Anger and Violence in Society

Anger is a complex emotion that is characterized by feelings of frustration, annoyance, and hostility. It is often triggered by a perceived threat or injustice. When someone feels angry, they may experience physiological changes such as an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. This can lead to aggressive behaviors such as yelling or violence.
Anger is a normal and healthy emotion. However, it can become problematic if it is expressed in unhealthy ways or if it is constantly present.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification.

The ability to control one’s anger is a critical life skill. Anger is a natural emotion, but it can become problematic when it is not managed in a healthy way. Some people have difficulty controlling their anger, which can lead to problems at home, work, and in social situations. There are a number of strategies that can be used to control anger. These include relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring, and problem-solving.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Courses

Anger management refers to the process of recognizing and regulating one’s own emotions, as well as the emotions of others. It is a skillset that can be learned and practiced in order to better manage aggressive impulses, handle conflict constructively, and maintain healthier relationships.
There are a number of different approaches to anger management, but all share the common goal of helping individuals identify and cope with the triggers and symptoms of anger in a more productive way.

When one does not manage one’s anger, a variety of issues can arise in life.  Hence it is critical to employ anger management strategies.  Anger however is seen in a variety of issues where it is not healthy or productive but dangerous to everyone.

Domestic violence is a large problem due to uncontrolled anger. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

Illicit anger can cause havoc in the home life.  Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.  Many families deal with domestic violence.  It may not just by physical in nature but may also be mental.  While men usually resort to physical abuse, many women can also be perpetrators through emotional abuse.

There is no one answer to addressing the issue of domestic violence. However, various experts agree that there are some key steps that can be taken in order to effectively address and prevent domestic violence.  Some of the key steps that can be taken to address domestic violence include: increasing public awareness and education about the issue, strengthening legal protections and penalties for perpetrators of domestic violence, and increasing access to support services for survivors of domestic violence.  If you are in immediate danger, call 911. If you cannot talk on the phone, try to text or use social media to reach out for help. Once you are safe, you can call a national hotline like the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

Dangerous anger is not just left at home but it can also follow one to the work place.  Displaced anger can travel back and forth between home and work and manifest in either environments.

Workplace anger is a type of emotion that is characterized by feeling mad or frustrated while at work. This type of emotion can be caused by a variety of things, such as feeling like you are not being appreciated or feeling like you are not being compensated fairly. Workplace anger can also be caused by feeling like your work is not fulfilling or challenging enough. Whatever the cause, workplace anger can lead to negative outcomes, such as decreased productivity, decreased job satisfaction, and even quitting your job.  In addition work place anger can lead to more violence with shootings via disgruntled individuals.

There are a few things you can do to stop workplace anger. First, try to identify the source of your anger. Is it your boss? A co-worker? Once you know who or what is causing your anger, you can try to address the issue directly. If that’s not possible or if the issue is not resolved, you can try to distance yourself from the person or situation that’s causing your anger. Finally, you can try to reframe your thinking about the situation.

In addition, anger and unresolved issues find its place in schools.  School shootings over unresolved anger or bullying can erupt quickly.  School violence is a serious problem in today’s society. It includes any form of violence, whether it is physical, verbal, or emotional, that takes place within the school setting. School violence can have a negative impact on the students, the staff, and the overall climate of the school. It is important for schools to take measures to prevent and address school violence.
Violence and anger in schools are a national crisis. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting

 

There are a number of ways to address the problem of school violence. One approach is to increase security measures such as metal detectors and security guards. Another approach is to provide more support services for students who may be at risk for violence. This might include counseling, conflict resolution training, and after-school programs.
Still another approach is to address the underlying causes of school violence. This might involve working with families and communities to reduce poverty and improve mental health services.  Teachers, administrators, and students all have a role to play in stopping school violence. By working together, we can make our schools safe places for learning
Lack of proper anger management and utilization of skills associated with it lead to these three types of violence.  It is important to see the issues that can erupt from the inability at a young age to control rage and anger.  The family and its interactions with society in public sphere all become affected by the inability to control the emotion of anger.  Again anger itself is not the villain but improper control of it.  When not controlled properly or managed, it leaks into every social aspect of society.
Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals. The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.
Additional Resources
Anger Management by WebMD contributors
Workplace Violence from the US Department of Labor

Silent Treatment and Anger Management

The silent treatment is a way of punishing someone by refusing to speak to them or acknowledge them. It’s a way of making them feel invisible and unimportant. It can be used as a form of control, to manipulate someone into doing what you want them to do. It can also be used as a weapon in an argument, to hurt and punish the other person. The silent treatment is a powerful tool, and it can be very effective in getting what you want from someone.   Anger Management can help individuals react properly to this passive aggressive form of punishment.

Silent treatment is a passive aggressive tactic. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

Learning to identify why someone is using this type of aggression upon oneself and how to react without becoming angry is critical.  Anger Management teaches one not only how to react to such treatment but also how to see how it is a poor way to cope as a person.   The article, “Why the Silent Treatment Is Such a Destructive Form of Passive-Aggression” by Bernard Golden looks closer at how silent treatment is used to control others.   He also discusses how use of the silent treatment can be a form of emotional abuse and how to properly deal with it.  He states,

“Being the target of silent treatment is a challenge for anyone, but it is especially difficult for individuals who already have low self-esteem as well as individuals who have anxious attachment. A part of this pattern includes fear regarding the stability and dependability of relationships—anxiety that is only provoked by silent treatment. Subsequently, more than others, they may be quick to feel intense rejection and fear of loss. Such silence is experienced as betrayal and abandonment. As reflected in one study, targets who could not attribute the ostracism to a specific cause were more likely to experience a threat to their belongingness and self-esteem than those who could identify a specific cause”

Why the Silent Treatment Is Such a Destructive Form of Passive-Aggression. Bernard Golden, Ph.D. Psychology Today. September 11th, 2022

To read the entire article, please click here

Commentary

It is important to not use this type of abuse nor react to it with more anger.  It is important to treat each other with respect and work with each other and not seek to punish each other via other passive ways of anger and control.  In reactions, Anger Management can be helpful against passive aggression.  Anger management is a process whereby an individual learns to recognize and control their own anger. It can be helpful in situations where someone’s anger is causing problems in their life, or when it feels out of control. The aim of anger management is not to eliminate all anger, but rather to teach people how to express it in a healthy way. There are a number of different techniques that can be used in anger management, including relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring, and problem-solving.  All of these strategies can help an individual better react to passive emotional abuse such as the silent treatment.  It can also help de-escalate the situation and force the other individual to face the issue at hand and communicate the problem in hopefully healthy way.

Silent Treatment

The silent treatment is a form of emotional abuse in which the abuser intentionally withholds communication from the victim, refusing to speak to them or engage with them in any way. The purpose of this behavior is to control the victim by inflicting psychological pain, making them feel isolated and helpless. This tactic is often used as a means of punishment, to make the victim feel guilty for whatever wrong they have supposedly committed.

The silent treatment is a form of psychological warfare that is often used in relationships. It is a way to control the other person by withholding communication and refusing to engage in dialogue. The goal is to make the other person feel powerless and helpless. The silent treatment can be used as a form of punishment or revenge. It can also be used to manipulate the other person into doing what you want them to do.

The silent treatment is a response to conflict that involves one person withdrawing from the interaction. This can be done verbally, by physically leaving the area, or by simply ignoring the other person. The goal of the silent treatment is to punish the other person or to make them feel uncomfortable.
There are a few ways to respond to the silent treatment. One way is to ignore it and not let it affect you. While this may be difficult, by applying anger management strategies and understanding the intent and purpose of the passive aggression, one can better react and respond to the treatment in a non violent and angry way.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the silent treatment is not an effective way to deal with anger. It can actually make the situation worse. If you’re angry with someone, it’s important to communicate openly and honestly. This will help you resolve the issue and maintain a healthy relationship.  Equally, it is important to be able to respond effectively when someone uses the silent treatment against you.  Primarily by not reinforcing the behavior via acknowledgement.  Sometimes though it may take restraint not to fall into the trap.  Anger Management plays a key role in helping individuals maintain a peaceful reaction.

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Training.  By completing the required courses,  behavioral health professionals can earn the four year certification.

 

Additional Resources

“Is the silent treatment a form of abuse?”. Jayne Leonard.  Medical News Today.  June 8th, 2020.  Access here

“11 Anger Management Strategies to Help You Calm Down”, Amy Morin, LCSW. Verywellmind. August 24th, 2022. Access here

“Anger Management”. Elizabeth Dougherty. Harvard Medicine. Spring 2022.  Access here

“How to Recognize the Signs of Emotional Abuse”. Ann Pietrangelo and Crystal Raypole. Healthline. January 28th, 2022. Access here

 

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on the Negative Results of Yelling

One thing angry people usually think nothing of is how they make others feel.  If there is one thing a good person who may have a temper should consider is how they make others feel and try to correct it.  Anger Management can help individuals develop skills to control tempers and reduce yelling.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

Yelling has negative effects on people. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

 

The reality is words and yelling have negative effects on friends and family.  The negative effects on family and friends are something those with a temper should take into consideration.  It is one of the biggest reasons to learn to control anger and a violent temper.

The article, “The Psychological Effects of Being Yelled At” by Carrie Modermo looks closer at how people are negatively affected through the yelling of angry individuals.  She states,

“Yelling is a common occurrence in most households, and it’s estimated that about 90% of American parents have reported using harsh verbal discipline at least once.1 This tends to use psychological force to cause emotional pain or discomfort. The purpose of yelling is usually to control another person’s behavior.2  Severe verbal discipline takes yelling to a new level and is more harmful. It may include swearing, cursing, name-calling, or insulting. This severe verbal discipline has been associated with conduct problems in children and adolescents. It may also lead to higher physical aggression, delinquency, and interpersonal problems.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

 

Anger Management Consulting Blog on Managing Hostility

Controlling anger and hostility is difficult for individuals who suffer from rage problems.  There are ways to better control anger in life and hostility but it takes a conscious effort to embrace peace, patience and calmness.  Learning to identify what fuels one rage and find better ways to respond it are all key elements to anger management.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program

Anger and hostility needs to be managed. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting and see if it meets your needs

 

The article, “Getting Anger & Hostility Under Control” from PsychCentral takes a closer look at managing anger and emotions.  The article states,

“In the world of stress research, anger and hostility are the most widely studied behavioral characteristics. Studies indicate that anger is the behavioral factor most highly correlated with an increased risk of coronary heart stroke, myocardial infarction and, possibly, high blood pressure. Other physical and behavioral stress problems are known to be directly influenced by stress. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Consulting.

Anger Management and Road Rage

Road rage can become a deadly encounter for many.  For many anger comes quick and when that anger affects the response behind a 2 ton vehicle with a simple brake or turn of the wheel, then drastic things can occur.  Many are killed in accidents due to road rage.  While driving or on the side of the road, fights and violent attacks can take place..  It is important to control anger behind the wheel and be considerate of other drivers.   Anger has no place when driving.  Anger Management can play a key role in helping individuals manage rage while driving.

Anger on the road can lead to fatal endings. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

It can take very little to offset someone into road rage.  How one turns, lack of turn signal, or illicit use of the horn can reciprocate an angry response.  It is important to be mindful of these things when driving and practice proper anger management skills.

The article, “Controlling Your Anger on the Roads” by Sarah Landrum looks closer at the dangers of road rage and how to avoid it.  She discusses various ways one can better channel their anger while driving.  She also lists how defensive driving can help put individuals in better situations so potential road rage does not emerge.  Aggressive driving is a primary culprit in road rage.   She states,

“Aggressive driving confrontations may unfortunately escalate to incidents of aggressive — or even deadly — attacks, and anyone can be the victim. Children, parents, school teachers, even celebrities — accounts of road rage fill the headlines daily and the victims span the spectrum. Of course, you can’t always control the acts of others. However, it’s important to monitor your own behavior. If you find yourself becoming frustrated by other drivers, it’s time to take a deep breath. Redirect your anger. Consider these tips for controlling your anger on the road.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Controlling Your Anger on the Roads. Sarah Landrum.  October 25th, 2016. PsychCentral

Commentary

Road rage can be defined as aggressive or violent behavior stemming from a driver’s frustration. This frustration can be caused by many things, such as heavy traffic, bad drivers, or stressful life events. When this frustration boils over, it can lead to angry outbursts and dangerous driving behaviors. Road rage is a serious problem because it puts everyone on the road at risk.  There are four primary types of road rage: verbal aggression, physical aggression, vehicle aggression, and indicators of aggression. Verbal aggression includes yelling, swearing, or making obscene gestures. Physical aggression involves any type of physical contact, such as pushing, shoving, hitting, or kicking. Vehicle aggression encompasses any dangerous driving behaviors, such as tailgating, cutting off other drivers, or braking suddenly.

Road rage is a very real phenomenon in the United States. According to a study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 66% of fatal car crashes involve some form of aggressive driving. This figure has been on the rise in recent years, and shows no signs of abating.  it is generally accepted that road rage is more common in urban areas than rural areas. This is likely due to the increased traffic congestion and stress that is associated with living in a city. Additionally, road rage is more likely to occur during rush hour traffic or when drivers are running late.

Reasons for Road Rage

There are a number of reasons that can contribute to road rage. One reason is the anonymity of being in a car. When people are driving, they can be more aggressive because they feel anonymous and removed from the consequences of their actions. Another reason is stress. People who are already stressed out are more likely to lash out when something else happens that adds to their stress, such as another driver cutting them off in traffic.  When people are already running late or feeling stressed, even a small delay can be enough to trigger an angry response.
Another reason for road rage is a sense of competition or territoriality on the road. Some people see driving as a test of skill and feel like they have to prove themselves every time they get behind the wheel.

Others feel the need to police the road and will attempt to correct or punish a driver who goes to fast, tries to pass or misuses a signal.  Lack of proper road etiquette can set others off against each other.  It is hence important to remember to follow the rules of the road, avoid competing, stop policing and mind one’s own business with good and safe defensive driving.  No one knows what another drive is capable of or willing to do to another driver.

Anger Management and Road Rage

Anger management refers to the process of recognizing and regulating one’s emotions, in order to prevent them from boiling over into negative behaviours, such as road rage.  Anger management prevents road rage by teaching people how to control their emotions. When people are angry, they may lash out and cause accidents. By learning how to control their anger, they can prevent road rage from happening.

Conclusion

Whatever may be bothering oneself, it is not worth road rage or the violence that can pursue it.  It is important to avoid being a victim of road rage via good defensive driving but it is also equally important not to become the source of it through aggressive driving or verbal insults.  Anger Management is key in preventing road rage and if someone has an anger issue, that person should then seek proper professional help to control one’ temper, especially while driving.

If you feel you have rage on the road, then please consider taking steps to prevent future road rage.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

Additional Resources

“What Causes Road Rage?”. Kaja Perina. June 10th, 2021.  Psychology Today. Access here

“Road Rage: How To Deal With It”. DMV.  Access here

“How to Manage Feelings of Road Rage”. Elizabeth Scott. January 19th, 2021. Verywellmind. Access here

“Measuring road rage: development of the Propensity for Angry Driving Scale”. Jason PDePasquale, et.al. Journal of Safety Research Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2001, Pages 1-16. Access here

 

Anger Management Program Article on Children and Anger

Teaching children how to cope with anger and emotion is a key parental responsibility.  It is critical to help children cope and control anger to avoid future social issues.  Children who are allowed to entertain anger without restraint will end up in prison. Hence parents need to learn and take a proactive role in guiding their children.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Program

Children need guidance with anger. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Program and see if it meets your goals

 

The article, “How to Raise Kids Who Are Good at Getting Angry” by Catherine Pearson discusses how to help children better cope through the emotion of anger.  She states,

“When it comes to kids and anger, it can help to remember a few simple facts: First, anger is a basic human emotion. And second, emotions exist to tell us about ourselves and our relationships, explained Dave Anderson, a clinical psychologist and vice president of school and community programs at the Child Mind Institute, a nonprofit that provides therapy to children and families. Emotions can help us to answer basic questions: What would we like more of? What would we like to stop?”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Program

The program is online and independent study and is open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Program

 

Anger Management Consulting Certification Blog on Anger and Men

Anger can take different forms in different genders.  Men are quite different than women and tend to express anger quite differently.  Men sometimes are more aggressive as well and when compounded with anger can turn to violence. While this does not say every individual reacts to anger based on race, there are enough studies to show that most men are more outward in expressing their anger.  It is important to understand how one expresses anger and why. Obviously there are more than just one’s gender to explain why some individuals are more angry than others, but gender does play a small part in understanding.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

How does anger manifest differently in men? Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification

 

The article, “Understanding Anger in Men” by Matthew Boland looks closer at the nature of anger and its expression within the male gender.  He states,

“Men are often thought of as angrier than women but multiple studies (like this and this) have shown that’s not the case. Men are, on average, more likely to express anger through outward aggression, which could partially explain why men are often perceived as angrier than women. Society generally views anger expressed by men as more socially acceptable than anger expressed by women. Anger causes short-term physiological changes in the body, which can contribute to other health problems over time for men.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals. The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management Training.

 

Anger Management Consulting Program Video on Anger in Relationships

Anger in relationships can turn two people against each other in the most toxic ways.  While it is important as a way to form boundaries when properly utilized, it can become abusive and hurtful if not properly managed.  Couples need to set boundaries, share emotions, but in a respectful way.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

 

Please review the video below

Anger Management Certification Article on Children and Abnormal Anger

Teaching children restraint with their anger is a basic parenting objective.  It is critical to show children how to behave and control emotion so that they can interact socially with others.  There are sometimes signs to watch for that may indicate deeper anger issues that will require stronger attention.  Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

Children need to learn to control anger at an early age. Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Certification

 

The article, “How To Tell If Your Child’s Anger Issues Are More Than Something Normal” by Ashley Werhli looks at somethings to watch out for in regards to pathological anger.  She states,

“Not a lot of moms may have anticipated that a large portion of motherhood was going to be playing the role of a therapist. Moms get so focused on caring for a child’s physical health and safety that they may forget that their child needs the to attend to their emotional needs as well. This may be a tricky road for some moms to navigate, especially when they don’t know how to help their child, or when something is really wrong.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Anger Management.

 

Anger Management Consulting Program Video on Difficult People

Difficult people are part of life.  Unfortunately sometimes they can become a big problem in the workplace.  One needs to learn how to manage anger when dealing with difficult people and allow one to lower oneself to their level.

Please also review AIHCP’s Anger Management Consulting Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification

 

 

Please review the video below on how to more effectively deal with difficult people.