What is Dissociation?

Exploring the Mind: Understanding the Phenomenon of Dissociation

Dissociation is a complex psychological phenomenon that involves a disconnection from reality, often as a coping mechanism for overwhelming stress or trauma. This article explores the various aspects of dissociation, including its impact on the mind-body connection, spiritual awakening, and healing. By delving into the spiritual aspect of dissociation and its linkages to personal growth, we aim to gain a deeper understanding of this intriguing phenomenon.
Key Takeaways
Dissociation is a mental response to triggers of past trauma. It reacts as a self defense mechanism but can be dangerous and cause injury if in public.

 

  • Dissociation is a coping mechanism for overwhelming stress or trauma, leading to disconnection from reality.
  • Dissociation can act as a catalyst for spiritual awakening, prompting individuals to question their reality and seek answers beyond the physical world.
  • Dissociation can create an opportunity for individuals to release past traumas and access a deeper sense of self.
  • There is a complex and intricate link between dissociation and spiritual insights, leading to personal growth and transformation.

Understanding Dissociation

What Is Dissociation?

Dissociation is a psychological coping mechanism that activates when an individual is faced with overwhelming stress or trauma. It represents a disconnection from reality, often resulting in disruptions to memory, emotions, and identity.

Common symptoms of dissociation include:

  • Feeling as though one is in a trance or daydream
  • Memory loss or difficulty with recall
  • A sense of detachment from oneself or the environment
  • Emotional numbness or being overwhelmed
  • Loss of control over emotions
  • Sensory disconnection, such as impaired touch or vision

Dissociation serves as a protective barrier, allowing individuals to distance themselves from distressing experiences. While it can be a temporary refuge, persistent dissociative states may require professional intervention to address underlying issues and restore a sense of reality.

Grounding Oneself

One who experiences dissociation may sometimes try to calm oneself due to the manifested trigger.  There are multiple ways one can seek grounding techniques to keep oneself from dissociating from reality.  Part of grounding can include touching something in the present moment, such as the soft side of a chair, or rubbing one’s feet against the carpet.   This type of physical grounding is only one strategy, others also include mental grounding where one utilizes mentally stimulating thoughts such as counting, recalling memories, or other visual affects.  Emotional grounding can also be employed with breathing exercises.

It is important to try to ground oneself when dissociation occurs. While it can help one deal with triggers, it can be very dangerous if in an active area. One could fall or hurt, or cause an accident.

 

It is sometimes extremely important to be able to ground oneself because sometimes if one dissociates, one can harm oneself or others due to lack of attention to driving, or moving around in public.  This can lead to accidents, falling, or injuring oneself.

If experiencing these types of issues, contact a mental health professional.

Manifestation of Dissociation

Dissociation is a complex phenomenon that presents itself in various forms, often as a psychological defense mechanism in response to trauma. Symptoms can range from mild detachment to severe disconnection from reality, impacting an individual’s daily functioning and sense of self.

  • Feeling as though one is in a trance or daydream
  • Experiencing memory loss or difficulty with recall
  • Sensing a detachment from oneself or surroundings
  • Encountering overwhelming emotions or emotional numbness
  • Challenges in controlling emotions
  • Disconnection from sensory experiences, such as touch or sight

Dissociation serves as a coping strategy, allowing individuals to distance themselves from extreme stress or traumatic events. This disconnection can be both protective and disruptive, altering one’s perception of reality and interaction with the world.

While the manifestations of dissociation are diverse, they often signal an underlying need for healing and support. Recognizing these signs is the first step towards understanding and addressing the root causes of dissociative experiences.

In addition, the manifestation of this state can lead to isolation, addictions and other ways to help cope with it.  It is important to recognize it and seek counseling and help to prevent it from possibly harming oneself.

Types of Dissociative States

Dissociative states are complex phenomena that can be categorized into three primary types: depersonalization, derealization, and dissociative amnesia. Depersonalization involves a sense of detachment from oneself, often described as feeling like an outside observer of one’s own body or thoughts. Derealization is characterized by a feeling of unreality or detachment from the environment, making the world seem foggy or dreamlike. Lastly, dissociative amnesia pertains to gaps in memory for personal information, sometimes specific to traumatic events.

  • Depersonalization: Detachment from self
  • Derealization: Detachment from environment
  • Dissociative Amnesia: Memory gaps

Each type of dissociative state represents a unique way in which the mind copes with stress or trauma. While they can be unsettling, understanding these states is crucial for effective treatment and personal growth.

It’s important to recognize that these states can occur independently or concurrently, and their manifestation can vary greatly among individuals. The experience of dissociation can be transient or part of a more chronic condition, such as dissociative identity disorder. Identifying the type of dissociative state is a critical step in addressing the underlying issues and moving towards healing.

Dissociative states can include according to the DSM-5 various levels of severity.  It can include an amnesia state that is simple to complex, a de-attachment state from self or environment or multiple personalities in its most severe form.

Dissociation and the Mind-Body Connection

Impact on Consciousness

Dissociation profoundly affects the landscape of consciousness, often leading to a disruption in the normal integration of thoughts, feelings, and experiences. The alteration in consciousness can range from mild detachment to a more severe disconnection from reality.

  • The default mode network, often associated with self-referential thoughts, is impacted during dissociative states.
  • Studies using fMRI have shown changes in the prefrontal parietal network, which is crucial for attention and working memory.
  • Consciousness supporting networks, including the anterior and posterior cortex, exhibit distinct patterns during dissociative episodes.

Dissociation challenges our understanding of consciousness, revealing the intricate workings of the mind and the delicate balance that sustains our sense of self and reality.

The neural correlates of consciousness, such as the default mode network and the prefrontal parietal network, are key areas of study to unravel the mysteries of dissociation. By examining the changes in these networks, researchers can gain insights into the mechanisms that underlie altered states of consciousness.

Spiritual Awakening

Spiritual awakening is often described as a profound shift in consciousness, where one experiences a deep connection with the essence of being and a recognition of a more expansive reality. It is a transformative journey that can lead to a profound understanding of oneself and the universe.

  • A shift in one’s perspective on life
  • Detachment from material possessions and ego
  • Increased compassion and empathy towards others
  • A feeling of oneness with the universe
  • A deepened sense of intuition and spiritual connection

While the path to spiritual awakening can be enlightening, it may also bring about challenges such as feelings of alienation or difficulty integrating experiences into everyday life. Nonetheless, the journey is often seen as a pivotal moment in personal growth and self-discovery.

The process of awakening can be spontaneous or induced by practices like meditation. It is marked by a series of internal changes:

  1. A reevaluation of personal values and beliefs
  2. An enhanced awareness of life’s interconnectedness
  3. A pursuit of deeper meaning and purpose beyond the self

The concept of dissociation, often perceived as a detachment from reality, can paradoxically serve as a bridge to personal growth. Dissociation provides a unique space for reflection and self-exploration, allowing individuals to step back from the immediacy of their experiences and view their lives from a new perspective. This detachment can lead to a deeper understanding of one’s self and the challenges faced, fostering a sense of competence and efficacy.

In the realm of personal development, dissociation can be a catalyst for change, offering an opportunity to reassess one’s goals and values without the interference of external pressures.

The process of personal growth through dissociation can be outlined in the following steps:

  • Recognizing the occurrence of dissociative states.
  • Understanding the triggers and underlying emotions.
  • Utilizing the reflective space provided by dissociation to gain insights.
  • Integrating these insights into daily life to foster resilience and adaptability.

This transformative journey can lead to an increase in intrinsic motivation, self-directed learning, and ultimately, a more profound sense of self-realization.

Healing and Transformation

Releasing Past Traumas

Dissociation can awaken us to deeper issues that are not healed. Please also review AIHCP’s Mental Health Certifications for qualified professionals

 

Dissociation offers a unique pathway for individuals to confront and release past traumas, paving the way to rediscover a more authentic self. This process often involves delving into the unconscious mind, where unresolved emotions and memories reside. By accessing these hidden parts of the psyche, one can begin the journey of healing and transformation.

Dissociation can serve as a bridge to personal growth, allowing for a re-examination of beliefs and identity. It is in this introspective space that many find the strength to let go of the pain that has held them back.

To facilitate this healing, certain practices can be adopted:

  • Breathwork: Engage in breathing exercises to help regulate emotions and achieve a sense of calm.
  • Creative expression: Utilize art, music, or writing as outlets for emotional release and self-discovery.
  • Mindfulness: Practice being present in the moment to reconnect with oneself and the environment.

While the journey through dissociation can be disorienting, it ultimately can lead to a profound spiritual awakening and a renewed search for meaning and purpose in life.

Accessing Deeper Self

In the journey of healing and transformation, dissociation can serve as a gateway to accessing deeper levels of the self. This process often involves delving into the unconscious mind, where dormant emotions and memories reside. By confronting and releasing these suppressed elements, individuals may experience a profound shift in their sense of identity and consciousness.

  • Exploration of beliefs and identity questioning
  • Release of past traumas
  • Unlocking of unconscious pathways
  • Potential for spiritual awakening

The act of accessing one’s deeper self is not just about self-discovery; it’s about reconstructing the very fabric of one’s being from the inside out.

As individuals navigate through this transformative phase, they may find themselves on the precipice of a spiritual awakening. The sense of emptiness that once pervaded their existence begins to fill with a newfound purpose and connection to something greater. This spiritual dimension adds a rich layer to the healing process, offering a sense of wholeness that transcends the individual experience.

Treatment

While coping involves grounding exercises, the best way to overcome and limit the dissociation is facing the trauma and understanding the triggers.  Treatments include medications such as anti-psychotics, anxiety reducing medications, anti depressants and sleep aids.  Counseling can also help. Individuals can go through cognitive behavioral therapy to better understand and react to the issue when it occurs.  One can also better learn to manage emotional reactions to triggers.  EDMR can also help de-sensitive individuals to the triggers by discussing and visualizing them in a safe place with a trained mental health professional.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the phenomenon of dissociation is a complex and multifaceted coping mechanism that the brain initiates in response to overwhelming stress or trauma. It manifests in various forms, affecting memory, emotions, and identity. The three types of dissociative states, depersonalization, derealization, and dissociative amnesia, present unique challenges for individuals experiencing dissociation. Additionally, dissociation may trigger spiritual awakening, leading individuals to question their reality and seek answers beyond the physical world. This exploration of dissociation and its potential connection to spiritual awakening provides valuable insights into the intricate workings of the human mind and the profound impact of coping mechanisms on personal growth and transformation. It is also important to understand ways to cope with it but also treat it to prevent serious injury or further pathological onset.  While it can help us identify past trauma, it must also be identified and worked on to prevent further issues.

Please also review AIHCP’s Mental Health Certifications for qualified professionals.

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling, Crisis Intervention and other mental health certification programs.  Licensed professional counselors or human service professionals can enhance their professional expertise with AIHCP’s certifications.  The programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is dissociation and how does it manifest?

Dissociation refers to a coping mechanism that the brain initiates when dealing with overwhelming stress or anxiety, leading to disconnection from reality. It can manifest in various forms, such as problems with memory, emotions, and identity.

What are the types of dissociative states?

There are three types of dissociative states, including depersonalization, derealization, and dissociative amnesia. Depersonalization: A person feels disconnected from themselves, as if they are watching themselves from a distance.

How does dissociation impact consciousness?

Dissociation causes a split between an individual’s mind and body. In a dissociative episode, an individual might feel like they are watching themselves from a distance, leading to a sense of detachment from their surroundings.

Is dissociation linked to spiritual awakening?

Yes, dissociation can act as a catalyst for spiritual awakening, prompting individuals to question their reality and seek answers that extend beyond the physical world.

How can dissociation lead to personal growth?

Dissociation can create an opportunity for individuals to explore their beliefs and question their identity. This self-reflection can lead to a spiritual awakening as the individual begins to search for meaning and purpose.

What is the relationship between dissociation and reality?

Dissociation is often a response to traumatic experiences, leading individuals to disconnect from reality as a coping mechanism. It can be characterized by feelings of being detached or disoriented and can lead to conditions like dissociative identity disorder.

How can spiritual insights help heal trauma-induced dissociation?

Spiritual insights can broaden one’s consciousness and deepen one’s understanding of life’s interconnectedness, potentially aiding in the healing of trauma-induced dissociation.

What are ways to practice spiritual growth while dissociating?

Embracing spiritual awakening, seeking meaning and purpose, and accessing deeper levels of consciousness are ways to practice spiritual growth while dissociating.

Additional Resources

“How to Stop Dissociating | 17 Grounding & Coping Strategies”. Access here

“What Happens When You Dissociate?”. Pugle, M. (2023).  Very Well Health.  Access here

“Dissociation”. Psychology Today.  Access here

“What Is Dissociation?”. Wiginton, K.  (2023). WebMD.  Access here

“Dissociative Disorders”. Mayo Clinic.  Access here

Neurotransmitters and Mental Health

The Impact of Neurotransmitters on Mental Health

Neurotransmitters play a crucial role in mental health, impacting mood, cognitive function, and overall well-being. Imbalances in neurotransmitters can lead to mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Understanding the modulation of neurotransmitters in psychiatric treatment is essential for addressing mental health challenges. This article explores the impact of neurotransmitters on mental health and the implications for treatment and well-being.

Neurotransmitters play a key role in our mental health in regards to depression and anxiety.

 

Key Takeaways

  • Neurotransmitters significantly impact mental health, influencing mood, motivation, and overall well-being.
  • Imbalances in dopamine and serotonin levels can lead to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety.
  • Positive mental health practices, such as mindfulness and stress management, have neuroprotective effects through neurotransmitter release.
  • Resilience and mental health are closely linked to the brain’s ability to adapt and recover from challenges, influenced by neuroplasticity and neurotransmitter activity.
  • Antidepressants impact neurotransmitters like serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, encouraging neuroplasticity and mood improvement.

Neurotransmitters and Their Role in Mental Health

Understanding Neurotransmitters

Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers in the brain responsible for transmitting signals between nerve cells. These chemical messengers play a crucial role in influencing various functions, including moodmotivation, and emotional responses. Two important neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, are known to increase the chances of happiness and a sense of well-being. They enable communication between brain cells, affecting the overall mental state. In the context of mental health, understanding the role of neurotransmitters is essential for developing effective treatment strategies and improving overall well-being.

The Impact of Neurotransmitters on Mood Regulation

Neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), and noradrenalin (NE) play a crucial role in mood regulation, motivation, and emotional stability. Imbalances in the production of these neurotransmitters can lead to mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. When serotonin and dopamine levels are well-balanced, individuals are more likely to experience emotional stability, happiness, and satisfaction in their daily lives. However, low levels of dopamine can result in a lack of motivation, pleasure, and feelings of reward, while low serotonin levels can impact mood and emotional well-being. Understanding the dominance and deficit of neurotransmitters in the body is essential for maintaining overall health and well-being.

Neurotransmitters and Cognitive Function

Neurotransmitters play a crucial role in cognitive function, impacting memory, learning, and decision-making processes. The table below provides a summary of the cognitive functions influenced by key neurotransmitters:

Neurotransmitter Cognitive Function
Acetylcholine Memory and learning
Serotonin Mood regulation
Dopamine Reward processing

Understanding the intricate relationship between neurotransmitters and cognitive function is essential for comprehending the complexities of mental health and neurological disorders. It is imperative to acknowledge the multifaceted nature of neurotransmitter activity and its profound impact on cognitive processes.

Neurotransmitter Imbalance and Mental Health Disorders

Recent research indicates that the disordered metabolism of neurotransmitters plays a significant role in the pathophysiological process of depression. Studies have specifically shown that three neurotransmitters – serotonin (5-HT)dopamine (DA), and noradrenalin (NE) – have a significant impact on the brain circuits involved in motivation, emotion regulation, cognitive performance, and psychological stress responses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Dysfunction of neurotransmitter metabolism is associated with the severity of depression in first-diagnosed, drug-naïve depressed patients. It is reasonable to deduce that 5-HT dysregulation exists in the onset of MDD, while DA and NE are also abnormal. Additionally, research has discovered that the imbalance of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism is often present in patients with MDD.

Neurotransmitter Imbalance in Anxiety Disorders

Neurotransmitter imbalance in anxiety disorders is a complex phenomenon that involves the dysregulation of key neurotransmitters such as serotonindopamine, and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters play a crucial role in modulating mood, emotional responses, and the body’s stress response system. The imbalance of these neurotransmitters can lead to heightened anxiety, panic attacks, and other symptoms associated with anxiety disorders.

To illustrate the impact of neurotransmitter imbalance in anxiety disorders, the following table presents the quantitative data on neurotransmitter levels in individuals with anxiety disorders compared to healthy individuals:

Neurotransmitter Anxiety Disorder Healthy Individuals
Serotonin Decreased Normal
Dopamine Fluctuating Stable
Norepinephrine Elevated Normal

It is important to note that neurotransmitter imbalance in anxiety disorders is a multifaceted issue that requires comprehensive assessment and personalized treatment approaches. Individuals with anxiety disorders may benefit from a combination of pharmacological interventions, psychotherapy, and lifestyle modifications to address the underlying neurotransmitter dysregulation.

Neurotransmitter modulation in anxiety disorders is a dynamic area of research, and ongoing studies are exploring novel therapeutic strategies to restore neurotransmitter balance and alleviate symptoms.

Neurotransmitter Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

Dysfunction of neurotransmitter metabolism is a critical factor in the severity of schizophrenia. The imbalance in the glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle has been linked to elevated plasma γ-aminobutyrate/glutamate ratio, which may influence responses to antipsychotic treatment. This suggests a potential association between neurotransmitter dysfunction and the management of schizophrenia. Further research is needed to explore the implications of neurotransmitter imbalance in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and its potential for targeted treatment strategies.

Neurotransmitter Modulation in Psychiatric Treatment

Pharmacological Modulation of Neurotransmitter Activity

Balance of certain amounts of levels of neurotransmitters are key to emotional and mental wellbeing

 

The pharmacological modulation of neurotransmitter activity plays a crucial role in psychiatric treatment. It involves the targeted manipulation of neurotransmitter levels to achieve therapeutic effects while minimizing side effects. This modulation is often achieved through the use of pharmacological agents that interact with specific neurotransmitter receptors and pathways.

In addition, recent studies have focused on the quantification of tryptophan metabolites and neurotransmitters in the serum and brain of mice using LC-MS/MS-based techniques. These studies have provided valuable insights into the quantitative aspects of neurotransmitter activity and its potential implications for psychiatric treatment.

Furthermore, while direct measurement of neurotransmitter levels in the living brain is technically impractical and unethical, there is growing evidence supporting the synchronization of peripheral neurotransmitter levels with brain tissues or CSF levels. This synchronization has opened new avenues for exploring the mechanisms of mental health disorders, particularly in relation to neurotransmitter imbalances.

Neurotransmitter-Based Therapies for Mental Health Disorders

Neurotransmitter-based therapies for mental health disorders focus on restoring the balance of neurotransmitters in the brain to alleviate symptoms of various mental health conditions. These therapies often involve the use of pharmacological agents to target specific neurotransmitter systems and regulate their activity. Additionally, lifestyle modifications such as exercise, diet, and stress management are recommended to support the effectiveness of neurotransmitter-based therapies.

  • Pharmacological agents target specific neurotransmitter systems
  • Lifestyle modifications support the effectiveness of therapies

It is important to emphasize the holistic approach to mental health treatment, integrating both pharmacological and lifestyle interventions to address neurotransmitter imbalances effectively.

Challenges in Targeting Neurotransmitters for Treatment

The challenges in targeting neurotransmitters for treatment are multifaceted and complex. Precise modulation of neurotransmitter activity in the brain is a significant hurdle, as direct measurement of neurotransmitter levels in the living brain is technically impractical and unethical. However, there is increasing evidence supporting the synchronization of peripheral neurotransmitter levels with the brain tissues or CSF level. This presents an opportunity for indirect assessment and modulation of neurotransmitter activity.

To address these challenges, researchers have explored the role of neurotransmitters and their metabolites in mental health disorders, particularly Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of using neurotransmitters as a tool for anticipating MDD, highlighting the potential clinical applications of this research.

In a cross-sectional study, 87 first-diagnosed, drug-naïve patients with depression and 50 healthy controls were included. The study focused on the levels and turnovers of various neurotransmitters, including glutamine, glutamic acid, GABA, kainate, VMA, MHPG, NE, HVA, and dihydroxy-phenyl acetic acid. This quantitative approach aimed to establish a link between neurotransmitters and MDD, paving the way for objective laboratory prediction of neurotransmitter involvement in MDD.

Neurotransmitter modulation plays a crucial role in psychiatric treatment, influencing mood, behavior, and mental health. Understanding the impact of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine is essential in developing effective treatment strategies for various psychiatric disorders. At the American Academy of Grief Counseling, we recognize the significance of neurotransmitter modulation in addressing grief-related mental health challenges. Our grief counseling certification programs provide comprehensive education on the intersection of neurotransmitter function and psychiatric treatment, empowering counselors to offer holistic support to individuals coping with grief and loss. Connect with us to explore our certified grief counselor courses and continuing education opportunities.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the impact of neurotransmitters on mental health is profound and multifaceted. Understanding the role of neurotransmitters is crucial for improving both mental and physical health, as they impact sleep, anxiety, concentration, and overall well-being. Imbalances in neurotransmitters like dopaminenorepinephrine, and adrenaline can affect mental abilities, mood, and the ability to react sensibly to aggression. Additionally, neurotransmitters like acetylcholine and serotonin not only affect the brain but also have a direct impact on the body, including memory, cognition, body movement, and bowel movement. Restoring and maintaining a healthy gut can have a significant impact on overall health, including reducing symptoms of depression and improving the functioning of the nervous system. Understanding the dominance and deficit of neurotransmitters in our bodies can have a significant impact on our overall health and well-being.

Please also review AIHCP’s mental health certifications and see if they meet your academic and professional goals

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Mental Health Certifications.  The programs range from Grief Counseling to Stress Management  to Crisis Intervention to Anger Management.  There are multiple other topics that many licensed counselors, social workers, pastoral care givers would find useful in their work.  The programs are online and independent study.  Please review

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What are neurotransmitters and how do they impact mental health?

Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers in the brain that play a crucial role in regulating mood, motivation, and overall well-being. Imbalances in neurotransmitters can lead to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety.

Which neurotransmitters are associated with mental health disorders?

Dopamine and serotonin are two essential neurotransmitters associated with mental health disorders. Imbalances in their production can lead to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety.

How do neurotransmitters impact cognitive function?

Neurotransmitters like acetylcholine and serotonin not only affect the brain but also have a direct impact on cognitive function, memory, body movement, and bowel movement.

Neurotransmitter imbalances, particularly low levels of dopamine and serotonin, are associated with depression. Low levels of these neurotransmitters can lead to a lack of motivation, pleasure, and feelings of reward.

How do antidepressants impact neurotransmitters?

Antidepressants adjust how the brain uses certain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and sometimes dopamine, to improve mood and behavior. They can also encourage a process called neuroplasticity, which allows the brain to change its structure.

What role does neuroplasticity play in mental health?

Neuroplasticity, the brain’s capacity to reorganize itself, plays a pivotal role in resilience and the brain’s ability to adapt and recover from challenges. It allows the brain to change its structure by strengthening or weakening connections between neurons.

Can restoring and maintaining a healthy gut impact mental health?

Restoring and maintaining a healthy gut can have a significant impact on overall mental health, including reducing symptoms of depression and improving the functioning of the nervous system.

What challenges exist in targeting neurotransmitters for treatment?

Challenges in targeting neurotransmitters for treatment include the complexity of the brain’s chemical balance, individual variations in neurotransmitter levels, and the potential for side effects from pharmacological modulation.

Meta Description

Explore the impact of neurotransmitters on mental health, from their role in mood regulation and cognitive function to their link with mental health disorders and psychiatric treatment. Understand the neurobiology of resilience and the role of neurotransmitters in brain health.

Additional Resources

“Neurotransmitters”, Cleveland Clinic. (2022). Access here

“What Are Neurotransmitters?”. Cherry, K. (2023).  Very Well Mind.  Access here

“What are neurotransmitters?”. Berry, Jennifer. (2024). Medical News Today. Access here

“Neurotransmitters and Mental Health: Understanding the Impact”. Khaliq, R. (2023). Med Vidi. Access here