Grief Counseling Training Article on Murdered Child

Losing a child is the ultimate loss.  The loss can be worst if that child is murdered.  All of these circumstances create the perfect storm for the worst type of grief a person can experience.

Losing a child to murder or violence is one of the worst pains in existence. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
Losing a child to murder or violence is one of the worst pains in existence. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, “‘This doesn’t go away’: When your child is murdered, grief is only the beginning” by Ashley Luthern states,

“The outside world did not seem to care much about her son, either. Anthony’s death, the 85th homicide of the year, warranted a few clips on TV broadcasts and three paragraphs in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.  Certain manners of death — like a homicide or drug overdose — carry a social stigma that can be isolating and possibly lead to something called “disenfranchised grief,” said Handel, the psychotherapist.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it can help you in your professional endeavors of helping others through grief

Grief Counseling Training Article on Grief and Gaming

With so much negativity surrounding video games, it is good to hear some healthy benefits of them.  This is especially true in the case of grief.  Video games allow individuals to live their emotions through other avatars.  This can also be a very beneficial experience, especially in grief.

Video games can help individuals cope with grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification
Video games can help individuals cope with grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Certification

The article, “How Video Games Help Us Process Grief” by Dana Folkard looks at how video games help the gamer deal with and express grief.  The article states,

“We need a distraction from grief, something that has the potential to re-connect us with life. For some, video games can serve this purpose. For others it may be strenuous gym workouts, work, eating, drinking, walking, gardening and so on.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Many role playing video games give the person the escape they need from grief.  It enables them to live life through another, experience loss through others and relate with the character.

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it meets your academic needs.

Grief Counseling Training Article on Play Therapy

Play therapy has always been a beneficial tool in helping children in counseling.  Expressing grief is no different.  Children are able to express grief and trauma through play.  A counselor is then able to help the child express the grief in a productive way through play therapy.

Play therapy is an excellent way to help children communicate grief.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
Play therapy is an excellent way to help children communicate grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, How play therapy can help children heal, by Karen Marley looks at the benefits of play therapy.  She states,

“Play therapy is an evidence-based practice that helps a child build a greater sense of self. When engaged in play therapy, a child uses his or her entire self – mind and body – to express unconscious fears, thoughts, wishes and feelings.”

Please click here to review the entire article.

AIHCP offers a certification in Child and Adolescent Grief Counseling which can help prepare counselors for dealing with child grief.  Please review our full Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Grief Counseling Training Article on Tips for Grief in the Workplace

Grief in the workplace occurs because employees are human beings and they experience loss.  Sooner or a later an employee will deal with loss and need bereavement time but also a listening ear at work.   It is important to both balance the need of the employee and also the need of the company or business.   This article offers a few tips on how to deal with grief in the work place helping the employee express him or herself as needed and also maintain a productive work environment.

Helping your employee through grief in the workplace is beneficial for both you and him. Please review our Grief Counseling Training
Helping your employee through grief in the workplace is beneficial for both you and him. Please review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, “Tips for Coping with Grief in the Workplace” by Valerie Sanchez looks at greater detail into this issue.  She states,

“Coping with grief in the workplace is all about communication. Communicating feelings, expectations, responsibilities, deadlines, support and more. If managers and teams communicate, those grieving can work through grief at work and the team can get back on track in an environment that helps the grieving employee heal and resume normal productivity.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

 

Grief Counseling Training Article and National Tragedies

National tragedies from natural disasters to shootings are hard for the collective national well-being.  They bear down on millions of people creating a hybrid of emotions that affect everyone from rage to sadness.  Collectively, an anxiety exists in America of where and when the next national tragedy will occur.  Almost weekly, an unnecessary and devastating shooting occurs where innocent individuals die.  This ultimately has an affect on Americans.

National tragedies can cause collective grief.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
National tragedies can cause collective grief. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

First, Americans are affected collectively.  They are saddened by the death of innocent people and also enraged at injustice of these incidents.   This leads many in collective national grief to expressing themselves politically and publicly.  The nation seeks answers but also grieves.  Everyone grieves differently and activism is a major venue for many Americans to voice their grief, anger and frustration.

Besides the collective grief and therapeutic methods to combat this national grief, many Americans also experience this grief on a personal level.   New fears emerge within everyone.  Whether at worship, school, or shopping, the fear of a masked gunman is always in the back of the mind of Americans.  This anxiety associated with this national grief is something that all Americans must face.   Some Americans will deal with this anxiety by closing themselves up, or others will be proactive and always be vigilant and alert.  Other Americans will look to arm themselves to regain that loss sense of security that has been stolen.

Whether through activism for better gun control laws, or through utilizing one’s right to bear arms to defend oneself, the psychological reaction to national grief and tragedy will have profound effects on how Americans cope with these continuing losses.

Of course, the ultimate reality is those who experience these losses directly, whether a survivor of an attack, or a family member who loss a loved one in an attack.  Survivors will face a multitude of issues associated with grief, ranging from PTSD to survivor guilt.   The attack will be replayed in their minds constantly.  What could I have done differently?  Or I should have died not my friend!  These thoughts will all become thoughts tormenting the survivor.   Some survivors will also deal with secondary losses, such as an injury that will haunt them for the rest of their lives, or be tormented mentally with flashbacks from the traumatic event.   The road to recovery for a survivor of a shooting is not an easy one indeed

As for family members, a myriad of grief thoughts will cross through their mind.  Not only is the loss unexpected, but it is also traumatic and illogical.  These family members will face years of torment and second guessing on “why”?   This is not an easy fix for these family members either.  They will undoubtedly undergo profound changes and look to cope with grief years after in different ways.

After the initial sting, depression and complications of such a horrible loss, family members may look to remember or try to create better laws to try to make some sense for the illogical and unexplainable loss of their loved one.

Bad things can happen and how we handle it is what matters most.  Please review our Grief Counseling Training
Bad things can happen and how we handle it is what matters most. Please review our Grief Counseling Training

We already see this anger and coping towards social ills and bad laws by family members in the news, as many of them, as well as survivors, become public figures for gun control laws.   This in many ways is the new role they have inherited and a way to make sense out of chaos and remember the lost of their loved one.  Whether misdirected or a good idea, gun control laws will remain a central theme in these shootings.  Whether it is better control of gun sales, or better laws against those who misuse guns, the public and political spotlight becomes for both sides a way to push an agenda.  Sometimes, individuals who are victims of these crimes will use this as a way to heal, while unfortunately many others may be used by various lobbyists to further agendas.

Despite the national grief and agendas, those who suffer these crimes will have a hard and steep uphill battle in dealing with their grief.  It will not be an easy journey but one that is necessary in healing and also understanding their new chapter in life.    It is a chapter they will not want but a chapter they nonetheless will need to read.   As a nation we need to read it with them and help them.

If you are interested in learning more about Grief Counseling Training or would like to become certified in Grief Counseling, then please review the program and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.

Bereavement Counseling Training Article On Tragedy and Grief

Only look at the news and almost everyday a heartbreaking tragedy is occurring.  Religious and school shootings, natural disasters, and unneeded death are all far too common.   This leaves a mental mark on society as a whole and a universal grief that all deal with.   It is difficult enough to deal with national grief but sometimes very bad things occur to us as well.  In those cases, we have to deal with grief associated with great tragedy as well.

How do we deal with grief and religious tragedy such as in Pittsburgh?
How do we deal with grief and religious tragedy such as in Pittsburgh?

The article, “How Do You Deal With The Grief After A Sudden Tragedy?” looks at a variety of opinions on how to deal.  The article and video states,

“The Pittsburgh synagogue massacre has shocked the nation and devastated the victims’ families. The grieving process can be a long one, but psychiatrist M. Katherine Shear says there are several things people need to do to be able to move forward in their lives after a loss like this.”

To read the entire article, please click here

To learn more about helping others face grief in the wake of tragedy please review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your academic and professional needs

Grief Counseling Training Article on Grief of Mother Orca

A sad story of grief of a mother whale who lost a calf.  This story shows the universal nature of grief even in nature and how more advanced animals experience it and share it collectively.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Training to learn more and possibly become certified in Grief Counseling

Grief is not just for humans. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your professional needs
Grief is not just for humans. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training and see if it matches your professional needs

The article, After 17 Days And 1,000 Miles, A Mother Orca’s ‘Tour Of Grief’ Is Over, by Jenny Gathright states,

“After carrying her deceased baby for at least 17 days and 1,000 miles, an orca mother has shown signs of returning to normal.

She was seen Saturday with fellow members of her pod, chasing a school of salmon. She is no longer carrying her baby, and she looks healthy.”

To read the entire article, please click here to review
Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

Grief Counseling Training Article on Complicated Grief

Good article on complicated grief.

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, A name for grief that goes on and on, by Jacqueline Howard states,

“Stephanie Muldberg felt like she would be sad forever. She felt isolated and preferred to sit alone at home, overcome with waves of emotion — anger, guilt and bitterness.”

To read the entire article, please click here
Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

Grief Counseling Training Article on the Loss of A Child

Sad article on the reality of losing a child and the hard recovery from that loss.

Losing a child can be devastating. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training
Losing a child can be devastating. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training

The article, Lessons of loss: Parents share advice on how to survive the death of a child, by Joline Gutierrez Krueger states,

“That first year was a blur, they say, an unreal realness punctuated by sobs, screams and a sense that even the simplest acts like getting out of bed or smiling or breathing were now beyond their abilities.”

To read the full article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training to learn more about helping others deal with this intense loss

Grief Counseling Training Article on Funerals and Dying

Good article on funeral and dying business.   It has become a financial burden for some when it comes to dying.

Dying has become expensive business. Please also review our Grief Counseling training
Dying has become expensive business. Please also review our Grief Counseling training

The article, The Difficult Business of Dying, by JESS BERGMAN states, 

“In the six years since my father died, I’ve visited the cemetery where his ashes are interred exactly twice—the second time only because of the Jewish tradition of unveiling, where the initial graveside funeral service is followed within a year by a  ceremony to uncover and dedicate the headstone.”

To read the entire article, please click here