these challenges.  Counselors with specialty certifications in ADHD can also work with a child.

As a parent of a child with ADHD, you may experience a range of emotions, including frustration, guilt, and helplessness. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone in this journey. With the right strategies and support, you can help your child thrive.

ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs a person’s ability to focus and self-regulate. It’s estimated that up to 11 percent of children between the ages of 4 and 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, making it one of the most common mental health disorders in children. While there is no single cause of ADHD, research suggests that genetics, environmental factors, and brain development may all play a role.

Identifying ADHD in Your Child

It’s important to identify ADHD early, as early intervention can be key in managing the disorder. Symptoms of ADHD vary and can range from difficulty paying attention to impulsivity and hyperactivity. Some children may be more hyperactive or impulsive, while others may have difficulty staying focused or organized.

If your child is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, they may have ADHD:

  • Difficulty paying attention or staying focused
  • Easily distracted
  • Impulsivity
  • Difficulty following instructions
  • Hyperactivity
  • Poor organizational skills

If you think your child may have ADHD, it’s important to speak with your pediatrician. They can provide a thorough medical evaluation and refer you to a mental health professional for further testing and diagnosis.

Understanding ADHD and Learning how to Parent a Child with it

Once your child is diagnosed with ADHD, it’s important to learn as much as you can about the disorder. Understanding the signs, symptoms, and treatments of ADHD can help you better manage your child’s condition and provide them with the resources they need.

The key to successful parenting of a child with ADHD is to create a positive and structured environment. This means setting clear expectations, creating routines and schedules, and providing positive reinforcement when your child meets those expectations. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of your own emotions and reactions, as your attitude and behavior can have a significant impact on your child’s mental health.

Tips for Parenting a Child with ADHD

Here are some tips for parenting a child with ADHD:

  • Establish clear rules and expectations. Set boundaries and be consistent with them.
  • Praise your child when they do something positive. Positive reinforcement can be a powerful tool for motivating good behavior.
  • Break tasks down into smaller, manageable steps. This can help your child stay focused and on task.
  • Set aside time for one-on-one activities that your child enjoys. This can help build your child’s self-esteem and allow them to practice self-regulation.
  • Limit distractions in the home. Turn off the TV and limit screen time.
  • Get organized. Create a designated space for your child’s schoolwork, toys, and other items.
  • Be patient. Parenting a child with ADHD can be challenging, but it’s important to remain patient and consistent.

Setting Limits and Creating Structure

Setting limits and creating structure is key to parenting a child with ADHD. Clear expectations and boundaries can help your child stay focused and on task. It’s also important to be consistent with these limits, as consistency can help your child develop a sense of security and predictability.

Create a routine and stick to it. Routines can help your child stay organized and on track. Have your child take part in creating the routine, as this can help them take ownership of their responsibilities. Additionally, provide rewards and consequences for good and bad behavior. Rewards can be used to motivate good behavior, while consequences should be used sparingly and only when necessary.

Developing Routines and Schedules

Having a daily routine and schedule can be helpful for a child with ADHD. Routines provide structure and can help your child stay focused and on task. Additionally, they can help your child develop time management skills, which can be invaluable both in school and in life.

When creating a routine or schedule, involve your child in the process. This can help them take ownership of their responsibilities and give them a sense of control. Additionally, it’s important to be flexible and understand that it may take some time for your child to adjust to the new routine.

Building Self-Esteem and Self-Confidence

Self-esteem and self-confidence can be a challenge for children with ADHD. It’s important to provide your child with positive reinforcement and praise when they do something positive. Additionally, try to focus on your child’s strengths and encourage them to pursue activities that they enjoy. This can help boost their self-esteem and give them a sense of accomplishment.

It’s also important to be aware of your own reactions and emotions. Children with ADHD can often feel overwhelmed by their own emotions and overwhelmed by the expectations of others. If your child is struggling, it’s important to provide them with a safe space to express their feelings and provide them with comfort and reassurance.

Understanding and Responding to Challenging Behaviors

Children with ADHD often exhibit challenging behaviors, such as impulsivity, hyperactivity, and difficulty following instructions. It’s important to be patient and understanding when confronting challenging behaviors. Talk to your child and try to understand the root cause of their behavior. Additionally, it’s important to remain consistent and provide clear expectations and consequences.

It’s also important to provide your child with positive reinforcement for good behavior. Praise them when they do something positive and reward them for meeting expectations. This can help motivate good behavior and boost their self-esteem.

How to Communicate With Your Child About ADHD

Communication is key when it comes to parenting a child with ADHD. It’s important to create an open and honest dialogue with your child about their condition. Explain their diagnosis in age-appropriate terms and help them understand their feelings and behaviors. Additionally, it’s important to be understanding and reassuring when your child is struggling.

It’s also important to provide your child with accurate information about ADHD and its treatments. This can help your child better understand their condition and feel more empowered to manage their symptoms.

Dealing with Stress and Anxiety

Parenting a child with ADHD can be stressful and overwhelming. It’s important to take time for yourself and practice self-care. Make time for activities that you enjoy and find ways to reduce stress, such as exercising or meditating. Additionally, it’s important to seek out support from family and friends.

If stress becomes too overwhelming, it’s important to speak with a mental health professional. They can provide you with the support and resources you need to better manage your stress and emotions.

Professional Resources for Parents of Children with ADHD

There are a number of resources available for parents of children with ADHD. Organizations such as CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) and the National Resource Center on ADHD provide information and support for parents. Additionally, there are a number of online resources, such as forums and support groups, that can provide you with additional information and resources.  ADHD Consultants can also supply a wealth of knowledge about managing and helping a child cope with ADHD.

Conclusion

Please review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification for mental healthcare professionals seeking a four year certification

 

Raising a child with ADHD can be challenging, but with the right knowledge and tools, parents can successfully manage their child’s condition and help them reach their full potential. By understanding ADHD and learning how to parent a child with it, parents can create a positive and structured environment and provide their child with the resources they need to succeed.

If you’re a parent of a child with ADHD, remember that you’re not alone in this journey. Seek out support, be patient, and remember to take care of yourself. With the right strategies and support, you can help your child thrive.

If on the other side, you wish to help others with ADHD, many counseling professionals seek an ADHD Consulting Certification. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your professional and academic goals.  AIHCP offers a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

 

Additional Resources

“Parenting Tips for ADHD: Do’s and Don’ts”. Eloise Porter. September 17th, 2018. Healthline. Access here

“How to Retool Your Parenting Skills When Raising a Child With ADHD”. Melissa Daly.  May 9th, 2022. WebMD. Access here

“Parenting a child, teen with ADHD”. Janice Schreier. September 13th, 2022. Mayo Clinic. Access here

“When Parent and Child Both Have ADHD”. Caroline Miller. April 12th, 2022. Child Mind Institute. Access here

Adult ADHD and Routine

ADHD can disrupt adult life.  It can mentally distract an individual and send a person’s day into disarray.  The chaos that results can affect careers and relationships.  Individuals who struggle with ADHD need to find ways to better stay on track and focused on what is important.  This may not be so easy for some but through focus and guidance one can find some “grounding” for the day.  ADHD Consultants can present a variety of ways an individual can better organize and focus throughout a day.

ADHD Consultants can help individuals with ADHD focus more and stay on course for routines. Please review AIHCP’s Program

 

Routine is one of the biggest ways an individual with ADHD can better regain control of a day.  Learning how to create and form a routine and highlight what matters most is key.  Sharon Sallne looks closer at how to organize a routine to best fit ADHD needs.  She emphasizes especially forming steps surrounded by what motivates one most.  She also suggests having accountability and having others hold one to it.  She states,

“Creating a new routine means changing habits and aiming for steadiness, not perfection. It’s not just about when you do things but how, what, and why. The “why” could be the reason you’re holding back. In some cases, you may be attached to a particular approach that may have served you in the past. These habits are developed to help you reduce stress, avoid something fearful or uncomfortable, or decrease frustration.”

“5 Strategies to Make and Keep Routines With Adult ADHD”. Sharon Sallne. November 13th, 2022.  Psychology Today

To review the entire article, please click here

Commentary

Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent and impairing symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and/or hyperactivity that manifests itself in adolescence or adulthood. The disorder can be conceptualized as having both genetic and environmental components, with the diagnostic criteria including difficulties with executive functioning, organization, planning and regulating emotions. Furthermore, individuals diagnosed with ADHD often present with difficulty achieving goals due to the aforementioned impairments.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that commonly manifests in childhood and can persist into adulthood. Adults with ADHD present with a range of characteristic symptoms, including difficulty sustaining attention and controlling impulses, restlessness, disorganization and difficulty managing time efficiently. These symptoms lead to challenges with completing tasks, interpersonal difficulties, and poor self-esteem due to unmet expectations.

ADHD and Routine

Routines are an integral part of our daily lives, providing a sense of structure and order. To form better routines, it is important to recognize the underlying cognitive processes which drive behavior. By developing an understanding of how our brains encode and store habits, it is possible to create effective cues that encourage desired behaviors. Additionally, employing techniques such as goal-setting, positive reinforcement and self-monitoring can help facilitate the development of healthy habits.

As individuals with ADHD typically show reduced impulse control, they often find it challenging to stick to a predetermined schedule. Thus, developing healthy routine patterns is an essential part of effective management of the disorder and can be achieved through a combination of cognitive behaviour therapy, educational strategies and medication.

Hence it is critical to find a way to form a healthy routine.  Remaking a routine that fits an individual’s need is key.  Highlighting what motivates oneself and what holds oneself accountable to the new routine is key.   In order to facilitate the formation of beneficial habits and routines, one should employ the technique of habit stacking. This approach involves the linking of desired behaviors with already-established habits so that an individual can become accustomed to forming new practices in a more systematic manner. Furthermore, individuals should strive to establish realistic goals for their routines as this will help to ensure that they remain motivated and engaged in the process of developing these healthy patterns.

Adherence to a routine is an important component of successful behavior management. By establishing and consistently following a set of rules and guidelines, it can foster a sense of structure, predictability, and control in one’s life. This type of procedural regularity can lead to improved psychological well-being, enhanced self-discipline, and the development of important cognitive skills such as impulse control, time management, and problem solving.

Of course, ADHD can make it difficult.  This is why accountability and counseling are sometimes needed to help keep a person with ADHD on schedule.  Through these cognitive techniques and sometimes medication, an individual will have greater success keeping a routine.

Conclusion

In conclusion, ADHD can be managed with the right mindset, support and resources. Routines are an effective way to help those with ADHD stay organized, in control and productive. Structured routines can provide a sense of security, stability and well-being for those with ADHD, as well as their families. Although it takes time and effort to establish routines that work best for each individual, the payoffs are worth it.

Individuals who follow routines more closely will have more control over their lives and be free from side tracking off the road ahead due to ADHD.   Accountability is important in holding one to a routine.  ADHD Consultants can help individuals better stay with a scheduled routine and give cognitive tips to help stay on track in achieving goals for each day.  In addition, ADHD Consultants may also be licensed counselors or healthcare professionals who can give more indepth therapy than merely a person who is certified.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

Additional Resources

“9 Tips for Creating a Routine for Adults with ADHD”. Kate Bettino. May 23rd, 2021. PsychCentral. Access here

“ADHD and the Importance of Routines”. Sandy Pace. October 18th, 2019. Libero Magazine. Access here

“Maintaining Routines when you have ADHD”.  Maaya Hitomi. March 29th, 2022. Tiimo.  Access here

“My Adult ADHD Morning Routine: Could It Work for You?”. Noelle Matteson. December 11th, 2018.  HealthyPlace. Access here

ADHD and Hypnosis

It is of no wonder that hypnotherapy can help many who deal with ADHD.  Many mental states of mind can be affected through the use of hypnotherapy.  Hypnotherapy calms many dealing with anxiety or stress, but it can also help with mental issues such as ADHD.  It allows the mind to focus more and also remember things better.  Hypnotherapy overall has a soothing effect on the mind that is dealing with ADHD.  Many with ADHD issues are being encouraged by ADHD Consultants to try out hypnotherapy and see if it can positively affect them.

Hypnosis can help individuals with ADHD find more calm and focus.

 

The article, “Hypnotherapy for ADHD Symptoms: Can Hypnosis Help?” by Beth Guadagni looks closer at how hypnotherapy can help those facing ADHD.  In her article, she looks at a study that utilized hypnotherapy on patients with ADHD and their overall positive outcomes.  The article also looks at the evolution of hypnotherapy and some calming effects on the ADHD mind that one can find.  In regards to the findings in some case trials, the article states,

“While these results may make researchers optimistic about hypnotherapy’s potential, robust clinical trials are sparse. In a small study involving 17 participants in 2014, researchers compared the results of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and hypnotherapy. Both treatment groups improved, but the hypnotherapy patients reported significantly better psychological wellbeing, and decreased anxiety, depression, and ADHD symptoms.”

Hypnotherapy for ADHD Symptoms: Can Hypnosis Help?. Beth Guadagni. November 15th, 2022. ADDitude.

To review the entire article, please click here

Commentary

Hypnosis is a psychological phenomenon which has been utilized for centuries to induce an altered state of consciousness, allowing individuals to access subconscious memories and beliefs. It is hypothesized that during hypnosis an individual’s level of suggestibility increases, making them more open to the suggestions of another individual or external factors. This heightened suggestibility can be seen in changes in behavior, thoughts, emotions, and physiological responses.  The effects of hypnosis can vary widely depending on the subject’s expectations and motivations for participation, as well as on the techniques employed by the hypnotist.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder which is characterized by persistent difficulties in the areas of executive functioning, self-regulation, and impulsivity. It is associated with impairment in multiple domains of functioning, including academic performance, interpersonal relationships, and occupational outcomes. ADHD is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

It has been shown in case studies that hypnosis can help with ADHD symptoms in regards to helping others become more calm and able to focus and concentrate.

ADHD and Hypnosis

Hypnosis has been shown to help individuals with ADHD become more calm and focused with tasks

 

Hypnosis has been utilised as a potential therapeutic intervention for patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in recent years, due to its ability to alter cognitive and behavioural processes. This is due to its potential to help increase attention span, decrease impulsivity and hyperactivity, enhance cognitive functioning, and improve overall behaviour.  By inducing an altered state of consciousness, hypnosis can facilitate access to unconscious psychological material, thus allowing for the exploration of maladaptive behaviours and emotional states that may be contributing to the disorder. Furthermore, hypnosis can also serve as a form of psychotherapy, providing an individual with the opportunity to explore and develop alternate ways of behaving in order to manage the symptoms of ADHD more effectively.

In addition, recent studies have indicated a potential for the use of hypnosis treatment to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with ADHD, such as restlessness or difficulty focusing. Hypnosis has been shown to be effective in reducing anxiety levels which can then help individuals with ADHD cope better with their daily tasks.

Conclusion

Certified Clinical Hypnotherapists can help individuals deal with symptoms of ADHD.  In particular, hypnosis can help individuals become more calm and focused despite ADHD.  This is an alternative therapy which in studies have proven to be helpful.  The evidence suggests that hypnosis can be an effective tool in helping to manage the symptoms of ADHD. The participants in this study found that they were able to concentrate better and had increased focus as a result of their hypnosis sessions. It is also important to note that there were no adverse effects reported from using this treatment, making it a viable option for those living with ADHD. With further research and study, hypnosis may become a more widely accepted treatment for ADHD.

ADHD consultants and counselors may wish to consider also utilizing hypnosis as a way to help their patients deal with ADHD.  Counselors who are ADHD certified may wish to utilize hypnosis as a potential treatment and see if it has benefits for their particular patient.

ADHD can cause lack of concentration and calm. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals and needs

 

AIHCP offers both an Certification in Clinical Hypnotherapy and also a Certification in ADHD Consulting.  Only qualified professionals in the mental health and health care fields are eligible to earn these certifications.  The programs are online and independent study and offer the professional the ability to add these credentials to their professional resume.  After completion of the required online courses, qualified professionals can then apply for a four year certification.  One can then renew that certification every four years to maintain it. Please review the programs and see if they meet your academic and professional goals.

 

Additional Resources

“The Impact of Hypnotic Suggestions on Reaction Times in Continuous Performance Test in Adults with ADHD and Healthy Controls”. Maarit Virta, etc. al.  May 11, 2015. Plos One.  Access here

“BETTER LONG-TERM OUTCOME FOR HYPNOTHERAPY THAN FOR CBT IN ADULTS WITH ADHD: RESULTS OF A SIX-MONTH FOLLOW-UP”. SEPPO HILTUNEN, etc. al. CONTEMPORARY HYPNOSIS AND INTEGRATIVE THERAPY  30(3): 118–134 (2014).  Access here

“5 Reasons to Consider Hypnosis For ADHD”. Rekha Shrivastava, M.S., CH, CRC. March 27, 2021. Blossom Hypnosis. Access here

“Hypnosis For ADHD | To Help You Treat Short Attention Span and Hyperactivity”. Hypnosis Experts. October 29th, 2021. HypnoHub.  Access here

 

ADHD Assessment in Children

Many symptoms can lead a parent to think his or her child has ADHD.  Some symptoms can mask themselves as anxiety or other stresses, but in some cases, the symptoms witnessed due directly correlate with ADHD.  ADHD is not the end of the world for your child, but it can be a major issue if it is not addressed.  It is extremely important for one’s child to receive the guidance and medication, if necessary, to help him or her function normally.  If not, ADHD can cause havoc on school, social and family life.

The article, “Could Your Child Have ADHD?” by Jeremy Sharp takes a closer look at the symptoms and next steps a parent must take to discover if one’s child has ADHD.  As a licensed psychologist, he lists the numerous possible outcomes that follow an assessment and the procedures needed to ensure the child receives the care he or she needs.  He reassures parents that they are not alone in this process and that there is light at the end of the tunnel.  He states,

If you think your child may have ADHD, it is important to get the child assessed and tested for it. It can be the difference of a life time for him or her

 

“As a parent and a child psychologist, I have a lot of empathy for other parents struggling with the question of whether their child may have ADHD. Despite all of the popular media representation and legitimate resources out there, it’s still a challenging question to answer! For all of you trying to figure it out, I hope that this article will offer a little bit of a roadmap to move forward.”

“Could Your Child Have ADHD?”. Jeremy Sharp, PhD. October 14th, 2022. WebMD.

To read the entire article, please access here

Commentary

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder that is characterized by problems with inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Symptoms of ADHD typically begin in childhood and can persist into adulthood. ADHD affects individuals of all ages and from all walks of life, though it is most commonly diagnosed in children. The exact cause of ADHD is unknown, though it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Symptoms within children

There are a variety of symptoms that can be seen in children who have ADHD. Some of the more common ones include difficulties with sustaining attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. However, it is important to note that not all children with ADHD will display all of these symptoms. And, the severity of symptoms can vary greatly from child to child. In general, children with ADHD tend to have more difficulty than their peers in completing tasks, following through on instructions, and staying organized.

There are several ways to assess whether a child has ADHD. One common method is to use behavior rating scales. These scales are completed by parents, teachers, and/or other adults who have regular contact with the child. The scales measure symptoms of ADHD across different settings and over time. Another way to assess ADHD is through neuropsychological testing, which can measure attention, impulsivity, and activity level.

Ways to control child ADHD

There are a number of ways to control child ADHD. One way is to use medication. This can be helpful in reducing the symptoms of ADHD. Another way to control child ADHDis to use behavioral therapy. This can help the child learn how to better manage their symptoms. Finally, it is important to provide support and understanding to the child and their family. This can help the child cope with their condition and reduce the impact of ADHD on their life.

There are three types of medication typically prescribed for ADHD: stimulants, non-stimulants, and antidepressants. Stimulants are the most common type of medication prescribed for ADHD and work by increasing levels of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain. Non-stimulants also increase levels of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain, but they do so indirectly.

There are numerous benefits of controlling child ADHD. Perhaps most importantly, controlling child ADHD can help improve the overall quality of the child’s life. In addition, it can help the child to better cope with his or her condition and potentially prevent future problems associated with ADHD. Additionally, treating child ADHD can also help to improve academic performance and family functioning. Finally, treating child ADHD can also reduce the risk of future substance abuse and other psychiatric problems.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is important to remember that child ADHD is a real and serious condition. It can be difficult for children to cope with and can have a negative impact on their schooling, social life, and family life. There are treatments available that can help children manage their symptoms and lead happy, healthy lives.  It is important to consider using assessments for children with ADHD in order to provide the best possible care. These assessments can help identify areas of need and allow for tailored interventions. While there is no one perfect assessment, using a combination of tools can give a well-rounded picture of a child’s strengths and weaknesses. Ultimately, these assessments can help children with ADHD reach their full potential. If you think your child may have ADHD, talk to your doctor and see what he or she recommends.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.  After completing the courses, qualified professionals can then apply with AIHCP for the certification.

Additional Resources

“ADHD: Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents”. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. Pediatrics (2011) 128 (5): 1007–1022.  Access here

“ADHD in Young Children” CDC. Updated Nov. 8, 2018. Vital Signs.  Access here

“ADHD in Children”. Help Guide.  Updated.  Nov 1st, 2022.  Access here

“18 Early Warning Signs of ADHD You Can Observe in Your Children”. The Iowa Clinic. May 29th, 2020. The Iowa Clinic.  Access here

 

ADHD Symptoms and Signs

Individuals with ADHD are not lazy or unintelligent but are individuals who suffer from a disorder that prevents them from focusing on tasks.   They become easily distracted and can lose focus on what needs done.  Due to this, especially in school, students are sometimes singled out as not studious or intelligent. ADHD not only affects children, but also adults.  In this regard, ADHD can disrupt work and career, plus relationships with others.  It is important to diagnose ADHD whether as a child or adult to receive the proper professional ADHD Consulting and Counseling.

Students with ADHD are not lazy. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your goals

 

The article, “5 Overlooked Signs of ADHD – the Inattentive Type” by Sharon Saline looks closer at signs and symptoms of ADHD.  She lists a variety of common signs including forgetfulness, distraction, incomplete tasks, following instructions and disorganization.  She also counters with various strategies to help the person overcome these symptoms.  She states,

“People with inattentive type ADHD (formerly called ADD) struggle with managing time, losing or misplacing things, and attending to details (resulting in careless mistakes), among other symptoms. Over time, these individuals may experience a higher level of mental fatigue and forgetfulness, and lower sustained energy throughout a task than do their non-ADHD peers.”

“5 Overlooked Signs of ADHD – the Inattentive Type”. Sharon Saline. ADDitude. July 11th, 2022.

To review the entire article, please click here

Commentary

ADHD is a mental disorder that is characterized by problems with focus, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. People with ADHD may have difficulty paying attention, sitting still, or controlling their impulses. ADHD can cause problems in school, work, and social relationships.

Symptoms of ADHD

The symptoms of ADHD can be divided into two categories: inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity. Inattention refers to difficulties with sustaining attention, concentrating, and being organized. Individuals with ADHD may also have difficulty with following instructions, completing tasks, and keeping track of belongings. Hyperactivity-impulsivity refers to difficulties with remaining still or feeling restless and fidgety. Individuals with ADHD may also have difficulty with talking excessively, interrupting others, and acting without thinking.  Symptoms of ADHD typically begin before the age of seven. The exact cause of ADHD is unknown, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment for ADHD typically includes medication, counseling, and behavioral therapy.

ADHD Diagnosis

The diagnosis of ADHD can be made by a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist, psychologist, or clinical social worker, who conducts a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation. The assessment may include a physical examination, interviews with the child and parent or other caregivers, and review of school records. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association, is used to diagnose ADHD.

In some cases, diagnosis may not be to adulthood which can leave the individual with a life long story of confusion.  Due sometimes to over diagnosis, or parental hesitation, this can occur but it is important if two or more symptoms consistently manifest for parents to have their children tested.  In the long run, it will answer many questions, help the child in every aspect of life and correct many disciplinary issues.

Coping with ADHD

Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and behavioral therapy. Medication is an important part of treatment for ADHD. Stimulant medications, such as methylphenidate and amphetamine, are the most commonly prescribed medications for ADHD.  Adderal is a medication that is commonly used to treat ADHD. It works by increasing levels of the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain, which helps to improve focus and concentration.

There are a number of ways to cope with ADHD. One way is to take medication prescribed by a physician. Another way is to develop coping mechanisms, such as using a planner or schedule, setting timers, and breaking tasks into smaller chunks. It is also important to establish routines and stick to them as much as possible.  Additionally, it is important to find healthy outlets for excess energy and impulsivity, such as exercise or creative pursuits. Finally, it is helpful to talk to others who understand what it is like to live with ADHD.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is important to be aware of the symptoms of ADHD in order to get the proper diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and intervention is key to managing the symptoms and preventing them from adversely affecting one’s life. If you or someone you know is exhibiting signs of ADHD, don’t hesitate to reach out to a mental health professional for help.

The treatment of ADHD can be difficult and it is a good idea to consult with a doctor. There are many ways to treat ADHD, and each person may respond differently to each treatment. Some common treatments include medication, therapy, and lifestyle changes. It is important to find what works best for you or your child and to stick with the treatment plan.  Again, the most important thing is to get help if you experience any of these symptoms or if you child or children experience any.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.  Qualified professionals include those in mental health, healthcare and teaching positions who are looking to grasp a deeper understanding of ADHD.  After completing the required courses, one is then eligible to apply for the four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

Additional Resources

“Diagnosis and Management of ADHD in Children”. BARBARA T. FELT, MD, MS, et.al. Am Fam Physician. 2014;90(7):456-464.  Access here

“ADHD Diagnosis and Treatment Guidelines: A Historical Perspective”. Mark L. Wolraich, MD, et.al. Pediatrics. Volume 144, Issue 4 October 2019. Access here

“Adult ADHD: Diagnosis, Differential Diagnosis, and Medication Management”. Julie P. Gentile, MD, et, al. Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2006 Aug; 3(8): 25–30.  Access here

“Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children”. Mayo Clinic Staff.  Mayo Clinic. Access here

“Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)”.Medically Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD. WebMed.  February 22nd, 2021. Access here

 

Does Adult ADHD Lead to Alcoholism or Drug Use? 

Written by Fay Smith

ADHD is a common diagnosis for kids who struggle in school, but what happens when kids grow up and struggle in their offices, communities, and relationships?

Adults with ADHD have difficult challenges, and many turn to drugs and alcohol to cope.

In this article, we’ll look at how and why that is.

How Adults Cope with ADHD

ADHD presents many challenges for adults, but one of the biggest is regularly lacking dopamine.

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is largely responsible for the pleasure that you feel when you accomplish something. A sense of accomplishment boosts you and makes it easier to take on your next tasks. For people with ADHD, this doesn’t happen the same way.

Adults with ADHD have a different reward system than neurotypical adults. A normal work routine, including meetings, might be somewhat boring for an office manager who is neurotypical, but it could send someone with ADHD into a spiral.

Without feeling like they are accomplishing anything important to them, and receiving the dopamine boost that goes along with that, it becomes increasingly hard to concentrate.

Having ADHD and needing to do things you don’t want to do and aren’t interested in can be extremely difficult, and even painful.

It’s a process of trying to force your brain to act in ways it doesn’t want to. The result is usually a drop in neurotransmitters and the onset of depression. Up to 53% of people with ADHD also struggle with depression.

There are legal substances that can provide a lot of help to adults with ADHD. Coffee can help to stimulate the brain to produce more neurotransmitters, and legal CBD can help to relax the nervous system and provide the restful sleep that adults with ADHD need to maintain good brain health. Know more about it here.

However, there are many adults with ADHD who turn to alcohol and drugs – not just to cope with the pain of having ADHD as an adult in a world designed for neurotypical people, but to help manage an unruly brain that won’t seem to follow directions.

Why do ADHD Adults Turn to Drugs and Alcohol?

It’s important to note that every adult with ADHD was once a child with ADHD, and it is typically in pre-adolescence or adolescence when substance abuse problems or tendencies first arise.

An 8-year longitudinal study found that at the age of 14.9, 40% of ADHD subjects and only 22% of control subjects had used alcohol (Barkley et al. 1990). This suggests that alcohol and other drugs are more appealing to people with ADHD in early adolescence.

A different study found that at age 25, alcohol use was roughly equal between ADHD adults and control groups, but we know that early and intense alcohol use is a risk factor for later alcohol and drug problems.

Growing up is when most people start to face increasing demands on their time and attention, which is also when young adults with ADHD begin to face significant struggles and shoulder the shame that comes from not being able to act or be like everyone else.

ADHD adults use drugs to cope, practically and emotionally.

In a practical sense, drugs and alcohol change the brain and produce the mental states that people with ADHD are looking for. When you are unable to feel happy or concentrate, a cup of coffee can help. So can other drugs. When you can’t seem to calm down or regulate your energy or emotions, alcohol can help. So can other drugs.

Neurotypical adults might be able to take a deep breath and restore calm and focus, but this just doesn’t happen for ADHD adults, who struggle to regulate themselves.

On an emotional level, it is easy to blame yourself for your problems as someone with ADHD. An inability to focus can be mistaken as a lack of interest or care. Disinterest in boring and unrewarding tasks can come across as laziness.

Adults with ADHD have to deal with a disabling inability to focus, as well as being blamed personally for that inability to focus.

In a culture that values constant productivity and readiness, adults with ADHD often struggle to regulate their attention and emotions and use drugs or alcohol as tools to cope.

Recovery for Adults with ADHD and Drug Problems

Although alcohol and other drugs might relieve temporary symptoms of ADHD, they invariably make life worse.

This is not just for all of the reasons that you’re familiar with – the cost, the health impacts, the social impacts, etc – but also because alcohol and most other drugs are harmful to the brain and end up making symptoms worse in the long run.

A healthy brain releases more neurotransmitters that help focus and attention. An unhealthy brain doesn’t regulate itself well. When you start messing with your brain’s reward system, it makes it even harder to set things right.

If you or someone you know is an adult with ADHD and a drug or alcohol problem, find a treatment solution that also addresses the impacts of ADHD. True recovery requires solutions to multiple problems.

 

 


Author Bio: Fay Smith

Fay Smith worked in communications for five years before settling down with her husband. She’s now a mother of two young children and takes care of three lovable Pomeranians. Fay Smith is a regular contributor on various health and wellness sites. She also works as a freelance writer and researcher on wellness topics, such as alternative treatments and CBD.

 

 

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Attention Deficit Consulting certificate program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program in online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

ADHD Consulting Program Blog on ADHD and Disorganization

ADHD can make one disorganized.  In that disorganization messiness is the final result.  Many individuals with ADHD have messes throughout their work area or home and are unable to keep things organized due to the constant movement from one issue to another.  Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program

ADHD can lead to disorganization and messiness in one’s life. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program

 

The article, “Can ADHD Cause You to Be Messy and Disorganized?” from Healthline looks closer at how ADHD can lead to messes and disorganization in life.  The article states,

 

“ADHD’s cognitive effects can cause you to have trouble finishing tasks, such as homework, or scheduling appointments. This can also include tasks relating to the organization of a physical space, like your room or office. For example, maybe you did the laundry but haven’t folded it, so it just sits on the ground all week. Or you might start several creative projects and leave their elements out and about, cluttering the room. You may also find yourself constantly misplacing items.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

ADHD Consulting Certification Blog on ADHD and Emotion

ADHD can work hand and hand with emotions.  Emotions can emerge with the impulsivity of ADHD and later cause one to regret certain behaviors.  It is important to understand how emotions and ADHD can work against oneself and be able to better cope.  Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program

ADHD can enhance emotional outbursts. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “ADHD and Emotions in Adults: Exploring the Connections” from Healthline looks closer at the issues emotions and ADHD together can cause.  The article states,

“Emotional impulsivity, then, describes sudden actions in direct response to an inability to regulate emotions. In children, this may largely be recognized as an inability to take turns when playing games or talking over others. While adults may also experience such symptoms, signs of emotional impulsivity can become even more problematic in daily life”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

ADHD Consulting Specialist Program Blog on ADHD Misdiagnosis

ADHD is one of the most common over misdiagnosed mental issues in children.  It is easy to misdiagnose due to the multiple symptoms and the differences in its appearance from person to person.  With this in mind, it is important to receive a very accurate diagnosis regarding ADHD.  Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Specialist Program

ADHD is commonly misdiagnosed. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Specialist Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “Why ADHD Misdiagnoses Can Be Common” By Stephanie Wright takes a closer look at ADHD and misdiagnosis.  She states,

“Sometimes, doctors don’t get an initial diagnosis right. Being your own health advocate can help ensure you get the correct diagnosis, critical to receiving effective care.  If you’ve been correctly diagnosed with ADHD, it’s going to be OK. Though stigma still exists, society has come a long way in awareness and acceptance of mental health conditions.  You don’t need to hide your symptoms. Your local health office is a safe space to seek help for your mental health condition — whether it’s ADHD or something different.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Specialist Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as an ADHD Consultant Specialist.

ADHD Consulting Certification Blog on Undiagnosed ADHD

Many adults never go diagnosed with ADHD during childhood.  Later in life these adults can feel like most of their life was a misunderstanding and if they had help they could have done so many things better.  Others have other social issues to deal with due to the stigma of ADHD.

Adult ADHD is usually undiagnosed as a kid. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program

 

The article, “How undiagnosed ADHD can impact children later in life” by Theresa Ho looks at the impacts of undiagnosed ADHD.  She states,

“Nguyen, now 25, said that she didn’t think that she had ADHD because she always earned decent grades growing up, and she thought ADHD was a learning disability. She went to another therapist for a second opinion, and when that therapist confirmed the diagnosis, she went to a psychiatrist who also confirmed her diagnosis. Watson said that ADHD is a unique and complicated diagnosis.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.