Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Palliative Care and Assisted Suicide

Good article on the importance of funding palliative care and assisting life and dealing with suffering than ending life through assisted suicide.  Pastoral Care is about preserving life and helping others find comfort in the end of life.

Pastoral Care never endorses assisted suicide but looks for helping others overcome. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatlogy Certification

The article, “Catholic Medical Association: fund palliative care, not assisted suicide”  by JD Flynn states,

“Palliative care involves medical care and pain management for the symptoms of those suffering from a serious illness, and refraining from taking actions that directly take the life of the patient, as opposed to the practices of assisted suicide and euthanasia.”

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification and see if it meets your needs

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Palliative and Hospice Care Differences

Good article explaining the key differences between hospice care and palliative care.  It is important to know which program is best for you or a loved one and to use them correctly.  Ultimately, it is about the best care and comfort for the situation.

As we grow, knowing what is best for ourselves is key.  For our family and ourselves, knowing whether Hospice or Palliative Care is best for us, is also key.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
As we grow, knowing what is best for ourselves is key. For our family and ourselves, knowing whether Hospice or Palliative Care is best for us, is also key. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “‘That Good Night’ Perfectly Explains How Palliative Care Differs From Hospice” by Judy Stone states,

“That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour,” reminded me how poorly the U.S. deals with palliative care—a specialty that focuses on symptom relief—let alone end of life decisions and hospice care. The two terms are different and commonly misunderstood.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification Program and see how it matches your academic and professional goals.

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Hospice

So many think they are not eligible for Hospice and so many more think they have to die to enter into it.  These are both myths.  Hospice is available for many and is not necessarily a death sentence.  It is not about giving up on life but living life.

Hospice is not about dying but is about living as best you can.  Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Hospice is not about dying but is about living as best you can. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “Mark Harvey: You may qualify for hospice — and you’re not required to die” by Mark Harvey,  looks at the true realities behind hospice.  The article states,

So, basically, hospice care is not about trying to cure a terminal illness; it’s about improving the quality of the life that the patient has left. And it does a remarkable job of doing that.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification to learn more and also potentially become certified.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on End of Life Counseling

Good article on how end of life counseling can help individuals can face death and end of life with more peace and confidence.  End of life care is becoming recognized as something more and more important in today’s world.  Pastoral Thanatology is a way to help individuals face death and help families cope with the death of a loved one.

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, “They made me feel like a person”: Palliative care counseling changes lives for patients, families” by Holly Gainer states,

“The patients are not the only ones who receive care at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Counseling for the patients and their family members is an integral part of the UAB Center for Palliative and Supportive Care.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Also please review AIHCP’s Pastoral Thanatology Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.  Pastoral Thanatology is becoming more and more critical for behavioral health professionals and as well those who work with the dying.  If you would like to learn more, again, please review the program.

Pastoral Thanatology CertificationArticle on the Ethics of End of Life Care

Good article about the many ethics of end of life care.  End of life care has many spiritual, cultural and religious ideals surrounding it where one must care with proper boundaries and understanding of those traditions.  Furthermore, there is a list of ethical care regarding the physical aspects of end of life.  This leads to multiple ethical rules and regulations one must follow.

What are key ethics in end of life care? Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
What are key ethics in end of life care?
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, The Ethics of End-of-Life Care, by Joe Darrah states,

“Regardless of one’s healthcare condition, contemplating end-of-life care is never an easy thought process for the patient or loved ones. For nurses who are tasked with helping to guide decisions related to the initiation of palliative care and advanced directives, no two scenarios are the same and ethical dilemmas can often arise. ADVANCE recently spoke with three nurses who shared their most frequent types of ethical decisions that they’re confronted with and how they have attempted to navigate specific encounters.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification to learn more and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Hospice Issues

Good article on when hospice care fall short

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article,This Was Not the Good Death We Were Promised, by Karen Brown states

“When my father was dying of pancreatic cancer last summer, I often curled up with him in the adjustable hospital bed set up in his bedroom. As we watched episodes of “The Great British Baking Show,” I’d think about all the things I couldn’t promise him.

I couldn’t promise that the book he’d been working on would ever be published. I couldn’t promise he would get to see his childhood friends from England one more time.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Dying at Home

Dying peacefully at home is anyone’s ultimate death wish, but so many end up needlessly in hospitals in a sterile and cold environment.   Sometimes this is necessary but many times it can avoided with better planning.

Many elderly never get to die at home. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Many elderly never get to die at home. Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, Most people want to die at home, but many land in hospitals getting unwanted care, by Andrew MacPherson and Ravi B. Parikh, states

“Where do you want to die? When asked, the vast majority of Americans answer with two words: “At home.”

Despite living in a country that delivers some of the best health care in the world, we often settle for end-of-life care that is inconsistent with our wishes and administered in settings that are unfamiliar, even dangerous.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Regrets of the Dying

The dying can have many regrets.  Believe it or not one is actually not talking about or preparing for dying itself

What are some regrets of the dying? Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
What are some regrets of the dying? Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

The article, These are the most common regrets of the dying, by Natalie Healey states,

In the shadow of death: life as a palliative care nurse

Great article on the life and issues of a palliative nurse.  Please review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification
Great article on the life and issues of a palliative nurse. Please review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification

Karuna Hospice nurses Renee Wilson and Lea-Anne Tuaoi on finding joy and meaning in a life lived in the presence of death.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.abc.net.au

Great article about the life of a palliative nurse and her stories about death and dealing with the dying. A very personal story that goes well beyond the science of medicine and care, but also to the spiritual and emotional elements of caring for the dying

If you would like to learn more about AIHCP’s Pastoral Thanatology Certification, then please review

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Seizing a Medicare Moment To Improve End-of-Life Care

This article looks at the future of hospice care and government aid.  Please review our pastoral thanatology certification
This article looks at the future of hospice care and government aid. Please review our pastoral thanatology certification

 

It is crucial to ask people about what they want

Sourced through Scoop.it from: time.com

Good news with Medicare and end of life care as many services will now be covered.  With so many options now open to the elderly, physicians can help patients find what they need and want

If you would like to learn more about our Pastoral Thanatology Certification, then please review the program

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