Grief Counseling Certification Article on the Necessity of Healthy Grieving

Grief that is not processed or acknowledged can cause long term mental issues.  Complications in grief are due to not facing grief and processing the loss in a healthy fashion.  When we purposely ignore our feelings due to loss, we open ourselves to greater damage down the road.   Grief is part of healing and is essential to adjusting to the loss in a healthy fashion.  If we do not grieve, we will suffer more.  Acknowledging grief is an essential ingredient to recovery.

One must accept the grief associated with their journey in life. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic goals

One cannot dismiss emotion due to shame or fear of weakness, but realize that anything worth love is also worth grieving over.

The article, “The Grief We Avoid Is The Grief That We Need” by LaLaine Dawn looks at how grief is important and essential to the very reality of living.  She states,

“A lot of us are so afraid to admit we are grieving for fear that people may see us as weak or stupid for feeling that way. Honestly, I can’t blame you. In my experience, there were people in my life who would laugh at my grief. They would tell me I deserved to suffer.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Grief is hence an important element of the human condition.  It cannot be ignored but must be acknowledged and dealt with.  To learn more, please review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Pastoral Thanatology Certification Article on Different Cultures and Dying

As a counselor who deals with death and dying, it is important to have a strong grasp of different cultures and their views of death.  Pastoral Counselors and chaplains come across many different views on death not only within main stream creeds but also other religions not as common in the United States.

While grief is universal, it is nonetheless culturally experienced in different ways. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Living with dying: Different cultures treat death in different ways” by  Rev. Matthew von Behrens discusses how chaplains need to be aware of the differences of the people they come into contact with.  He briefly describes a few different cultures on their views of death.  The article states,

“Experiencing differences in how various cultures view the end of life can help us understand our own traditions better, as well as develop a greater appreciation and respect for others. Here are three traditions I have encountered in my work as a chaplain at the UVMHN’s Porter Hospital and Helen Porter Rehabilitation and Nursing and practices within them”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Pastoral Thanatology Certification and see if it meets your professional and academic needs

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Complicated Grief and Help

Grief is a natural reaction but over time it can become complicated.  Grief that does not adjust to loss but becomes toxic requires assistance.  Counseling can help but sometimes treatment is also needed.  Licensed professional counselors can help with this but usually a simple certified grief counselor can help someone learn to cope with the grief in a healthy way.

When has your grief become complicated and no longer just a normal reaction to loss? Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Here’s When It’s Time to See Someone About Your Grief” by Patia Braithwaite states,

“As awful as it feels, grief is a natural human response to losing someone close to you. The intense emotions that come with grief can all be an appropriate part of eventually helping you heal as much as possible. But there are times when grief is even more overwhelming than usual—times when it hinders your life and happiness long-term”

To read the entire article, please click here

Complicated grief can become a big issue if not treated.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Grief and Coping

Grief is something that should not be denied or avoided during loss.  It is actually a natural reaction to the loss of something wonderful and beautiful.  If grief does not exist then what was loss had no true value.  Helping people grieve is important.

Grief is a sign we once loved. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Improving How We Perceive and Manage Grief” by Lisa McDonald states,

“None of us are immune nor are we spared from eventually losing someone we love. There is no step-by-step manual, or quick-fix approach, or one solution fits all strategy for how to navigate and maneuver the journey, as grief and loss is such a uniquely individualized, intricate, and delicate process.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program

 

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Negative Effects of Grief on Body

Grief is a reaction to loss.  It is natural but overtime grief can become toxic to the body.  Long term and pathological grief can weaken the body and affect it negatively.  This is why it is important to ensure you are grieving in a healthy fashion.  If not, one should seek help and counseling.

Long term and pathological grief can negative effects on health. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “How Grief Shows Up In Your Body” by Stephanie Hairston looks at the negative effects of adverse grief in one’s life.  She states,

“What causes these physical symptoms? A range of studies reveal the powerful effects grief can have on the body. Grief increases inflammation, which can worsen health problems you already have and cause new ones. It batters the immune system, leaving you depleted and vulnerable to infection. The heartbreak of grief can increase blood pressure and the risk of blood clots.”

To continue reading, please read the entire article by clicking here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your professional and academic goals.

Grief Counseling Certification Article and Approaching the Bereaved

It is important to be there for family and friends when they lose someone.  What to say and what to do can sometimes be confusing though.  We want to help but may not know how.

Knowing what to say to the bereaved can be difficult for the untrained. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “6 thoughtful things to do when someone passes away” from Considerable Staff looks at how we can approach this difficult situation and help others.  The article states,

“Offers of support can be open-ended and vague, and often the last thing a grieving person wants to do is devote effort to an ambiguous offer of food or company.  Knowing the best way to lend a hand can be difficult, but it shouldn’t stop you from trying.”

Hopefully we can all be better friends and family to those suffering a loss.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Stillborn Grief

The loss of a child and stillborn birth is a very traumatic type of loss for parents.  This type of loss robs the parents of anything before life is able to experienced outside the womb.  Cases vary if the child dies before or during birth, but the blunt reality of losing one’s child on its birthday is a cold reality that few ever recover from.

The loss of a child at birth or prior to birth is a tragic event. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
The loss of a child at birth or prior to birth is a tragic event. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Parents Mourning Stillbirth Follow Familiar Patterns on YouTube” by Christine Ro looks at some of the familiar patterns by parents from youtube.  The article states, 

“For 24 agonizing hours, Monica Franco-Pineda prepared to deliver a stillborn baby. She and her husband, Walter, had learned on Oct. 14, 2010, four days past her due date, that their son, Gabriel, no longer had a heartbeat. “I had a lot of time to digest what was going to happen,” she remembers.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification to learn more about helping others grief and loss.

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Loss within a Company

When death happens in a business setting it can upset the entire organization.  The surviving colleague needs to take up the slack and help the organization forward.  How to deal with this type of loss though can have many effects on the team.  Many secondary losses can also be experienced as a whole to the company.

Losing a colleague at work can be difficult.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
Losing a colleague at work can be difficult. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “When a Colleague Dies, CEOs Change How They Lead” by Guoli Chen states,

“If the person doing the thinking is among the upper echelons of an organization, the recognition that their time on earth is all too finite can have a widespread impact across their company.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Mass Shooting Post Grief

There is nothing more unexpected and more traumatic than a school shooting.  The lasting grief and forever scars on the survivors are unfathomable.   Family, fellow students, and the community all suffer traumatically from such senseless loss.

Mass shootings are the things of nightmares and a traumatic form of loss and grief.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
Mass shootings are the things of nightmares and a traumatic form of loss and grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Lasting Grief After a Mass Shooting” by Ashley Fetters looks closer at this horrific pain and loss.  The article states,

“Mass shootings often result in a particularly difficult kind of grief known as traumatic grief. Littleton describes traumatic grief as a PTSD reaction that occurs when someone is grieving over another person’s violent or unexpected death; in other words, traumatic grief occurs when someone has PTSD symptoms on top of grief symptoms.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Unfortunately this type of grief is all too common for America as a collective whole.  We all suffer from this loss in some way, with some more intimately connected than others.

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic needs.

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Speaking About Child Loss

After losing a child, many come to your side and listen.  Many feel horrible about your loss and look to comfort you as well. However, soon as time goes by, even years, the need to discuss the loss becomes less and less.  For those who never experience this, it appears over, but for those who have children or who have loss a child, realizes that such losses never go away.  One may learn to adjust but the pain never ceases.  In this way, it is another pain suffered by parents when the life of a child loss is years later no longer a topic.

It can be very difficult to discuss child loss BUT parents want to talk about it.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
It can be very difficult to discuss child loss BUT parents want to talk about it. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

Others are fearful to discuss the loss of a child at any time.  They fear the topic is too taboo or do not know how to bring up such a tragedy.  In many cases, this makes it worse for the bereaved parents as well, who need the outlet to discuss the loss itself.

The article, ‘When people don’t want to talk about your child, it feels very lonely’ by Chloe Booker addresses this sadness.  She states,

“The number one thing you can do to help someone in this scenario is to just talk about their child. It’s no different to a child on earth, to a child no longer here with us, you still want to talk about them.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.