Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on End of Life Discussions.

A discussion about cancer is everyone’s greatest fear.  Noone wishes to face the reality of death and its possibility.  Cancer brings that.  In the case of a loved one, discussing what could happen is even more painful.  It is important to learn how to talk to our loved ones about cancer or the great “what if”.  It is important to have that conversation without losing hope.

End of life discussions are difficult but important. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “How to Talk to a Loved One Dying From Cancer” by John Edwards states,

On the other hand, avoiding talking about death can create unnecessary tension, irritation, and that can detach you from having some memorable moments with the people you care about. And it will only elevate the sense of loneliness, excessive fear, and sadness for both of you.

To read the entire article, click here

End of life discussions can be very difficult but they are important.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your professional and academic goals.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Palliative Care

Great article on what Palliative Care as part of the overall Hospice care.  Palliative care is more diverse in that it deals with the serious  illness at any phase, helping many recover.  Sometimes, it leads to ultimately hospice in itself, but Palliative Care can be part of your medical team.

Palliative Care addresses serious illness at any phase. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program and see if it matches your professional goals

The article, “A Good Life And A Good Death: What Is Palliative Care?: by Camel Wroth states,

“Palliative care is attending to the physical, emotional and spiritual suffering of patients and families who are dealing with a serious illness. Hospice is a type of palliative care that we provide in the last six months of life.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Program

Through Pastoral care, one can better help others face death from not only a mental way but also a spiritual.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Ambiguous Grief and Terminal Illness

Grief and loss are difficult themes.  It is hard for the individual to overcome basic loss, but complications can even make grief more difficult.   One time of grief is ambiguous grief, or the type of grief that is lost in between, or the grey areas of loss.

With ambiguous grief you live in a grey area of doubt, hope, despair and sometimes joy, but ultimately you are preparing yourself for the end
With ambiguous grief you live in a grey area of doubt, hope, despair and sometimes joy, but ultimately you are preparing yourself for the end

The classic example of someone who is dying slowly is an example of ambiguous grief.  The family is left with the long awaited death, but still try to keep hope.  The family sees the person suffer, with some hoping for the suffering to end, with others sometimes unknowingly selfishly cannot let go.

The purgatory of ambiguous grief can later lead to other complications.  Some may feel guilty over the death of a loved one for having caregiver fatigue, while others may feel guilty they wished the person would finally die to find peace.

Complicated grief can emerge from many of these scenarios later in the grieving process.   For some though, ambiguous grief is just a period of conflicting emotions where one finds joy then sadness with also hope and despair.

While dealing with long term illness of a family member, family members need to just be free to feel.  They should not feel guilty or resentful, but respect the process, cherish the time left, and allow the grieving process to continue.   In fact, such long term deaths, prepare many for the death of the a loved, and while the loss is still impactful, it is not sudden.   The grief process has already begun well before the death.

Terminal illness is death that has yet to come. Grief hence can become ambiguous in nature. Please review our Pastoral Thanatology program
Terminal illness is death that has yet to come. Grief hence can become ambiguous in nature. Please review our Pastoral Thanatology program

When dealing with long term grief over a terminal illness of a loved one, it may be good to consult a certified Grief Counselor or speak with a someone educated in Pastoral Thanatology.   One can find the guidance and relief they need during this process.

 

Please review our Pastoral Thanatology program, as well as our Grief Counseling program to see if they meet your academic and professional needs.

Pastoral Thanatology Program Article on Palliative Care and SNF

Good article looking at how skilled nursing facilities could also play a role in end of life care, especially in palliative care where the treatment is still in process.

Good article on SNF and palliative care. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your needs
Good article on SNF and palliative care. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your needs

The article, “Turn-Key CEO: Why Palliative Care Must Soon Come to Skilled Nursing” by Maggie Flynn looks at how SNF have in the past have their own limitations but could in the future be an excellent fit.  The article states,

“The first thing I think we would do would be really look at it from a regulatory perspective, to better understand the credentialing process, and how to work with SNF concentrations. Because some of our partners do have preferred SNFs, and have expressed serious interest in having this type of service in that SNF population.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your professional and academic needs

Pastoral Thanatology Training Article on Helping the Dying

Good article on a doctor’s bedside manner and how all physicians should be trained in pastoral care.  Doctors, as well as nurses, need to have the empathy and understanding to help others face death.  Too many times, healthcare professionals are too sterile in their demeanor with the dying.

Compassion and understanding is important in helping the dying. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Training
Compassion and understanding is important in helping the dying. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Training

The article, “A chance encounter with a sand painting helped me learn how to doctor patients I knew I would lose” Sunita Puri, M.D. states,

“As a palliative care doctor, I spend much of my time face-to-face with pain and suffering, debilitating disease and death. When I began my training, I thought I was comfortable with the idea of mortality, and with the notion that fighting death at all costs wasn’t the sole purpose of medicine. But I hadn’t expected that the type of medicine I’d chosen to practice would require a strength and perspective that medical training hadn’t offered.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Training

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Palliative and Hospice Care Differences

Good article explaining the key differences between hospice care and palliative care.  It is important to know which program is best for you or a loved one and to use them correctly.  Ultimately, it is about the best care and comfort for the situation.

As we grow, knowing what is best for ourselves is key.  For our family and ourselves, knowing whether Hospice or Palliative Care is best for us, is also key.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
As we grow, knowing what is best for ourselves is key. For our family and ourselves, knowing whether Hospice or Palliative Care is best for us, is also key. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “‘That Good Night’ Perfectly Explains How Palliative Care Differs From Hospice” by Judy Stone states,

“That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour,” reminded me how poorly the U.S. deals with palliative care—a specialty that focuses on symptom relief—let alone end of life decisions and hospice care. The two terms are different and commonly misunderstood.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification Program and see how it matches your academic and professional goals.

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Hospice

So many think they are not eligible for Hospice and so many more think they have to die to enter into it.  These are both myths.  Hospice is available for many and is not necessarily a death sentence.  It is not about giving up on life but living life.

Hospice is not about dying but is about living as best you can.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Hospice is not about dying but is about living as best you can. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “Mark Harvey: You may qualify for hospice — and you’re not required to die” by Mark Harvey,  looks at the true realities behind hospice.  The article states,

So, basically, hospice care is not about trying to cure a terminal illness; it’s about improving the quality of the life that the patient has left. And it does a remarkable job of doing that.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification to learn more and also potentially become certified.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Discussing Death

Approaching the question of death with a healthy mindset is important.  Too many times, death and dying is put off and ignored.  This can create untimely preparation and confusion surrounded by the sadness.  Hence talking about death is important.

Discussions about death and dying are important.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Discussions about death and dying are important. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article,”Changing the National Conversation around Death” looks at the importance of discussing death and dying.  It states,

“From anti-aging beauty regimens to strict diets and medical screenings, Western culture places immense value on the quality and preservation of life. Death, however, is a subject largely absent from daily conversation, and when raised, it evokes fear and anxiety.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification program to learn more about death and dying and also to become certified.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on End of Life Counseling

Good article on how end of life counseling can help individuals can face death and end of life with more peace and confidence.  End of life care is becoming recognized as something more and more important in today’s world.  Pastoral Thanatology is a way to help individuals face death and help families cope with the death of a loved one.

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “They made me feel like a person”: Palliative care counseling changes lives for patients, families” by Holly Gainer states,

“The patients are not the only ones who receive care at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Counseling for the patients and their family members is an integral part of the UAB Center for Palliative and Supportive Care.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Also please review AIHCP’s Pastoral Thanatology Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.  Pastoral Thanatology is becoming more and more critical for behavioral health professionals and as well those who work with the dying.  If you would like to learn more, again, please review the program.

Pastoral Thanatlogy Article on End of Life Options

End of life care can be stressful and sad for family members.  They need to know the options necessary for their loved one.   There are many routes to take depending on one’s situation in caring for the loved one.

Knowing your end of life options is important.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your goals
Knowing your end of life options is important. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your goals

The article, “6 Different End-of-Life Care Options to Know if You or a Loved One Is Sick” reviews the many types of care from hospice to palliative to anything in between.  The article states,

“No one wants to think about end-of-life care for themselves or a loved one. But when it comes down to it, end-of-life care is another important way of looking after a person’s health both mentally and physically. “It’s about finding the right fit and putting a team in place to help you achieve your goals,” Scott Kaiser, M.D., a family physician and geriatrician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California, tells SELF. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology program and see if it matches your professional goals.