Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Video on Pet Loss Grief

Losing a pet is a painful loss that many try to diminish.  The true reality is that losing a pet is like losing family.  One’s grief for this loss must be recognized and not reduced to such horrible statements as “he was just a dog” or “she was just a cat”

The American Academy of Grief Counseling offers a Pet Loss Grief Support Certification for qualified professionals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.  Please review the program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

Please also review the video on Pet Loss Grief Support

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Article on Issues Surrounding the Loss of a Pet

Dealing with pet loss is difficult for many people.  Many individuals go through multiple steps and phases of grief.  Some deal with certain aspects of the loss itself.

Losing a pet is never easy. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “5 Themes in How People Deal with Pet Loss” by Arash Emamzadeh looks at 5 particular themes of loss pet owners may lament in their mind.  He states,

“Unfortunately, these relationships sometimes end abruptly or tragically—such as when a pet dies or a helper animal has to be put down. As with any major loss, a period of suffering and grief is expected. But grieving the loss of a pet presents its own challenges; one such challenge is the lack of agreed-upon burial rituals and the problem of disenfranchised grief (grief not socially acknowledged or mourned publicly).”

To read the entire article, please click here

Pet loss can be a difficult time for a variety of reasons.  It is important to never dismiss this loss in others but to fully understand the impact of the loss on each individual

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on Grieving a Good Dog

Losing a dog is a painful life experience.  For some it happens multiple times, for others, the pain may be so great, it only happens once and they are unable to open up again.  The bond between human and canine is undeniable.  It is so strong that the love can be as strong as any love between family.  For those who truly understand it, the loss of a dog is the loss of family.  A dog is not owned, a dog is not a pet, but a family member that is loved and cherished.   Hence the loss of a dog can be a very agonizing loss.

Losing a dog is like losing family for many. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “How to Grieve for a Very Good Dog” by Annette McGivney looks closer at the grief experienced over the loss of a dog.  She states,

“When my yellow Lab died last spring, I was flattened by an overwhelming sadness that’s with me still. And that’s normal, experts say, because losing a pet is often one of the hardest yet least acknowledged traumas we’ll ever face.”

To read the entire article, please click here

If you would like to learn more about AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification, then please review and see if it matches your academic and professional goals. The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Article on the Short Life of a Dog

One of the saddest things is losing a dog.  Losing a dog is painful because over the 10 to 15 years the dog in our life, he or she becomes an everyday staple.  Many wish dogs could live longer.  This is one of the things to consider when owning a dog that one will not have them for a life time but a series of them.  This may be sad but also gives one a chance to share life with many more.

Unfortunately for dog lovers, dogs live a very short life. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Support Program

 

In novels, we see individuals who live almost like immortal lives.  Our lives are almost immortal like when compared to a dog’s life and it teaches us to appreciate them while they are here.  We need to smile on the bad days they misbehave or tear up a shoe and we need to appreciate the love and energy they show us.  We are their entire world and we need to enjoy everyday they are with us.

The article, “It’s not fair that a dog’s life is so short” by Linda Smith states,

“Over the years, friends had warned me that the decision to let a cherished pet go was one of the most difficult they had ever made. At the time, I would nod and agree and move on with my day. As my dog got older, however, and this reality neared for me, I listened more closely to those stories of pet loss from friends.”

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it matches your academic and professional programs.  The program is online and independent study and open to professionals seeking a four year certification to help others deal with the loss of a pet.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Article on Losing a Pet

Helping someone through the loss of a pet is something many consider trivial but it is not.  It is important to treat all losses as important and to learn how to help someone through listening and acknowledgement of their grief.

Good article on Pet Loss Grief. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your needs

 

The article, ‘LOSING A PET” from the USdesk looks at how to talk and listen to someone who loses a pet.  The article refers to some helpful ways to guide someone through the loss.  The article states,

“While losing a pet is painful and overwhelming, unfortunately, it can also be a very lonely process, as community support typically associated with death is absent when a pet dies. To make matters worse, grieving owners may feel embarrassed over the extent of their own heartbreak and feel ashamed to reach out to friends for comfort.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification

 

Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on Disenfranchised Grief and Pets

Many people who suffer pet loss are left without anyone to talk to.  Many dismiss their grief.  This type of disenfranchised grief is a common problem for pet owners.  The need for good pet loss counseling is a necessary need for these individuals.

Losing an animal is a true loss. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Certification

 

 

The power and impact of pet loss is best described in the article, “Disenfranchised grief: Why pet owners aren’t allowed to mourn” by Julie Mullins looks at disenfranchised grief of pet owners who lose a pet.  The article states,

“Put simply, the human-animal bond is unique. Pet owners experience unconditional love emanating from their companion animal; without judgment, and full of complete acceptance. Many clients and staff can be heard uttering, “I like animals more than people,” as they walk around the hospital (if you haven’t heard it, maybe you have said it). Clients and staff alike refer to these animals as “fur babies.” With more and more clients living alone, these fur babies play an even more important role in their owner’s life.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional needs.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Counseling.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on Losing a Pet

Pet loss is no different than other loss but it is sometimes dismissed and downgraded.  Losing a pet is like losing family and it should be treated as such.  If someone loses a dog or cat that has been with them for years and has been their closest companion, then the loss will hurt as if a person has died.

The loss of a pet can be traumatic and life altering. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “How to mourn the loss of a pet: ‘There are no rules, grief has no endpoint’” by Gemma White reviews how intense the loss of a pet can be.  She states,

“Owners can sometimes face indifference or a lack of understanding from those who may not understand the place their pet held in their lives. But whether dog, cat, horse or hamster, the loss of a pet can have a devastating effect.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on One’s Dying Dog

When we discover our dog is soon to die or will die within months, we start to prepare ourselves for that horrible day.  Anticipatory grief sets in as we await the time we dread.  We try to enjoy the good days and stretch out as much time left.

 

 

Waiting for one’s dog to let them know it is time to die is a sad journey. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification .

 

Waiting for one’s dog to let them know it is time to die is a sad journey. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

The article, “My Dog is Dying” from “What’s Your Grief” looks at the pain and questions surrounding this period.  The article states,

“And yet I know the inevitable is coming. I find myself bracing for it every day, hypervigilant and tense. I watch his every move like a hawk. Did he eat? How much did he eat? Does it look like he’s in pain? Is that tumor bigger than it was yesterday? On his bad days I find myself mentally preparing. I’ve brought myself to tears more than once thinking about my world without him. I think about his long, happy life. I remind myself that I don’t want him to suffer.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Losing a pet is difficult and it can take time to recover from.  Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on Home Euthanasia

Losing a pet is difficult.  The choice to put the pet down is also a difficult part of that process.  How to say goodbye and when is a sad time for pet owners.  Sometimes, letting one’s pet die at home is a nice way and is a possible service to make the pet more comfortable instead of the sad drive to the vet’s office.

Home Euthanasia for a pet is a new concept for some. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Grief Loss Support Certification

 

The article, “At-home euthanasia can provide comfort to pets, owners” by Kathryn Streeter looks deeper at euthanasia at home for pets.  She states,

“This prompted a hard family conversation about quality of life. It was time, we thought, and made the heart-wrenching decision to euthanise her. But there was one bright side: We were able to do so in a way that was best for Ezzy and for us: In the privacy, comfort and, given the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, safety, of our home.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on Sudden Loss of a Pet

Losing a pet due to old age and natural causes is difficult but losing one to an accident is even more heartbreaking.  Like any unexpected death it can cause trauma and intense grief.  It is every pet owners greatest fear to discover an unexpected death or a pet hit by a car.

The sudden loss of a pet can be traumatic and tragic. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “Coping with a pet’s accidental death — especially when you blame yourself” by Gavin Jenkins looks closer at personal stories of how others dealt with the sudden and tragic death of their pets.  He states, 

“Grieving the loss of a pet is often as painful as mourning a close friend or relative. But being responsible for and witnessing your pet’s death can add guilt, trauma and shame to the heartbreak. And as we discovered after Suzy died, this emotional toll impedes the grieving process.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.