Pet Loss Grief Support Counseling Program Blog on Time for a New Dog

Death and life are a cycle.  Ironically, joy and grief also coincide with each other.  The death of one loved one can be overlapped with the birth of another.  Pets are also an overlap of death and life.  Many individuals find new dogs or cats to love, while still grieving the loss of another.   Many individuals feel they may be replacing a past dog or cat, but the reality is, one is loving another while never forgetting the other.  It is like having multiple children.  No child replaces another but only enhances one’s life.

For many the decision for a new puppy can be difficult. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program

 

The article, “What I’ve Learned from Loving a New Dog While Grieving Another” by Annette McGivney looks at her journey of caring for a new dog, while still in the acute process of grieving the loss of another.  She states,

“Last April and May, I tried to live without a dog and focus entirely on grieving Sunny, but I soon found myself looking at puppies online at two in the morning. One thing led to another, and in early June I drove to Pueblo, Colorado, to pick up Trudy after a rescue organization reached out to me. My contact there knew I was planning to wait at least a year before bringing another dog into my life, but she convinced me to go for it. “This dog really needs someone who is active and can spend a lot of time with her,” she said. “You would be perfect.” Trudy’s elderly owner lived alone and had dementia. He had kept her isolated in a cement dog run for her entire young life.”

To read the entire article, please click here

The late comedian George Carlin once said, “life is a series of dogs”,  For many pet owners this is true.  It is not a series of replacements but a series of sharing life with new faces and one day hoping to see all those faces again together.

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief  Support Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Blog on Sudden Pet Loss

Like any death, sudden deaths cause extreme distress for people.  Unexpected loss is always painful and can lead to complications.  The same sudden loss of a beloved pet can be a horrible experience.  If one’s dog is hit, or cat is killed, or horse breaks a leg, can be unexpected and painful moments in anyone’s life.  Such sudden death should not be downplayed but respected and heard.

Losing a pet suddenly can cause complicated grief. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program

 

The article, “When death comes suddenly to a pet” by Katie Burns looks at the sudden death of a pet.  She states,

“In other cases, a pet owner might have been managing a pet’s underlying condition, and the pet dies suddenly from a fatal progression of that condition. In Florida, other notable causes of sudden unexpected death—but not unexplained death—are drowning in pools and even death by alligator attack.”

To review the entire article, please click here

There are so many ways our beloved animals can die.  If sudden, it can cause intense trauma and these feelings should not be kept in.  Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Blog on Prolonged Grief Disorder in Pet Loss

Prolonged grief disorder is a form of complicated grief.  The grief is not resolved.  While slightly different than depression, prolonged grief disorders disrupts the lives of individuals and prevents them from properly adjusting to the loss.   Pet owners can also face this type of disorder over the loss of a pet.

Pet loss can have complications for people in the grieving process. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “Can Bereaved Pet Owners Suffer Prolonged Grief Disorder?” by Hal Herzog, PhD, looks at how complication grief does not discriminate between pet loss and human loss.  He states,

“According to the DSM, prolonged grief disorder only occurs in response to “the death of a person who was close to the bereaved.” Bereaved pet owners are omitted. Yet, in a 2020 study of 395 functionally impaired bereaved pet owners published in the journal Psychiatry Research, Sherman Lee found that the patterns of their symptoms were the same as in individuals suffering prolonged grief disorder in response to the loss of a human companion.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Blog on the Pet Loss is True Loss

For too long the stigma of grieving a pet as if losing a family member was looked upon as abnormal.  This view is changing now and the grief of losing a pet is becoming more normally accepted as a significant loss.  Too many times in the past it was marginalized as something small but the reality is pets are family and a loss of a pet is a painful loss.

The loss of a pet is a true loss. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your goals

 

The article, “Why it’s time to normalise grieving the loss of a pet” by Evalyn Lewin looks at why it is time to no longer disenfranchise pet loss.  She states,

“If your loved one is grieving the loss of their pet, Magri recommends acknowledging their pain and validating their feelings. If you’re the one struggling after the loss of a pet, reach out to people in similar situations by joining Facebook pages dedicated to pet loss, or by attending support groups or counselling. And if you’re worried about your mental health, talk to your GP.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Blog on Helping Children Grieve a Pet

It can be very difficult to finally say goodbye to a dog or cat or any pet.   It is something that requires much thought and considerations.  It is not only about one’s feelings but also for the best interests of one’s pet family.  It is maybe one of the toughest decisions to finally say goodbye and is very painful.  Teaching children how to say goodbye is key.

Children need help grieving pets. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support

 

The article, “These three simple things helped my kids grieve after our pet died” by Jessie Harrold looks at how to help children say goodbye.  He states,

“We spent the days and weeks after our pup passed telling stories, creating art, and poring over pictures of Roxy. It wasn’t until my son started having impromptu “funerals” on our family outings that we realized how important these little rituals of grieving were to his ability to process something as complex and overwhelming as loss.”

To review the article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Counseling Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals looking for a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support

Pet Loss Grief Support Video on a Pet’s Last Days

Losing a pet is painful but worrying about the right things to do before the pet dies can be difficult.  Anticipatory grief may begin to enter and we may lose valuable time with our cat, horse or dog.  It is important to make our pets last days as wonderful as possible as well as make the proper decision when to say goodbye.  This is easier said then done unfortunately.

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

 

Please also review the video below

Pet Loss Grief Support Blog on Getting a Another Pet

There is fear in many pet owner hearts that if they get a new pet then they are replacing the old.  This is common also with widows or widowers.  The reality the dog or cat is not being replaced.  Nothing can replace a beloved pet.  No new dog or cat can ever be the same but one can love more than one.  One can form new and unique bonds and share one’s hearts with other beautiful dogs and cats.  Always treasure the individual but try not to close your heart to others.

A new dog is not a replacement but something unique. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “If you’re denying yourself the love of a new pet after a loss, please reconsider in 2022” by Dana Perino looks at finding the room in one’s heart to love another dog or cat in one’s life.  She states,

“My mind flashed forward to a future without a dog — a human survival instinct to protect yourself against future heartaches. That would be fine. I could do it. I’d have to if I lost Percy so soon after falling in love with him. Fortunately, none of that came true.”

Her story of her own loss and experience can serve as an example to love more and not close.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on What Not to Say to One Grieving a Loss of a Pet

When people lose a pet, most ignore it as a real grief or loss.  Instead individuals may say a multitude of things that discredit the loss or lessen its importance.  It is important to recognize the loss and the value of the pet to the person in grief counseling.  It is essential to understand that pets are family to many people and deserve the respect the held within the family unit.  Losses of pets can be as painful as any other loss.

Pet loss needs to be respected and supported. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Support Certification

The article, “What Not To Say To People Grieving A Sick, Lost Or Dead Pet” by Monica Torres looks at what not to say to someone who lost a pet.  She states,

“For so many people, a pet is a member of the family, and the loss can be felt even more deeply than some human losses. “It’s really dismissive to minimize the loss as ‘less than’ or not valid,” said Jennifer Breslow, a New York City-based psychotherapist who works with clients dealing with the loss of a pet.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Certification Article on Home Euthanasia

Putting a dog, cat, horse, or any pet down is a painful decision.  It is something that takes much thought and love in regards to the pets condition and also one’s own anguish.  It is definitely not one of life’s happiest moments but in those moments, we find our true love for each other in the final goodbye.  The goodbyes used to be very sterile and informal.  The dog or cat was taken back never to be seen again.  Fortunately, now one can stand side by side or even receive the ashes of a loved pet.  Even so, now euthanasia is offered at home in some cases.  This is a difficult decision but may also be a more comforting one for many.

Saying good bye is a day we all dread. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “At-home euthanasia can provide comfort to pets and owners” by Kathryn Streeter looks closer at how a pet owner can utilize home euthanasia for one’s beloved pet.  She states,

“Psychotherapist and thanatologist Andrea Warnick has experienced both clinic and at-home euthanasia when her cats were terminally ill. “I think [at-home euthanasia] is a wonderful option because at this point a pet is pretty sick, and actually transporting them to a vet’s office can be anxiety-provoking and uncomfortable,” says Warnick, whose practice in Canada, Andrea Warnick Consulting, focuses on supporting grieving children, youths and adults.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Specialist Certification Article on Pet Loss and Coping

For many losing a pet is like losing a child.  A pet represents to many the only opportunity to experience a type of parenthood.  The pet is their life and for some, their only friend.  Hence the loss becomes more stronger for those who are attached to their pet.  This is not unhealthy but a bond of love that may be different than human love but still nonetheless is love.

Losing a pet can be traumatic. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Specialist Certification

 

The article, “How to Grieve the Death of a Pet” from Cleveland Clinic’s HealthEssentials takes a closer look at how to better cope when losing a pet.  The article states,

“Given how much comfort pets bring, it’s understandable that losing them can be emotionally devastating. “Our animals become a part of our family,” says Dr. Sullivan. “They provide unconditional love and support, which is something that people don’t get from a lot of different places.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Pets are family.  When individuals lessen the impact of the loss of a pet they show their lack of empathy but also lack of understanding.  Some may never experience the love one can have for an animal that is truly sad, but for those who do, we all too well understand the deep pain of losing a pet.

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Specialist Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.