Meditation Instructor Program Article on Relaxation Response and Healing

Stress and anger facilitates the “Flight or Fight” response in our bodies.  While temporarily good, if the physical reactions within the body continue over time or are not properly channeled, then damage to the body can occur.  Elevated heart beat and higher blood pressure are all temporary necessary results to deal with situations but in the modern world, stresses cannot be dealt with by fight or flight but must be managed.

The relaxation response can not only cope with the effects of stress but also help with healing. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic needs.

 

The Relaxation Response is the opposite reaction within the body, where a pre stress state is restored to the body.  It lowers the heart rate, lowers blood pressure and creates a more tranquil setting which is beneficial to the body.  Recent studies through bio feed back have proven to shown that one can facilitate these responses through a variety of meditation practices or techniques.  Meditation, in particular, Eastern meditation has shown to be able to elicit the relaxation response.

The Relaxation Response requires a quiet or peaceful setting and environment.  It requires a passive mindset.  It also requires an object of focus and a repeating phrase, mantra, or word to retain that focus.  Through this peaceful and gradual process, studies have shown that the relaxation response can be found.  It is far different than a mere sleep process, but various active brain waves continue to function as well as the state that reduces stress.  This is different than sleep and its critical importance at the REM phase and its own special health benefits.  The two states have different health aims and different purposes.

The Relaxation Response can be elicited from a variety of religious traditions.  It can be Christian in end or Eastern.  World religions seem to share in this common trait of producing this universal mental state within individuals who practice it.  However, non religious can also benefit from it and enter into with out any religious overtones.

What is incredible is that the human mind has the capability to alter change to the body.  It can, seen through biofeedback, produce changes in heart beat and pressure through meditation.  In some more extraordinary cases, Tibetan Monks were able to even alter body temperatures.   With this in mind, the power of the mind to alter subconscious responses is an important study within meditation and its battle with stress.

Meditation can put mind over matter in many ways. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program

 

The faith factor and the ability of the mind to alter minor realities in health and healing is extraordinary.  Not just altering bio rhythms within the body to reduce the effects of stress, but to also help heal.  Placebo effects, whether positive or negative can play huge roles in individual’s health or lack of.   The simple positive belief of the person in something or someone and that shared encouragement can play a key role in healing.  Meditation can also open these amazing benefits of self healing.  Again, the mind can play a pivotal role in helping the body heal itself by believing it.

If you would like to learn more about Meditation, stress reduction and the Relaxation Response, then please review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a Meditation Instructor.

 

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Meditation and Health

Meditation has beneficial effects on overall mental health and physical health.  The physiological effects are closely related to the relaxation response it triggers in the body.  This response naturally lowers blood pressure, breathing and other functions of the body.

Eastern Meditation although spiritual in origin has many physical and mental benefits. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program

 

 

The article, “The Science Behind Meditation” by Jennifer Wallis looks at the effects meditation has on brain waves, heart beats, blood pressure and breathing.  She states in the article,

“According to a study by Harvard University, the physiologic benefits of meditation – in this instance the relaxing form of transcendental meditation – relate to quieting the sympathetic nervous system and the activation of the parasympathetic branch – otherwise known as ‘rest and digest’. Medical studies have shown that individuals who practice transcendental meditation daily had lower blood levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol”

To read the entire article, please click here

From originally a spiritual discipline of the East, science has discover that meditation has many benefits physically.  The spiritual needs of Eastern Meditation required the quiet of the body.  This purpose had dual benefits to those of those Eastern faiths.  For Westerners and those of a secular nature, meditation can supply a healthy option to control blood pressure, heart issues and other problems related to stress.

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Relaxation Response

Individuals who experience chronic stress can also experience physical ramifications.  The body when stressed is induced to react to stress.  In doing so, the body through various hormones can increase blood pressure, muscular tension and alertness to react to the stressor.  This is critical to survival in itself and when one can react with a fight or flight response, one is able to avoid or confront the stressor.  Once the stressor is removed or conflict is avoided or defeated, the body naturally returns to pre stress levels.

The constant issue in modern society is that people cannot fight or flee everything.  Jobs and relationships demand other ways to resolve stressful issues.  If one is constantly besieged with stress and unable to properly cope with it, then the body is in an constant reaction to stress.   This has shown in the long term to cause damage to the body, most notably the arteries and heart.  Stress can kill over time and it is important to be able to regulate one’s response.

Meditation can invite the relaxation response to the body to overcome stress and other negative physiological results of stress upon the body. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

Fortunately, through study and bio feedback, it has been shown that one with training can better react to stress and also lower the body’s reaction to stress.  Primarily through meditation and other Eastern arts, one is able to learn to breathe properly when confronted with stress and to lower one’s reaction to it.  In fact after a stressful encounter, one can be taught to use the relaxation response to lower one’s bodily functions to pre stress levels.

Meditation, breathing, hypnosis and other alternative tools can be utilized to learn to control one’s inner response to stress but this takes commitment and training.  It has been studied that  Transcendental Meditation, Zen Yoga, Autogenic Training, and Progressive Relaxation had similar with some variable responses to oxygen consumption, respiratory rate, heart rate, muscle tension, blood pressure and alpha waves.

Dr Hess in the later part of the 20th century was the first to distinguish the effects of meditation on the body.   He came to the conclusion that many meditation practices create the opposite reaction as the body’s fight or flight response to stressors.  Meditation hence has a great ability to physiologically alter the body’s reaction to stressors as well as return the body to pre stress conditions.

Another amazing element discovered was that meditation, like sleep, lowers oxygen consumption.  Not even sitting calmly can lower this consumption like sleep, but what was discovered proved that meditation lowers consumption within minutes as compared to hours with sleep.  Also, alpha waves in the brain remained constant during meditation unlike sleep.   Meditation thus proved to be a great way to reduce the body’s flight or flight response and even as a way to prevent future stress reactions.   The studies did point out that while meditation is important in reducing stress it nonetheless did not replace the necessity of the body’s need for sleep and the benefits of REM.

If you would like to learn more about Stress Management as well as meditation then please review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program as well as AIHCP’s Stress Management Consultant Program.  Both programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking to earn a four year certification.

 

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Meditation Mistakes

Meditation is very useful for spiritual and physical purposes.  It can bring one closer to God and help one enhance a spiritual life but it can also from purely a secular view help one mentally and emotionally. It can help one remain focused and less stressful with the problems in life.  Stemming from this, it also reduces anxiety and other heart health related issues that stem from stress.  However, if one is not properly meditating, then many of these benefits can be lost.

Proper meditation is essential to reap the full benefits. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “Common Meditating Mistakes You Need to Avoid” by Clara Rose looks more close at common mistakes of meditation.  The article states,

“Meditation comes naturally to some people, while many others cannot attain a deep state of peace and relaxation. It happens because these individuals commit some common mistakes that prevent them from meditating. Meditation becomes easy when you avoid these common mistakes. ”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program can help one teach meditation but can also be used to learn how to properly meditate.  The program is also online and independent study and open to certification for qualified professionals.

Meditation Instructor Certification Article on Mindfulness and the Present

Meditation is a call to mindfulness of the present.  Many times, individuals are so focused on the past they cannot live in the present, or they are so paranoid about the future, they cannot enjoy the present.  Meditation can help one focus on the present.  Focus on the present is key because the present determines outcomes.  We need to acknowledge the present before it too becomes the past and understand the present as a key to the future.

Meditation can help individuals be more present. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Certification

 

The article, “Struggling to be more present? Look to meditation” by Marci Sharif looks at how meditation can help individuals be more present in their thinking.  She states,

“Have you ever noticed how strangely difficult it is to just be right here, right now?  Not recalling the past. Not considering what’s next. Not analyzing, judging, storytelling or narrating, but simply being here, purely in the moment, in a soft and open way.  It’s a completely different mode from what we’re used to — a far cry from living in our heads and reflexively reacting to the whims of our conditioned and compulsive thoughts.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification as a Meditation Instructor.

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Tips to Meditate

Meditation can sometimes be more difficult than it should.  People focus too hard or are too distracted.  Individuals are to conscious of what they are trying to do and are unable to find the peace meditation offers to them.

There are certain tips that can help you meditate. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your needs

 

The article, “7 Meditation Tips For Those Who Have A Hard Time Staying Still” by Ashley Tibbits discusses some tips to help one find mindfulness.  She states,

“Changing your mentality is just one thing you can do to make meditating feel more within your reach. From simple breathing exercises to creating your own cozy corner, there are a few tricks you may not have thought of that could help you start a habit that sticks.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Meditation can help one find peace and solace in these difficult times.  Please review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study for qualifying applicants.

 

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Meditation and Difficult Times

Difficult times can bring out the best or worst.  Grief and loss can make it difficult to focus and handle situations.  Meditation and focus can help one find centering during difficult times and help one be able to do what is needed during those times.

Meditation can help one find focus and centering during difficult times. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

The article, “A Practical Approach To Being Grateful And Mindful During Difficult Times” by Rob Dube looks at how meditation and mindfulness can help one during stormy times in one’s life.  He states,

“Mindfulness is a great skill for anyone who wants to create a better impact in business, and in our everyday lives. However, it also shows up when times get tough—and this proved especially true when Julianna was grieving the death of her parents.  Mindfulness didn’t make the pain of their passing vanish, but her practice built her an internal support system. It even helped Julianna find genuine gratitude during an unbelievably trying time.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see how it can help you utilize meditation but also train others in this key skill.

 

Meditation Instructor Program Article on Meditation and Sleep

With so many articles and so much information on meditation saturating the market, it is pretty much well known that meditation can help with almost anything.  Meditation then of no surprise can also help with better sleep habits.  Sleep is essential to good health and meditation can help one find better optimal health.

Lack of sleep can flood into our daily life. Meditation can help find better sleeping habits. Please also review our Meditation Instructor Program

 

The article, “A Guide to Sleep and Meditation” by Josh Hurst looks deeper into meditation and how it can help with sleep.  He states,

“While there are varying medications and traditional therapies available to treat this disorder, a natural remedy worth trying is meditation. Scientific studies have confirmed that the right meditation practices can be effective treatments for stress-induced insomnia. In this guide, we cover a few options.”

The article goes on to list numerous ways how meditation can help with sleep and how to find better sleeping habits.  To read the entire article, please click here

Sleep is so critical to good health and good overall daily performance in life.  Meditation and other alternative therapies can help one find the sleep they so desperately need.  Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

Meditation Instructor Certification Program Article on Office Meditation

Work and office like has its own challenges and stresses.  Meditation during breaks can help produce better results and less stress.  There are numerous benefits from practicing meditation during breaks at work.  Meditation has an ability to make the day more peaceful and productive.

Meditation can help office productivity. Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals

 

The article, “Six Proven Benefits Of Meditation In The Workplace” by Laura Sage discusses the importance of meditation and how it can benefit time at work.  She states,

“This fervent need for accessible mental health practices within our corporate culture goes beyond the crucial need for individual support. Regular mindful meditation among project teams, offices and departments also has lasting benefits, including building stronger bonds between employees, increasing productivity and increasing prosocial behavior.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  Many certified Meditation Instructors can also help offices initiate meditation programs for their employees.

 

 

Meditation Instructor Certification Article on Simple Practices In Meditation

Meditation is key in such a stressful and anxiety field social environment.  Learning how to make meditation work for you hence is very important.  Meditation can help remove one from stress filled environments and help one find the emotional and mental healing needed.  Knowing the best way to meditate for oneself is important in being able to accomplish this.

Meditation is important and knowing what works for you is even more important in meditation. Please also review our Meditation Instructor Certification

 

The article, “Five Ways To Make Meditation Simple And Practical” from Forbes reviews some basic ways to make meditation work for oneself.  The article states,

“In this post, I’d like to demystify meditation and break it down into it the simplest practices possible. You should be able to enjoy meditation for the stress-free experience it is. Let’s dive in and look at ways to make meditation simple and practical.”

To review and see what best steps and practices, please review the entire article by clicking here

Please also review AIHCP’s Meditation Instructor Certification.  The program is online and independent study and leads to a four year certification for qualified professionals.