Grief Counseling Program Article on Dealing with Grief While at Work

Grief is difficult to deal with.  It forces us to adapt and change.  Through this change, it can be distracting and painful.  Unfortunately, many of us cannot walk away from life but must learn to cope with grief while attending school or working.  This is a difficult process but sometimes can also be therapeutic.  It frees the mind and gives us some normalcy.  Some may even attempt to escape into work to avoid the pain.  This is as much a problem as those who cannot focus on work due to grief.

Learning to adjust at work is important.  Life must go on.  It is important to let your manager or supervisor know of your situation. It may be important also to find counseling to help one adjust.  It can definitely be tough to work while grieving but it is something one must do.

 

Working while grieving can be very difficult for some. Some consider a burden others an escape. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

The article, “7 ways to deal with grief at work” by Erica Sweeney looks the difficulty of coping while at work but looks at ways to help individuals move forward with their career task.  She states,

“Many employees aren’t able to take much time off from work to process a loss. While 88% of employers offer bereavement leave, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, it averages about three days. That amount can vary greatly, however, since no federal requirements for bereavement leave exist. TheFamily and Medical Leave Act doesn’t specifically cover it, and the Fair Labor Standards Act doesn’trequire paid time off to attend funerals.”

To read the entire article, please click here

With careers and work so important to financial stability, it is critical to overcome grief to the extent one can cope while at work.  While we cannot escape grief, we have to be able to live with it.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Divorce and Loss

Grief and loss do not always involve death.  Losing anything is the recipe for grief.  One of the most common forms of loss is divorce.  Romantic breakups are tough but marriages that fail are even tougher.  Marriage does not only involve the heart, but it also involves a sacred vow.  The loss removes one from consistency of schedule and thrusts one into a new environment.  Furthermore, the loss has many secondary losses associated with it.  Financial burden, loss of possessions, less time with children or pets, as well as legal stress all play a large role in divorce.

Divorce loss is far more than just a broken heart but affects one’s entire existence. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

This is why divorce is such a stressful and painful process.  It is an uprooting of one’s life.  It may be for the best, but the process of healing takes many years to finally become whole again.

The article,” 12 Strategies For Dealing With Grief After A Divorce” by Karen Finn looks deeper at the types of losses.  She states,

“Dealing with grief after a divorce is no different. Nearly 50% of marriages (and 41% of first marriages) in the United States will end in divorce or separation. Divorce grief is, therefore, a high-odds reality.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Ecological Grief

The loss of nature and ecological destruction plays a large role on humanity.  Individuals suffer from the devastation and grieve the loss of what was once.  These types of losses of beauty as well as climate problems cause distress.  This type of grief and anxiety is ecological grief.

Ecological grief is a true loss that we suffer as a society. Please also review our Grief Counseling training program

 

For instance, some may fear the loss of beauty found in the rain forest or the coral reef.  The beauty but also the instrumental role they play in our climates are a twofold loss of what we all experience with their destruction.

The article, “How to cope with the grief that comes with the world’s ecological crisis” by John Sharry looks into this type of loss.  He states,

 

“Many of those working within the environmental charities describe their heartbreak and grief at the loss of the natural world. This is the natural world which is not only beautiful in its own right but it is the world on which we entirely depend on as humans. For communities on the frontline of the climate emergency this grief is much more acute and threatening.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Program Article on Meaning in Grief

Grief is a universal emotion that strikes humanity’s most existential questions.   With pain, suffering and loss, many try to find meaning in grief.  Finding meaning and coping with grief is a life skill that all must learn to deal with if they expect to work through the pains of life.   Sometimes it is difficult to find meaning and others need help tying the narrative of life together from loss to loss.  Each loss creating a chapter in the overall book of life.  Loss is always a result of something good and ironically if we never lost, then we would never have.  Love is the purpose of life and unfortunately tied to love is loss.  While in this temporal valley of tears, humanity’s existential journey is about balancing love and loss and understanding how to create a life narrative that somehow makes sense.

Finding meaning in grief can be difficult. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “Finding Meaning in Grief” by Julie Phitzinger discusses trying to find meaning in loss.  She states,

“For Kessler, a noted grief expert,  finding a path forward became an unexpected and integral part of his life.  While Kessler was writing this book,  his son David, who had overcome a drug habit only to start using again, died in 2016 at the age of 21.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Grief and Holidays

Grief is difficult but it becomes more difficult with the holidays.  Holidays can remind us of times spent and re-open wounds of loss.  This is why Christmas or Thanksgiving can be so difficult to navigate for those dealing with a loss, especially a recent loss.

Grief can be more difficult during the holidays because it reminds us of the past
Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic needs

The article, “Navigating the Holidays with Grief” by Laura Wade looks at the particulars of dealing with grief during the holidays and how to better cope and deal with loss.  She states,

Holidays are typically considered happy times celebrating with family and friends. However, when someone has experienced a loss, the holidays can magnify the feelings associated with grief such as sadness, anger, guilt or regret.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Program Article on Living Grief and Terminal Illness

Grief is more about just physical loss but also the thought of loss itself.  When someone is diagnosed with an illness or disease that is terminal, one has yet to lose but acknowledges that loss will come.  This type of anticipatory grief is very common with family who live with terminal diagnosis of a loved one.  Parents can also live with this type of loss when a child is diagnosed with a disease, terminal or not.  They have to live with the new reality imposed by the disease or the potential future of loss.  This can create an uneasy existence of hope and loss existing side by side.

Sometimes while anticipating loss, we still must enjoy the present. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

The article, “The ‘Living Grief’ I Carry After My Child’s Diagnosis” by Kat Barlow looks at this type of living grief.  She states regarding a family and their child Noah and his terminal diagnosis,

“Noah has a living life list, not a bucket list. The difference being, we are not waiting for the end. We are instead celebrating and living life now. We seize every opportunity to make memories. We make time; we don’t sweat the small stuff. We cancel appointments to sit in the sunshine instead. We make up stories.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Living and dealing with grief with hope and love is a difficult thing to do but sometimes it is the best thing to do even if darker days lay ahead.  One cannot deny the future, but one can definitely love the present.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Grief and Sleep

Great article on grief and how it can affect sleep.  Sleep is important to recovery from anything and sometimes loss can take such an affect on someone that sleep can be negatively affected.  Whether nightmares or insomnia, it is important to find help in dealing with grief when sleep is deprived.

Sleep is key to good health. Grief can disrupt sleep and health. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

The article, “Sleeping After Loss: Understanding the Effects of Grief on Sleep” by Sleep Adviser offers a comprehensive information chart on grief and sleep.  The article looks at the danger of lack of sleep and ways to regain sleep while dealing with grief.  The article states,

“Losing sleep might be a normal thing that everyone goes through from time to time, especially in times of great distress or sadness, but that doesn’t diminish the terrible impact it can have on the body.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Divorce and Loss

Divorce naturally creates loss and grief.  Grief is a natural bi product of divorce and adjusting to this type of loss can take years.  While numerous stresses can occur, some divorces can create complicated grief reactions.  In these cases, extra help and counseling is needed.

Divorce always leads to some type of grief. Sometimes it can more serious than other times. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program

The article, “Grieving After Divorce Is Normal, But This Kind Of Grief Isn’t” by Karen Finn discusses when grief and divorce can go terribly wrong.  The article states,

“After all, divorce is the end of a way of life and of your dreams. It makes sense that you’d feel sad about it, mourn who you were in your married life and are no more, and be grief-stricken that all of your plans for a happily-ever-after have come to a screeching halt.”

To learn more about divorce and how to help individuals through it, review the entire article by clicking here

Divorce is never easy.  A trained Grief Counselor can help.  Please review our Grief Counseling Training Program to see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Grandparent’s and Grief of Stillborn

A stillborn birth is a terrible experience for the parents.  Still in the shuffle of loss and pain, other family members are also forgotten.  Potential grandparents suffer the loss very hard as well.  Grand parents share in the lives of their children and seeing their adult children lose a child and also be denied a grandchild is also very painful.

Grandparents also suffer the loss of a grandchild due to stillborn. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic needs

The article, “When a baby is stillborn, grandparents are hit with ‘two lots of grief’. Here’s how we can help” by Beth Daley states,

“Six babies are stillborn every day in Australia. This significant loss affects parents for years to come, often the rest of their lives. However, stillbirth also affects many others, including grandparents.”

Grandparents definitely have much to suffer when they lose a grandchild.   They have to not only mourn themselves but also be there for their children.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Program Article on the Fog of Grief

Great article on progressing through the fog of grief.  Grief is not an easy passage but many times if full  doubt and fear.  We can become loss and numb in our emotions.

The fog of grief can numb us and affect our whole existence. Please also review our Grief Counseling program

The article, “How to Get Through the Fog of Grief” by Kerri Fivecoat-Campbell states,

When my 57-year-old husband, Dale, suddenly died of a massive heart attack on Nov. 20, 2018, two days before Thanksgiving, to say I was in shock was an understatement. More than a month later, I realized just how much my mental capacity was affected by this life-changing trauma

To review the entire article please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and the four core courses required to become certified.