Pet Loss Grief Support Program Blog on Pets and Ashes

When a dog or any type of pet dies, many retain the ashes and put their pet in a urn.  This is a way to keep the pet’s spirit close and within and also a way for the grieving to commemorate and honor their deceased pet.  It gives a sense of finality but also a sense of presence and peace.

Keeping the ashes of a pet is a way to remember and honor the pet. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program

 

The article, “The Moment a Dog’s Ashes Turn into a Pet: ‘Never Truly Leave Us’” by Jeff Salle looks at this moment and the power of spreading or keeping the ashes.  He states,

“It’s never easy to lose a pet. Bereavement of our beloved pets can have the same psychological impact as bereavement of other family members. Biscuit’s owners, who own a 12-year-old German Shepherd and Collie mix named Biscuit, captured a magical moment while scattering her ashes that has wowed the internet and given the grieving owners new hope.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Some find solace in releasing ashes at a pet’s favorite place, or keeping the ashes with them, but whatever the way, what matters most is how it helps one honor the pet and grieve in a healthy way.

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support Counseling.

Pet Loss Grief Support Counseling Program Blog on Time for a New Dog

Death and life are a cycle.  Ironically, joy and grief also coincide with each other.  The death of one loved one can be overlapped with the birth of another.  Pets are also an overlap of death and life.  Many individuals find new dogs or cats to love, while still grieving the loss of another.   Many individuals feel they may be replacing a past dog or cat, but the reality is, one is loving another while never forgetting the other.  It is like having multiple children.  No child replaces another but only enhances one’s life.

For many the decision for a new puppy can be difficult. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program

 

The article, “What I’ve Learned from Loving a New Dog While Grieving Another” by Annette McGivney looks at her journey of caring for a new dog, while still in the acute process of grieving the loss of another.  She states,

“Last April and May, I tried to live without a dog and focus entirely on grieving Sunny, but I soon found myself looking at puppies online at two in the morning. One thing led to another, and in early June I drove to Pueblo, Colorado, to pick up Trudy after a rescue organization reached out to me. My contact there knew I was planning to wait at least a year before bringing another dog into my life, but she convinced me to go for it. “This dog really needs someone who is active and can spend a lot of time with her,” she said. “You would be perfect.” Trudy’s elderly owner lived alone and had dementia. He had kept her isolated in a cement dog run for her entire young life.”

To read the entire article, please click here

The late comedian George Carlin once said, “life is a series of dogs”,  For many pet owners this is true.  It is not a series of replacements but a series of sharing life with new faces and one day hoping to see all those faces again together.

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief  Support Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Blog on Sudden Pet Loss

Like any death, sudden deaths cause extreme distress for people.  Unexpected loss is always painful and can lead to complications.  The same sudden loss of a beloved pet can be a horrible experience.  If one’s dog is hit, or cat is killed, or horse breaks a leg, can be unexpected and painful moments in anyone’s life.  Such sudden death should not be downplayed but respected and heard.

Losing a pet suddenly can cause complicated grief. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program

 

The article, “When death comes suddenly to a pet” by Katie Burns looks at the sudden death of a pet.  She states,

“In other cases, a pet owner might have been managing a pet’s underlying condition, and the pet dies suddenly from a fatal progression of that condition. In Florida, other notable causes of sudden unexpected death—but not unexplained death—are drowning in pools and even death by alligator attack.”

To review the entire article, please click here

There are so many ways our beloved animals can die.  If sudden, it can cause intense trauma and these feelings should not be kept in.  Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Blog on Getting a Another Pet

There is fear in many pet owner hearts that if they get a new pet then they are replacing the old.  This is common also with widows or widowers.  The reality the dog or cat is not being replaced.  Nothing can replace a beloved pet.  No new dog or cat can ever be the same but one can love more than one.  One can form new and unique bonds and share one’s hearts with other beautiful dogs and cats.  Always treasure the individual but try not to close your heart to others.

A new dog is not a replacement but something unique. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification

 

The article, “If you’re denying yourself the love of a new pet after a loss, please reconsider in 2022” by Dana Perino looks at finding the room in one’s heart to love another dog or cat in one’s life.  She states,

“My mind flashed forward to a future without a dog — a human survival instinct to protect yourself against future heartaches. That would be fine. I could do it. I’d have to if I lost Percy so soon after falling in love with him. Fortunately, none of that came true.”

Her story of her own loss and experience can serve as an example to love more and not close.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Pet Loss Grief Support.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Article on the Short Life of a Dog

One of the saddest things is losing a dog.  Losing a dog is painful because over the 10 to 15 years the dog in our life, he or she becomes an everyday staple.  Many wish dogs could live longer.  This is one of the things to consider when owning a dog that one will not have them for a life time but a series of them.  This may be sad but also gives one a chance to share life with many more.

Unfortunately for dog lovers, dogs live a very short life. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Support Program

 

In novels, we see individuals who live almost like immortal lives.  Our lives are almost immortal like when compared to a dog’s life and it teaches us to appreciate them while they are here.  We need to smile on the bad days they misbehave or tear up a shoe and we need to appreciate the love and energy they show us.  We are their entire world and we need to enjoy everyday they are with us.

The article, “It’s not fair that a dog’s life is so short” by Linda Smith states,

“Over the years, friends had warned me that the decision to let a cherished pet go was one of the most difficult they had ever made. At the time, I would nod and agree and move on with my day. As my dog got older, however, and this reality neared for me, I listened more closely to those stories of pet loss from friends.”

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it matches your academic and professional programs.  The program is online and independent study and open to professionals seeking a four year certification to help others deal with the loss of a pet.

Pet Loss Grief Support Program Article on Losing a Pet

Helping someone through the loss of a pet is something many consider trivial but it is not.  It is important to treat all losses as important and to learn how to help someone through listening and acknowledgement of their grief.

Good article on Pet Loss Grief. Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it meets your needs

 

The article, ‘LOSING A PET” from the USdesk looks at how to talk and listen to someone who loses a pet.  The article refers to some helpful ways to guide someone through the loss.  The article states,

“While losing a pet is painful and overwhelming, unfortunately, it can also be a very lonely process, as community support typically associated with death is absent when a pet dies. To make matters worse, grieving owners may feel embarrassed over the extent of their own heartbreak and feel ashamed to reach out to friends for comfort.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Pet Loss Grief Support Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification