Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on Pet Grief and Guilt

Losing a pet, especially a dog is a big loss.  People should not feel guilty in sharing their grief.  The loss can be as painful as losing a family member and should not be shelved away or not discussed as secondary to a human life.  This type of disenfranchisement can hurt individuals grieving their pet or dog.  It does not permit them to grieve and discuss the loss and how it has affected their lives.  It is important to recognize pet loss in a person’s life.

Losing a pet, cat or dog is a big loss. It is like losing family. Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “My Beloved Dog Just Died. I Don’t Know How To Grieve Without Feeling Guilty.” by Ann Gorewitz discusses her grief and guilt for grieving her pet.  She states,

“Our pets’ lives have value ― they matter! ― even though society often trivializes our relationships with them. And though I feel like I’m not supposed to grieve Cassie’s death as intensely or profoundly as I do ― especially during a pandemic when so many other truly awful things are happening ― her life and the loss of it is momentous to me, and maybe more so because of COVID-19.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on the Impact of Losing a Dog

The loss of a pet, especially a dog, cat or horse can be devastating.  It is not something to be tossed to the side.  It cannot be compared or lessened to the loss of a family member because pets are family.  The loss of a dog especially can be very traumatic to a family.  A dog plays a special role in the family’s life.  In many ways, a dog from puppy to death is like having a child and losing him or her.  The attachment and love is real and should not be mocked or ridiculed.  Yet, people feel ashamed at times to express this love and pain for fear of ridicule.

The loss of a dog can be very traumatic. Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic needs

It is important to not reduce the impact of a loss of a dog or pet.  The article, “Why losing a dog can be harder than losing a relative or friend” by Frank McAndrew states,

“Research has confirmed that for most people, the loss of a dog is, in almost every way, comparable to the loss of a human loved one.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional standards.

 

Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on Explaining a Pet’s Death

Great article on talking to a child about the death of a pet.  The death of a pet is a horrible loss but is also usually the first death experience for a child.  It is important to properly grieve the loss but to also use it as teaching moment to explain death.   While a teaching moment may be very difficult for the loss of a dog, horse or cat, it may be easier if it is a goldfish, or hampster.

Explaining to a child how a family dog or cat died can be a difficult thing.  Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification
Explaining to a child how a family dog or cat died can be a difficult thing. Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “The Dog Isn’t Sleeping: How To Talk With Children About Death” by Cody Turner states,

“My parents exchanged pained glances. I know now that life had put them in an impossible bind. Mingo had been dying for months and suffering for weeks. The vet urged euthanasia then and there. My parents reluctantly but humanely agreed. But how to tell me? So they didn’t, hoping to wait until after my birthday.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on Mourning a Pet

Grieving a pet is critical to recovery.  With pets being so much as like family, if one does not take the time to grieve the loss of a pet, then one can face further grief complications.  Allowing oneself to grieve the loss of a pet can help one ultimately recover and accept the loss in a healthy fashion

Please also review our pet loss grief counseling program
Please also review our pet loss grief counseling program

The article, Paw Prints: Grieving process can bring you relief from pet’s death, by 

“Most people love their pets enough to consider them members of the family. Pets provide companionship, emotional support and unconditional love. When a beloved pet dies, it’s natural to feel sorrow and experience grief.”

To read the entire article, please click here

For children, the death of a pet may be the first experience with death. A child may blame himself, his parents or the veterinarian for not saving the pet. A child may also feel guilty, depressed and frightened that others he loves may be taken from him.

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification

Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification Article on Pet Loss

Good article on dealing with the pain and grief of losing a pet.  Too many losing a pet is more than just losing an animal, but a friend and family member.

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification
Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification

The article, HOW TO COPE WITH THE UNIQUE GRIEF OF LOSING A PET, by Gwendolyn Purdom, states,

“The relationships you have with your pets are different than any other relationship in your life. While your differing views on politics or your last boyfriend can complicate your bond with your mom, you and your dog (presumably) have no such issues.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pet Loss Grief Counseling Certification