ADHD Consulting Certification Article on Adult ADHD

Adults can go throughout life with ADHD and not know they have ADHD.  ADHD’s presence, however, can be causing havoc in their daily lives.  Relationships and careers can be negatively affected by ADHD.  This is why if one exhibits various symptoms, it is important they receive testing to verify if they have ADHD.

Adult ADHD could be affecting you! Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “Psychological Testing and Diagnosis of ADHD in Adults” from Healthline looks at why it is important for adults with ADHD to receive the help they need.  The article states,

“Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects an estimated 2.5 percent of adults. It’s a mental health condition that leads to problems such as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.  Untreated ADHD can disrupt many aspects of your life, such as your employment and your relationships. Getting a proper diagnosis is the first step to getting treatment.  Adults with ADHD often respond well to a combination of psychotherapy and medication.”

To read the entire article, please click here

ADHD is not merely a child disorder but also one that can cause a multitude of problems for adults if left untreated.  Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

 

ADHD Consulting Article on ADHD Diagnosis

ADHD affects many children and adults.  Identifying it is a critical part in learning how to live with it and have a productive life.  Diagnosis though is a long and complicated process.  There are numerous tests and screenings that help pin point if one has it or if it is severe or mild.

Early diagnosis of ADHD is important. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Training

 

The article, “How ADHD Is Diagnosed” by Lauren Krouse takes a closer look how ADHD is diagnosed and and tested.  She states,

“A healthcare provider can confirm an ADHD diagnosis with an in-depth interview and physical exam. However, diagnostic criteria vary slightly depending on whether the patient is an adult or a child.:

There are various steps and procedures for adults and children in diagnosing ADHD. To learn more and to read the entire article, please click here

With 5 percent of children and 2.5 percent of adults diagnosed with ADHD, it is important to learn if you or your child has it.  If you suspect, take action and get the help that is needed.  Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Training and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

 

ADHD Consulting Certification Program Article on ADHD and Adult Symptoms

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder or ADHD has many different symptoms.  Different individuals manifest different elements.  The symptoms are disruptive at varying degrees for different individuals.  Adults can especially have negative social consequences due to their ADHD.  Learning to overcome symptoms of ADHD is critical for adults who may never have known they had ADHD.

Identifying ADHD in adults is important for a better professional life. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification

 

The article, “10 Signs of ADHD in Adults—& Why Its So Important to Spot, According to an Expert Who Has It Herself” by Dara Katz takes a closer look at ADHD in adults and why it is so critical for adults to seek help if they have ADHD.  She states,

“You’ve heard about ADHD in children, and you even recognize how important it is for kids’ and their families to spot and acknowledge it so they can better thrive in play, school and home. But what about undiagnosed ADHD in adults? Judy Katz, a pediatric occupational therapist in Chicago, has not only worked with families to support the subtle yet complex lives of kids with sensory processing issues and ADHD for years, but she herself has ADHD—and she only recognized it in adulthood.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The ADHD Consulting Program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in this field.

ADHD Consulting Program Article on Living with Adult ADHD

ADHD can be a difficult problem for many adults.  It is always present and can interfere with home, work, and relationships.  It is important to identify it and understand how to cope with it.

ADHD can be a troublesome problem for adults. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it meets you academic and professional goals.

 

The article, “My ADHD is Like Curious George — Only More Nefarious” by Max Darwin looks at ADHD from the perspective of the analogy of a monkey on one’s back.  He states,

“To help me see the ADHD, I came up with a visual aid – of ADHD as a monkey on my back. Not a nice monkey from a nature documentary. This is a mischievous monkey who will pick my pockets and steal everything if I leave the window open. He’s so nimble that I never feel his physical presence, yet he’s constantly tapping me on the shoulder or putting his hands in front of my eyes to prevent me from seeing the full picture”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHC’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

 

ADHD Consulting Program Article on ADHD and To Do Lists

Staying in line and focused is difficult for busy adults who deal with ADHD.  Lists almost become essential and can be a way to keep one on track, but even the basic list can become daunting.  The basic list can make one feel trapped and subject to a conveyer belt like life, where one is merely doing the motions, forced to complete each task at a certain time.  One with ADHD can quickly fall away from this intense structure.

Lists can help an ADHD mind organize. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it meets your goals

 

In the article, “Don’t Be a Victim of Your To-Do List” by Gretchen Rubin looks at other types of lists that can help someone fulfill duties with less stress.  She states,

“It’s easy to feel overwhelmed at the sight of all the errands, tasks, and aims that re-quire our attention. If you can’t bear to contemplate the complete list, try making a “to-day” list. Just list the things that you’d like to get done today. We’re told that “everybody” should use to-do lists, and that “everybody” finds them useful. But, in the end, they don’t work for everyone.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Lists are helpful but should not dominate one’s success for the day.  Lists help people with ADHD and OCD departmentalize what needs done and in what urgency. Multiple lists that illustrate what has been accomplished, or what needs done sooner than later can help someone not feel as overwhelmed.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals. The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

ADHD Consulting Certification on ADHD and Stress of Parents

Children with any mental or learning disorder can be difficult to raise and teach.  Parents have specially many issues with children with ADHD.  ADHD can be a challenging disorder for children that creates improper behaviors that can be challenging for parents to control.  Whether at home, school or in public, ADHD can cause issues with behavior.

Children with ADHD can provide stress and challenges to parents. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Training Program

 

The article, “What it’s like parenting with ADHD symptoms: ‘It felt like my head was going to explode’” by Ralinda Harvey-Smith looks at how parents can become highly stressed when dealing with their children who have ADHD.  The article states,

“Millions of adults suffer from ADHD, and although those with a hyperactive-impulsive presentation are often diagnosed as children, those withpredominantly inattentive symptoms — such as difficulty focusing, paying attention to details, lack of organization, forgetfulness and trouble finishing tasks — can go undiagnosed, according to Cleveland Clinic. That can be troublesome for women and girls, whose inattentive symptoms might not stand out and who can better mask their symptoms than males.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Training and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  Qualified professionals can earn a four year certification in ADHD Consulting Training by taking the required online and independent courses.

ADHD Consulting Certification Article on ADHD and Self Image

Kids and teens with ADHD can low self imaging.  The ADHD can contribute to the low self image.  It is important for parents to understand ADHD and also know how to help the child reshape his or her image.  Building confidence in ADHD kids is an important task of the parent and will lead to better adult behaviors.

Self image and confidence is critical for ADHD children. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification

 

The article, “Q: My Teen Thinks His ADHD Makes Him ‘Worthless.’” by Sharon Saline reviews how parents can help their children with better imaging while coping with ADHD.  She states,

“To help him build self-worth, confidence, and resiliency, notice and validate any efforts your teen is making toward anything, whether in school, with friends, with hobbies, or when at home. Help him notice the positive events and small victories in his days. Beginning to focus on the positive can help your teen feel like he’s in control, especially at a time when so much change is outside of our control.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

ADHD Consulting Program Article on Adult ADHD

Not just children have ADHD and when adults have it, it can be sometimes confusing and embarrassing.  Many adults go undiagnosed and have no understanding why they act or behave they way they do.  Their professional, financial and relational behaviors have always baffled everyone but the reality is they have ADHD.

Many adults never know they have ADHD. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “What ADHD feels like for adults” by Grace Jennings-Edquist looks at what is like for adults to have ADHD.  She states,

“Adults with the disorder can have trouble paying attention to details and following through on instructions. They may have difficulty organising tasks and activities; be easily distracted; be forgetful; fidget with hands or feet; make impulsive decisions; or talk excessively.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

ADHD Consulting Program Article on Organization and ADHD

ADHD has an ability to cause adults with it to be plagued with disorder.  The disorder is in every facet of their life.  Some forms of disorder can be brought to order though with clearer thinking and various coping strategies and tools.

Organization is important when living with ADHD. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program

 

The article, “How to Declutter with an ADHD Brain: Organization Solutions for Real Life” by Linda Roggli looks at how individuals can declutter their ADHD life through simple solutions.  She states,

“More than half of adults with ADHD say disorganization is a serious problem, and 40% of women over the age of 40 say disorganization is their most urgent ADHD issue. Our ADHD brains are prone to clutter for a number of reasons: poor working memory, weak impulse control, and access to services like Amazon that instantly fulfil our whims. When the sheer physical and emotional space consumed by clutter becomes unmanageable, it can get in the way of relationships, work, and mental health.”

To read the entire article, please click here

ADHD can be difficult and any tips to help organize and keep life simpler is a benefit.  Learning how to cope and create solutions is a key to having a successful life while having ADHD.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in ADHD Consulting.

 

ADHD Consulting Certification Article on ADHD and Remote Learning

Virtual schooling during the pandemic has been difficult for many families.  The adjustments of learning online and parents taking a more active role in the education of their children is a big shift, especially for working families.  Add the stress of computer glitches and other parental duties supervising their children’s progress plus the need of day care possibly, then one can see the numerous issues that can arise.  If one adds any learning disabilities, such as ADHD, then the situation is even worst.

Remote learning and teaching an ADHD child may be difficult for some parents. Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification

 

The article,  “Children with ADHD Adjust to Different Schooling” by Ryan Schmelz looks at some of the challenges.  He states,

“The organization Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or CHADD, and educational therapist Shari Gent, M.S., NCED released several takeaways from asking ADHD students about remote learning, including the need for time to socialize and take breaks from sitting, a regular schedule with teacher interactions, having a parent or adult present for younger students, recording sessions, and minimizing the number of platforms students and families need to learn. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Homeschooling families have been teaching through online programs and home for years.  It may be worth taking a few tips from these families.

Please also review AIHCP’s ADHD Consulting Certification.  Qualified professionals can earn a four year certification by passing the online and independent study courses.