Pastoral Thanatlogy Article on End of Life Options

End of life care can be stressful and sad for family members.  They need to know the options necessary for their loved one.   There are many routes to take depending on one’s situation in caring for the loved one.

Knowing your end of life options is important.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your goals
Knowing your end of life options is important. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your goals

The article, “6 Different End-of-Life Care Options to Know if You or a Loved One Is Sick” reviews the many types of care from hospice to palliative to anything in between.  The article states,

“No one wants to think about end-of-life care for themselves or a loved one. But when it comes down to it, end-of-life care is another important way of looking after a person’s health both mentally and physically. “It’s about finding the right fit and putting a team in place to help you achieve your goals,” Scott Kaiser, M.D., a family physician and geriatrician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California, tells SELF. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your professional goals.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Facing Death

When facing death, people need more than physical care but also emotional as well as spiritual care.  Part of that care entails helping the person transition from this life to the next.  Pastoral Thanatology is the science of helping people face death.

Pastoral Thanatology looks to help others face death.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
Pastoral Thanatology looks to help others face death. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, “Why help is needed when facing death” by John Dolan looks to answer the question of why individuals need help when facing death.  The article states,

“In my nearly 30 years as a priest, I have had the privilege of visiting the homebound, and those in convalescent homes, hospice and/or in palliative care. I have witnessed many families gathered together, accompanying their parents or grandparents as they died peacefully.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Pastoral Thanatology CertificationArticle on the Ethics of End of Life Care

Good article about the many ethics of end of life care.  End of life care has many spiritual, cultural and religious ideals surrounding it where one must care with proper boundaries and understanding of those traditions.  Furthermore, there is a list of ethical care regarding the physical aspects of end of life.  This leads to multiple ethical rules and regulations one must follow.

What are key ethics in end of life care? Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
What are key ethics in end of life care?
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, The Ethics of End-of-Life Care, by Joe Darrah states,

“Regardless of one’s healthcare condition, contemplating end-of-life care is never an easy thought process for the patient or loved ones. For nurses who are tasked with helping to guide decisions related to the initiation of palliative care and advanced directives, no two scenarios are the same and ethical dilemmas can often arise. ADVANCE recently spoke with three nurses who shared their most frequent types of ethical decisions that they’re confronted with and how they have attempted to navigate specific encounters.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification to learn more and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

 

End of Life Care Article on Healthcare and Dying

Extending medical aid that is affordable and even covered is essential to the dignity of any American.  It entitles the American the care he or she needs in addressing comfort and peaceful transition in death.   Voters this election clearly cared about medical and end of life issues in their support of healthcare friendly candidates.

End of Life Care should not only be available for the wealthy.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
End of Life Care should not only be available for the wealthy. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, “The Growing Acceptance of Medical Aid in Dying” by Kim Callinan illustrates this necessity and call for better healthcare to the dying.  The article states,

“While expanding and protecting health care was the number-one issue for voters on Nov. 6, what has gone unreported is that elected officials can now safely run on the issue of expanding and protecting end-of-life care options. For decades, lawmakers feared that sponsoring medical aid-in-dying bills that would allow terminally ill adults to have the option to peacefully end their suffering would harm their chances of getting re-elected. This year’s elections proved those concerns false.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review the Pastoral Thanatology Program at AIHCP.  End of Life Care training is available for qualified professionals.

Pastoral Thanatology Article on the Cost of Hospice

Hospice is good for anyone who is terminally dying but the cost can sometimes be an obstacle.  In learning who pays for hospice and who is eligible is important.  Many never utilize this service for fear of price yet the service is so critical to living one’s life till the end instead of dying in a foreign and sterile place.

Hospice can make one's final days more peaceful. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program
Hospice can make one’s final days more peaceful. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program

The article, “The Costs of Entering Hospice Care” by Maryalene LaPonsie states,

“IN 2016, MORE THAN 1 million Medicare beneficiaries died while receiving hospice care, according to data compiled by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. “Few people know that hospice is not just for the patient, but for the family,” says Edo Banach, president and CEO of NHPCO, a nonprofit representing hospice and palliative care programs and professionals.”

To read the entire article, please click here

The benefits of hospice are great and to be deterred because of price is something that is unfortunate.  It is many ways should be a right to die with care and compassion at the hands of trained hospice caregivers.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program and see if it meets your educational needs.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Article on End of Life Ritual

Death is the ultimate mystery.  it captures every essence of humanity.  It is spiritual and physical, as well as mental.  In this, society has attempted to understand the true nature of death and how to face it.  Through this, multiple rituals have developed over the centuries to help the individual, as well as the family, to face death.   In this, we can come to a true understanding why we as a society need death rituals.

End of life rituals are important to society. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
End of life rituals are important to society. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, “Why we need end-of-life ritual” looks into this important aspect of Pastoral Care of the dying and why it is needed in society.

The article states, “Rituals help people to mark and make sense of the big life changes that we all go through, such as births, marriages and deaths. Rituals work when the people involved understand what is going on. For example, for a non-religious parent, it may make sense to have a secular baby-naming ceremony, rather than a religious christening or baptism to welcome their baby to the community.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pastoral Thanatology Program to learn more and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on More Empathetic Doctors

Great article about a doctor and his sister.  Learning from grief that was her own, he was able to utilize that emotion as empathy for others.  Pastoral Thanatology, Grief Counseling and other care giving modalities are all founded on empathy and the ability to utilize it.  Please also review also review our program and see if it matches your professional needs.

Doctors can also treat the soul than just the dying body. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
Doctors can also treat the soul than just the dying body. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, “Grief as My Guide: How My Sister Made Me a Better Doctor” by Joseph Stern states. 

“As I left the room, Meghan thanked me and said this was the first doctor’s appointment she had had in a long time where she didn’t cry. I never used to cry when speaking with patients. I would gird myself, push forward, distract myself with new and pressing problems to fix; I focused on technical, rather than human, matters. Now, I told Meghan that I would cry for us both. My sister was present in that room, in the patient sitting before me and in the way I was newly able to comfort and reassure her.”

To read the entire article, please click here

This article shows that sometimes the best way to under empathy is to experience it literally yourself.  Doctors can be caring and involved.  They can learn better patient skills through various Pastoral Thanatology Programs, as well as Grief Counseling Programs.  Please review AIHCP’s programs in both Grief Counseling and Pastoral Thanatology

Pastoral Thantology Program Article on Hospice

Good article on how hospice helps the terminally ill. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The video, How hospices care for the terminally ill, goes into detail about how hospice can help terminally ill face death with comfort and dignity.

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

To review the video, please click here

Too many times, individuals pass up the opportunity to experience the care that only hospice can provide.

If you would like to learn more, then consider becoming certified in Pastoral Thanatology.

AIHCP offers a certification program in Pastoral Thanatology that can help health professionals meet the needs of their patients from a pastoral perspective.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Dying at Home

Good article on how more Americans are learning of the luxury and peace of dying at home if possible over the sterile environment of dying in the hospital. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program 

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, Fewer Americans are spending their final days in the hospital and more are dying at home, by Melissa Healy states,

“The American way of dying seems to have become less frantic, desperate and expensive.

That’s the upshot of a new study that finds that seniors insured by Medicare who died in 2015 were less likely to do so in a hospital and more likely to pass away in a home or other community setting than those who died in 2000.”

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Hospice

Good article on hospice and its many values. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

The article, The History Of Hospice: A Different Kind Of Health ‘Care’, by Nicole Fisher states

“100 years ago today, the movement behind hospice care as born. Or rather, the women who would create a fundamentally different kind of health care was born. Dame Cicely Saunders was a dynamic woman who forever altered the way we think about end of life care.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program