Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program on Children and Proper Grief Response

Children grieve and process loss differently than adults.  This a critically important concept for all grief counselors to grasp in their understanding of helping children deal with grief.  Children depending on their age as well as mental and emotional maturity all process grief differently.   Understanding this key concept can prevent numerous errors in child development when helping a child a through the process of grief.

It is important to teach children about the nature of loss. Please also review AIHCP’s Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

 

In the past, emotional and mental barriers to development of children were innocently but ignorantly created by concerned caregivers seeking to shield children from loss.  Children were denied final farewells at death scenes, or prevented from attending a funeral.   Hiding death, even that of a family pet as simple as a fish, were all considered important steps in protecting a child’s innocence from death.

In reality, sparing children the realities of death, or diminishing the event of death caused more damage to the mental and emotional development of children.  Children would then inherit improper coping mechanisms as adults when dealing with loss.  They would also have grief complications with past losses.  The inability to say good bye, find closure, or fully understand the nature of the loss crippled their abilities to deal with grief as adults.

In preventing these issues, adults, caregivers and grief counselors need to address loss to children. An explanation of the loss should correlate with the understanding and mental maturity of the child regarding the finality of death.  Death and loss should be seen as opportunities for the child to learn about death, especially in regards to smaller losses.

In dealing with these losses, caregivers should express death clearly without any figurative language and also encourage children to express their feelings and thoughts.  If a child wishes to express that is fine and if a child wishes to express less, that is fine.  The importance is that children are able to express their feelings and know that life will continue.

It is critical to allow children to express themselves as they fit not only for their own understanding but also to dismiss any ill thoughts regarding the loss that may fester within the child.  Children sometimes can blame themselves for the death of an individual or hold guilt that most adults would dismiss.  It is hence important to discuss the death clearly but also to have a full understanding of the child’s understanding of the loss in relationship to him or her.

By responding uniquely to each child’s need during a loss based on the child’s understanding, one can eliminate any possible grief complications and also allow the child to fully express him or herself.  This enables a better transition mentally, socially and emotionally.

To learn more how to speak to and understand grieving children, then please review AICHP’s Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program.  The program is open to currently certified Grief Counselors and is offered as an advanced specialty program.  Those who meet the qualifications can become certified in this advanced specialty field and learn to better help children cope with loss and grief.

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Article on Grief and the Loss of a Mother

The loss of a mother for a child alters the child’s life permanently.   Grief Counseling and a strong family life is important for the child to cope and adapt to life without his or her mother.

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

The article, “Children Mourning the Loss of a Mom” by Mike McEnaney looks at the loss of a mother and the difficulties children have mourning the loss of their mother.  How to deal with this type of loss is difficult but varies depending on the age.  The article states,

“Grief takes on many forms, sometimes it’s sad and sometimes it can be powerful and lifechanging as well. For Aidan the spirit of his Mom is alive within him and that mutual love has been a force in his life. That love is in a lot of places if you take the time to look.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

 

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Training Article on Child Grief

Child grieving is unique and different than adult grieving.  Child grief is multi dimensional based on the child’s age and maturity.  Children grieve differently and understand reality and death and loss differently.  Due to this, it is critical to discuss loss with children and expose them to the reality of it in a good way.

It is important to understand children and how they grieve. Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

The article, “How to Help a Child Cope With Grief” by Jen Chesak looks deeper into how one can better discuss loss and grief with children.  She states,

“Let’s be real. Grief is tough enough for adults — even though we understand that death is an inescapable part of life. The loss of a loved one is never easy, regardless of our age. That’s why when it comes to explaining grief to kids, we can get a big knot in our throat.”

To learn more about child grief and loss and to read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Article on Helping Children with Loss of Parent

Children who lose a parent need guidance, counseling and care.  The loss of a parent is a permanent loss that has life long implications for a child and it is important a child receives emotional support.  Children need to learn how to adjust to life but also still be secure.

Helping a child deal with the loss of a parent is a difficult thing. Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

The article, “How To Help Children Handle Grief After The Death Of A Parent” by Kelsey Borresen states,

For bereaved children dealing with the loss of an important figure like a parent, these intense feelings can be particularly hard to process. Kids need their surviving parent, caregivers or the other trusted adults in their lives to help them navigate the murky waters of grief.

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

 

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Article on Explaining Miscarriage

Miscarriages can be very confusing for children expecting a baby brother or sister.   Parents need to be able to explain the loss in a logical way to the child.  How to go about explaining loss can be difficult but it needs to be done in a sensitive but informative way

Explaining a miscarriage to a child can be difficult. Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

The article,  “How to Talk to Your Kid About Miscarriage” by Meghan Moravcik Walbert states,

“Despite how common miscarriage is, those who go through it often find it to be a painfully isolating experience. It frequently happens before the expectant mom or couple have told friends or family—or even their other children.”

Miscarriages happen in families and it is important to discuss with other children in the family.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

Grief Counseling Training Article on Play Therapy

Play therapy has always been a beneficial tool in helping children in counseling.  Expressing grief is no different.  Children are able to express grief and trauma through play.  A counselor is then able to help the child express the grief in a productive way through play therapy.

Play therapy is an excellent way to help children communicate grief.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
Play therapy is an excellent way to help children communicate grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, How play therapy can help children heal, by Karen Marley looks at the benefits of play therapy.  She states,

“Play therapy is an evidence-based practice that helps a child build a greater sense of self. When engaged in play therapy, a child uses his or her entire self – mind and body – to express unconscious fears, thoughts, wishes and feelings.”

Please click here to review the entire article.

AIHCP offers a certification in Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling which can help prepare counselors for dealing with child grief.  Please review our full Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Child Grief Counseling Program Article on Children and the Dying

Great article regarding children and visiting a dying loved one.  It is important to include children in the grieving process as well.  Please also review our Child Grief Counseling Program

Helping children grieve by visiting the dying is important decision by parents
Helping children grieve by visiting the dying is important decision by parents

The article, Five ways to prepare young children to visit a loved one who is dying,  by Jessica Hinton states

“Death and dying can be scary and uncomfortable subjects, so parents understandably may shy away from them and wonder if it’s a good idea to take their children to visit a relative or loved one in the hospital or a hospice facility. I wrestled with this when my grandmother was dying and ultimately chose to take my children to visit her in the hospital in her final days. I don’t regret that choice, because it gave the kids a chance to get to know her and also helped them start to understand that death is a normal part of life.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Article on Grandparents and Grandkids

Good article on how grandparents can better talk to their grandchildren about grief.  Children grieve differently and need help expressing and understanding it.  Sometimes only grandparents are available or in the child’s life

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program
Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

The article, How to speak to your grandchildren about grief and death, by Starts at 60 Writers states

“Grief can be one of the hardest emotions to deal with at any age, but for a small child, it’s also extremely confusing and can be very scary.

That’s why children so badly need the adults in their lives to help them make sense of the emotions they may be feeling, and while parents play a huge role in this, grandparents are a much-needed support to their grandkids too, especially if the parents aren’t available or are suffering with grief themselves.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program

 

Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Certification Article on Forgotten Mourners

So many times children are forgotten in the grieving process or left out of the news regarding it.  This article looks to correct this erroneous view.

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Certification
Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Certification

The article, Children are the ‘hidden mourners’ in our society, says child health expert, Source; CBC, states,

“Sir Albert Aynsley-Green was just ten years old when his father died unexpectedly in hospital. That event set a path for his own life: his decision to become a pediatrician and his current focus on helping children deal with bereavement and grief.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling Program Certification to learn more

Grief Counselors WhoTreat Self-Harm in Children and Adolescents

 

How can grief counselors help children who wish to harm themselves?
How can grief counselors help children who wish to harm themselves?

The article, “Treating Self-Harm in Children and Adolescents”, source; Wellington Retreat

“What is considered self-harm? Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Department of Pediatrics and Human Development Professor Donald Greydanus, M.D.”

American Institute Health Care Professionals‘s insight:

Grief counseling should attempt to pinpoint adolescent issues regarding self harm.  Grief counselors can help children find out why they wish to harm themselves.  Usually child grief stems from unresolved grief, low self esteem, trauma or other similar psychological pathologies.  Grief therapy and some grief counseling may be beneficial.

If you wish to become certified as a grief counselor then please review the program.  The program consists of core courses that lead to certification.  Qualified professionals include anyone is the healthcare profession or social science fields, whether licensed or possessing an undergraduate degree.  One can also re-certify after three years.

If you wish to become a grief counselor then please review this program if it matches your professional and academic needs.

In the meantime, please enjoy the article and blog.

 

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