Grief Counseling Certification Article on Sudden Loss

A sudden loss can be tragic and devastating.  It can upheave one’s life and make one search for existential answers of how and why.  It can be so catastrophic that it can push one into a deep trauma and depression over the sudden loss.  Grief in these cases have a chance of becoming prolonged and becoming possibly depressive in nature.

A sudden loss can send a person into a whirlwind of emotion and worries. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification

 

The article, “How to Help a Loved One Through Sudden Loss” by Julie Halpert looks into how to help someone who experiences a sudden loss.  She states,

“With a sudden loss, the bereaved find themselves immediately inundated with new and mounting responsibilities. Helping ease that burden can be invaluable. Dr. Cormier suggested leading with language like: “I’d love to help. Does anything occur to you that may be useful?” If they don’t provide suggestions, you can be specific: Ask if you can bring dinner, mow the lawn or pick up groceries. You can also provide a welcome distraction, offering to go for a walk with the bereaved or take them out to dinner.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional needs and goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in grief counseling.

 

Grief Counseling Certification Video on Depression and Bi Polar Disorder

Two types of depression that exist are Clinical Depression and Bi Polar Disorder.  Clinical Depression is a constant state of emotional sadness with in most cases no true cause.  Bi Polar is a swing of moods with certain manic episodes throughout the year where one is not depressed but very active, followed by a depressed state.   Licensed therapists are needed to treat both.

If you would like to learn more about AIHCP and its Grief Counseling Certification, then please review the program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a grief counselor.

 

 

Please review the video below

Grief Counseling Certification Video on Social Grief

When national tragedies or disasters occur, the nation as a whole can grief.  Social reactions to loss that collectively affect the majority can negatively affect larger populations.  Social grief is a reality for many who experience grief at a collective level.

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Grief Counseling.

Grief Counseling Certification Video on Grief Monsters

Bad memories or hauntings can be difficult while grieving.  Any type of memory can bring one back to the loss.  Grief Monsters are these type of memories that resurface and if not confronted or properly understood can cause big problems.

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a Grief Counselor.

Please review the video below

Grief Counseling Certification Program Blog on the Loss of a Grandparent

One of the first family losses a child experiences is the loss of a grandparent.  This loss has ripples throughout the family dynamic and resets many traditions.

First it is twofold.  It affects not only grandchild, but the parents as well who have lost their own parent.  A twofold grief that manifests itself on two generations can be difficult within a home as parents and children grieve the loss.   The intensity will depend on the bonds and closeness between individuals but for many losing a grandparent is a significant loss.  For some, a grandparent is like a parent.  Others they are nevertheless important figures in one’s raising and development.  Some play more key and active roles in their grandchildren’s daily life.  This will have an affect on the person and his or her loss.

Losing a grandparent is usually a person’s first serious meeting with death. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Program

 

The death of a grandparent can occur very young or for those blessed, later in life.   The time, place and details surrounding the loss can all affect the loss as well.  One who loses a grandparent unexpectedly as opposed to over a long terminal illness will experience the loss differently.  Classically, most will experience a loss of a grandparent due to terminal illness and be around their teen to 20s, but for those who fall outside those parameters will all experience different types of reaction to loss.

Secondary losses and exposure to grief maybe for the first time manifest.  The person may have difficult process understanding loss and the shock it causes.  For many, close relatives were always immune to death and dying but suddenly, the death of a grandparent can shock a grandchild into understanding the reality of death.  This may come with difficulty especially since it is the first real experience with death.  Life will change because of this loss.  Family dinners, or holiday traditions will change.  This can be difficult to process especially when this is the first experience with death and the person has to come to grips with the change in life.

Grandparent bonds can be very strong for many. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification

 

Death is very terrifying but it is part of life.  Losing a grandparent reminds individuals of the reality of death for the first time in many cases.  It teaches one how to grieve the loss of someone close and how grief feels throughout its many phases.  It is a great pain but also a teaching moment that will later prepare one for the death of parents, spouses and close friends.  Pain is part of this fallen world and it is sad that losses to those we love occur, but grandparents represent the usually the first loss in life that has real meaning.

If you would like to learn more about Grief Counseling Training and how to help others, then please review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a Grief Counselor.

 

 

Grief Counseling Certification Video on Disenfranchised Grief

Unfortunately, many individuals and their grief are ignored, downplayed or ridiculed.  Those who face such grief situations are considered disenfranchised.  Individuals deserve to have every loss accepted and respected but sometimes due to the nature of the loss or type of loss, they feel embarrassed or belittled.

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking to a four year certification in grief counseling

 

Please review the video below

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Divorce and Grief

Divorce can be crippling to many.  The heartbreak can devastate a person.  The secondary losses of comfort and security are also immense as a person is displaced and thrown into a world of chaos.  Divorce is one of the more stressful and sad events anyone can go through and it is important to know who to talk to and how to better cope during this chaotic time

The grief of divorce has many layers. Please also review AIHCPs’ Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your goals

 

The article, “Understanding Gray Divorce and the Grieving Process” by Carol Hughes and Bruce Fredenburg look deeper at the pain and stress of divorce.  Their article states,

“Specific to divorcing couples is the work of University of Virginia psychologist Robert Emery, who differentiates grieving an irrevocable loss like death from grieving a revocable loss like divorce, in which the possibility of reconciliation remains for the former spouses and their children. Based on his case observations and research, he developed a theory of grief in divorce that describes a cycle of grief for the divorcing couple. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a grief counselor.

Grief Counseling Certification Video on a Loss of a Spouse

Losing a spouse can be very painful.  The sense of the loss can vary depending on duration of relationship, state of the relationship and the bond itself.  For many, losing a spouse can create a deep void of pain and create multiple secondary losses as well

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Grief Counseling

 

Please review the video below

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Miscarriage Grief

Miscarriages are unseen tragedy to many eyes.  For many, it is swept under the rug never to be spoken again or told to others.  For others, it may be dismissed or devalued in regards to the hierarchy of losses.   Still others may suffer alone, or others may be neglected.  The harsh reality though is that it is a real and scaring loss that must be acknowledged and understood.

Unfortunately, many never find the help they need to deal with this type of loss.  Others are dismissed.  Disenfranchisement occurs because the child was not born and never seen.   Others may lessen the value of the unborn child to an infant.  Downplaying is very detrimental to healing in this regard.  Furthermore, others may shift the grief away and utilize various cliches.  For instance, one may say to the grieving, “well you can try again”, or “better luck next time”.  This type of statement devalues the loss of the child that died and the present pain of the parents.

Sometimes, as well, only the mother will receive the support.  Fathers, siblings, and grandparents may be neglected in their grief of the loss.  It is hence essential to acknowledge the loss and discuss with all connected to the pregnancy.  Secrecy, quiet and downplaying are not the answers.

Losing a child can have numerous consequences.  Following a miscarriage, the woman will undergo physical and hormonal changes, as well as psychological effects.  Loss of concentration, appetite and trouble sleeping can occur.   A feeling of depression and loss can follow with various emotions of sadness, anger and even guilt.  Some women feel an unearned guilt that they did not do enough to prevent the miscarriage.  Others may feel angry at the unfair nature of not being able to carry a pregnancy and have a child.

A miscarriage is a difficult loss in life. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification

 

Some families may suffer at different levels.  A family trying to conceive and with no children may grieve differently than a family with many children.  Other miscarriages may be far more painful due to the progression and time of the miscarriage.  Some miscarriages can occur without the woman knowing she was even pregnant, while other miscarriages can occur well farther into the pregnancy and also require medical attention.  Other times, the loss and pain may be correlated with spiritual beliefs regarding life itself.

Again, for a young teen girl, a miscarriage despite the trauma may be a relief.  Although all life is beautiful, the thought of a young motherhood and the responsibilities with it incurred great fear and the miscarriage indirectly freed the young person from such things.

So, as one can see, how the loss is perceived, the surrounding details and the beliefs of the person can all play huge roles in grief factor of a miscarriage as well.  In general though, those parents who are expecting, do not fall into this periphery categories and will suffer to some extent, some type of feeling of loss.   For many, the potential of what could have been can haunt the parents.  Mothers Day or Fathers Day can be vivid reminders of what could have occurred for those hoping to become parents.

It is important not to internalize and keep the loss a secret.  Couples should discuss, and single women should find individuals they can confidently speak to.  Some may require support groups or grief counseling to help process the loss itself.

For some parents, although no funeral is possible, a memory service can sometimes be performed, as well as possibly naming the child.  Those from more religious backgrounds, may feel security knowing their child is in Heaven and looking down upon them.  Others may merely process the loss, learn to understand the meaning of it and move forward looking to become pregnant again.

It is also important for the woman to care for herself after a miscarriage.  Beyond the mental and psychological loss, a woman may need time to rest and allow her body to re-adjust to post pregnancy status.

Ultimately, it is important to realize that miscarriages are a common loss for individuals and couples for the most part receive improper care and counseling.  Miscarriages are sometimes hidden and become a unresolved and disenfranchised grief.  It is important to help others through the pain and loss of miscarriage.  It is important to recognize the loss and give value to the loss.  It is important to find meaning in the miscarriage and to understand one’s life plan and how the miscarriage falls into that plan.

If you would like to learn more about grief itself and the nature of loss, then please review The American Academy of Grief Counseling’s, Grief Counseling Certification Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Grief Counseling.

Source:

Grief After a Miscarriage by Joanne Barker   WebMD

 

 

Grief Counseling Certification Video on Grief Myths

There are many misconceptions about grief.   Grief myths distort how people grieve and what to expect when individuals grieve

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional needs.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

 

Please also review the video below