Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Certification Article on Discussing Miscarriage

Miscarriages are sometimes a forgotten grief.  Parents suffer greatly who lose a child due to miscarriage.  It is unseen, and sometimes unknown, so the ability to find support can be difficult.  Both husband and wife share in the pain but many times the born children are left in the dark regarding the lost.  Children need to be explanations if a miscarriage occurs.

Discussions with a child about a miscarriage are important. Please also review AIHCP’s Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Certification

 

These explanations need to be age appropriate.  They also need to ensure the child knows there is no blame for the loss but that sometimes these things can happen.

The article, “How To Talk To Kids About Miscarriage” by Jessica Zucker takes a closer look and on how to discuss the loss during miscarriage to children.  She states,

“Much like conversations centering around divorce or a parent separation, it’s common for children to immediately blame themselves for a pregnancy or infant loss. This is primarily due to their cognitive development, which leave them centering themselves and/or only seeing things through their perspectives. So it’s vital that throughout the conversation, and perhaps even at the start, you remind your child that they are in no way responsible for any pregnancy outcome, especially one that ends in a loss. And, that it’s not the fault of the mom either.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review The American Academy of Grief’s Grief Counseling Program as well as its Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Certification and see if they meet your professional and academic needs.  The programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Grief Counseling.

 

Grief Counseling Training Article on Miscarriage and Loss

Miscarriage loss is many times a loss suffered alone.  It is disenfranchised and belittled at times because the child was not born.  Pending on the time period of the miscarriage, determines the greater loss but many women regardless feel a special connection and their bodies react to the loss.

Miscarriage grief is a lonely road for many women. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Training

 

The article, “11 things you should know about grief after miscarriage or baby loss” from Asiaone looks at this type of loss in greater depth.  The article states,

“The aftermath of losing a baby during pregnancy is haunting. You have your precious baby inside you — and then the world comes to a halt, when you learn you’ve lost that part of you. There are very few words  to explain the depth of despair that a woman goes through as she grapples with this devastating loss.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Training to learn more how to help individuals with loss.  Trained certified grief counselors can help those deal with the loss of miscarriage and guide them through the pain

 

Grief Counseling Certification Program Article on Miscarriage Grief

Miscarriages are a forgotten grief for many parents.  The loss of the child is seen not as a child in some cases but only as what if.  The reality of the what if and the fear of not having a child incurs a reality of a loss but also a loss of potentials.  Many barren families suffer multiple miscarriages and suffer horrible grief over the loss and inability to have a child born.   Unfortunately, there is no grave, there is no funeral and there is no way to express the loss formally.

Miscarriages are sometimes the forgotten grief by society. Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification Program

 

The article, “WHAT FOUR MISCARRIAGES TAUGHT ME ABOUT GRIEF AND FAITH” by Rebecca Abbot looks at his type of disenfranchised loss.  She states,

“Miscarriage has been – and is often still – considered a taboo subject. “One of the reasons why miscarriage and fertility issues in general are taboo or still have stigma around them is because anything related to fertility just feels very intimate and deeply personal,” Adriel explains. “It’s involving the body, our hearts, our dreams. It’s involving our minds, our preconceived ideas of the role of women and men and family, and how we imagine our lives.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Certification program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Article on Explaining Miscarriage

Miscarriages can be very confusing for children expecting a baby brother or sister.   Parents need to be able to explain the loss in a logical way to the child.  How to go about explaining loss can be difficult but it needs to be done in a sensitive but informative way

Explaining a miscarriage to a child can be difficult. Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

The article,  “How to Talk to Your Kid About Miscarriage” by Meghan Moravcik Walbert states,

“Despite how common miscarriage is, those who go through it often find it to be a painfully isolating experience. It frequently happens before the expectant mom or couple have told friends or family—or even their other children.”

Miscarriages happen in families and it is important to discuss with other children in the family.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

Grief Counseling Certification Article on Miscarriages and Bereavement Time

Miscarriage is a real loss.  It is a loss of potential dreams as well as a loss of a child.  The connection with the child in the womb is real and it also has emotional reactions when that bond is broken.   Businesses should be more understanding after someone loses a child to miscarriage.   There needs to be a proper bereavement time to process this loss.

Employees may need more time for miscarriage loss.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
Employees may need more time for miscarriage loss. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “Miscarriage can be a bereavement, and we must reflect that in employment law” by Alex Penk, discusses why businesses need to be more understanding and work around the grief of an employee dealing with a miscarriage in the family.  The article states,

 

“A bill to provide bereavement leave for miscarriages will soon face its first vote in parliament. It’s a subject that’s close to my heart. I can vividly remember the day, nearly six years ago, when I drove to work on an otherwise ordinary morning, sat in the car park staring at the dashboard for around 10 minutes, then drove away again without getting out. Less than 24 hours earlier I had been at home, sobbing uncontrollably, after a radiographer had kindly but matter-of-factly told us that there was no heartbeat in my wife’s womb, and the crushing grief had begun to descend.”

To read the entire article, please click here

To learn more about grief and loss, please also review our Grief Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.