Grief Counseling Program Article On Blue Monday

Seasonal depression in January is very common.  The festivities of the previous year and holidays are over and one is left with the grey, cold and dreary reality of January.  With less sun and light, it is naturally a depressive setting.  One who is already sad or even one who is mentally drained, or become sick may succumb to a type of seasonal depression.

The winter blues can play a big role in seasonal depression. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

It is important to notice if you are slipping into a seasonal depression and if needed seek help, but there are ways to cope with the January blues.  It is encouraged to remain physical active at a gym and find time to keep oneself in shape.  Staying in shape can give pride and self esteem to a dreary setting.  Also, consider a hobby to keep busy or a social group to be part of.  Favorite shows or special treats are also a way to keep oneself happy.  Go out to eat more or go to a movie.  Try to make a normal dreary weekday special by doing something!

The article, “‘Blue Monday’ Depression Peak Isn’t Real, But Seasonal Blues Are. Here’s What Do To About Them” from CBS Baltimore looks more at the idea of seasonal depression, especially in regards the third Monday of January.  The article states,

“There is generally more sadness in the winter time and January is not uncommon at all for overall more sadness among folks,” said Dr. Ravi Shah, a psychiatrist at Irving Medical Center at Columbia University. “So rather than dial in to one specific day, I think the more interesting question is what it is about the winter that affects our mood.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Whether a certain day can be more depressing or not is less likely but what is likely that winter in general can depress many people.  Some can stay above it and cope better than others but others need help and motivation.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Employees and Depression

Grief at work can lead to lack of production but it cannot be ignored.  It is important that it is addressed to not only benefit the business but to also help the employee.  Employers need to be understanding, flexible and know what to expect from their employee.  This requires leadership and sometimes a listening ear.  It requires a temporary adjustment potentially.  While large factories are less equipped to notice the needs of an individual, unions and friends should be aware.  Smaller businesses have the luxory and ability to better address the needs of the individual.

A depressed employee needs care and understanding so he can return to productivity. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

It is critical to not only help the employee emotionally but also to help them adjust for the benefit of the business itself.  While one does not wish to put money over emotion, there comes a time when the employee must learn to cope and play his or her part in the process, but without the understanding and leadership from good managers, this can be quite a hard thing.

The article, “How to Manage an Employee with Depression” by Kristen Bell DeTienne, Jill M. Hooley, Cristian Larrocha and Annsheri Reay look at the problems of depression and how a manager can help an employee at work who is suffering from depression.  They state,

“Yet despite this enormous and growing toll, many employers take an ad hoc approach to handling depression among employees. Many managers become aware of mental health issues only when they investigate why a team member is performing poorly. A better scenario would be if employees felt empowered to report a mental health problem and ask for a reasonable accommodation so that their manager can intervene to minimize the damage to the organization and help the employees return as quickly as possible to full health.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Employers who are more considerate to depression and the mental health of their employees are not only showing compassion but also good business sense.  Employees are a company’s top resource and making sure they are happy and productive is critical to success.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

 

 

Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Addiction and Grief

Drinking and depression are tied together.  Many individuals when they feel depressed or sad feel the need to drink to escape the pain.  This form of escapism can lead to addiction.  For others it can be a temporary refuge from the issues presenting themselves, but the issue still remains.  Dealing with grief requires healthy coping mechanisms not detrimental ones through drugs and drinking.

Alcohol and depression are tied together closely. Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program and see if it meets your professional needs

 

The article, “What to know about alcohol and depression” by Zawn Villines takes a closer look at the connections that exist between depression and alcohol.  He states,

“Some people with depression drink alcohol to ease their symptoms. Over time, this can lead to alcohol dependence and abuse.  People who drink to cope with psychological distress may drink more over time, especially when they wake up feeling anxious or depressed. Chronic drinking significantly increases the risk of alcohol abuse.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training Program as well as our Substance Abuse Consulting Program.  Both programs help prepare professionals to help others with grief and addiction.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Season Depression

Seasonal depression is very common.  In the middle of January through most of the remaining Winter individuals begin to long for Spring.  The grey skies, lack of holiday fun, and cold and damp weather can influence one negatively.  With sickness and aches, individuals can succumb to depression more easily.  It is important to stay alert, active and positive minded when dealing with the lack of light, cold and depressive weather.  It is important to be find joy and fun in these days.

The winter months can lead to seasonal depression. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

The article, “Fighting off gloomy-weather depression with simple habits” from KTVO looks at how depressing weather can negatively affect a person.  The article states,

“SAD, is a type of depression that affects people at the same time each year, typically late fall through the winter months.  The disorder is more common in women than men and young people have a higher risk of developing it. With the conditions for most starting in their 20’s.  The changes in your mood are driven by chemicals in your body like serotonin and melatonin. Serotonin is thought to affect mood and appetite while melatonin will give the urge to sleep and wake up.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Seasonal depression is real and needs to be addressed.  If you feel it coming on, find help.  Certified grief counselors can help, as well as licensed professional counselors.  It is important to remain positive and healthy in the darker months of the year.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is independent study and online and certified an individual for four years.

Grief Counseling Program Article on Dealing with Grief While at Work

Grief is difficult to deal with.  It forces us to adapt and change.  Through this change, it can be distracting and painful.  Unfortunately, many of us cannot walk away from life but must learn to cope with grief while attending school or working.  This is a difficult process but sometimes can also be therapeutic.  It frees the mind and gives us some normalcy.  Some may even attempt to escape into work to avoid the pain.  This is as much a problem as those who cannot focus on work due to grief.

Learning to adjust at work is important.  Life must go on.  It is important to let your manager or supervisor know of your situation. It may be important also to find counseling to help one adjust.  It can definitely be tough to work while grieving but it is something one must do.

 

Working while grieving can be very difficult for some. Some consider a burden others an escape. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

The article, “7 ways to deal with grief at work” by Erica Sweeney looks the difficulty of coping while at work but looks at ways to help individuals move forward with their career task.  She states,

“Many employees aren’t able to take much time off from work to process a loss. While 88% of employers offer bereavement leave, according to the Society for Human Resource Management, it averages about three days. That amount can vary greatly, however, since no federal requirements for bereavement leave exist. TheFamily and Medical Leave Act doesn’t specifically cover it, and the Fair Labor Standards Act doesn’trequire paid time off to attend funerals.”

To read the entire article, please click here

With careers and work so important to financial stability, it is critical to overcome grief to the extent one can cope while at work.  While we cannot escape grief, we have to be able to live with it.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Divorce and Loss

Grief and loss do not always involve death.  Losing anything is the recipe for grief.  One of the most common forms of loss is divorce.  Romantic breakups are tough but marriages that fail are even tougher.  Marriage does not only involve the heart, but it also involves a sacred vow.  The loss removes one from consistency of schedule and thrusts one into a new environment.  Furthermore, the loss has many secondary losses associated with it.  Financial burden, loss of possessions, less time with children or pets, as well as legal stress all play a large role in divorce.

Divorce loss is far more than just a broken heart but affects one’s entire existence. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

 

This is why divorce is such a stressful and painful process.  It is an uprooting of one’s life.  It may be for the best, but the process of healing takes many years to finally become whole again.

The article,” 12 Strategies For Dealing With Grief After A Divorce” by Karen Finn looks deeper at the types of losses.  She states,

“Dealing with grief after a divorce is no different. Nearly 50% of marriages (and 41% of first marriages) in the United States will end in divorce or separation. Divorce grief is, therefore, a high-odds reality.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Training Program Article on Ecological Grief

The loss of nature and ecological destruction plays a large role on humanity.  Individuals suffer from the devastation and grieve the loss of what was once.  These types of losses of beauty as well as climate problems cause distress.  This type of grief and anxiety is ecological grief.

Ecological grief is a true loss that we suffer as a society. Please also review our Grief Counseling training program

 

For instance, some may fear the loss of beauty found in the rain forest or the coral reef.  The beauty but also the instrumental role they play in our climates are a twofold loss of what we all experience with their destruction.

The article, “How to cope with the grief that comes with the world’s ecological crisis” by John Sharry looks into this type of loss.  He states,

 

“Many of those working within the environmental charities describe their heartbreak and grief at the loss of the natural world. This is the natural world which is not only beautiful in its own right but it is the world on which we entirely depend on as humans. For communities on the frontline of the climate emergency this grief is much more acute and threatening.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Training program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Program Article on Meaning in Grief

Grief is a universal emotion that strikes humanity’s most existential questions.   With pain, suffering and loss, many try to find meaning in grief.  Finding meaning and coping with grief is a life skill that all must learn to deal with if they expect to work through the pains of life.   Sometimes it is difficult to find meaning and others need help tying the narrative of life together from loss to loss.  Each loss creating a chapter in the overall book of life.  Loss is always a result of something good and ironically if we never lost, then we would never have.  Love is the purpose of life and unfortunately tied to love is loss.  While in this temporal valley of tears, humanity’s existential journey is about balancing love and loss and understanding how to create a life narrative that somehow makes sense.

Finding meaning in grief can be difficult. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “Finding Meaning in Grief” by Julie Phitzinger discusses trying to find meaning in loss.  She states,

“For Kessler, a noted grief expert,  finding a path forward became an unexpected and integral part of his life.  While Kessler was writing this book,  his son David, who had overcome a drug habit only to start using again, died in 2016 at the age of 21.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Grief Counseling Program Article on Grief and Holidays

Grief is difficult but it becomes more difficult with the holidays.  Holidays can remind us of times spent and re-open wounds of loss.  This is why Christmas or Thanksgiving can be so difficult to navigate for those dealing with a loss, especially a recent loss.

Grief can be more difficult during the holidays because it reminds us of the past
Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic needs

The article, “Navigating the Holidays with Grief” by Laura Wade looks at the particulars of dealing with grief during the holidays and how to better cope and deal with loss.  She states,

Holidays are typically considered happy times celebrating with family and friends. However, when someone has experienced a loss, the holidays can magnify the feelings associated with grief such as sadness, anger, guilt or regret.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Grief Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Grief Counseling Program Article on Living Grief and Terminal Illness

Grief is more about just physical loss but also the thought of loss itself.  When someone is diagnosed with an illness or disease that is terminal, one has yet to lose but acknowledges that loss will come.  This type of anticipatory grief is very common with family who live with terminal diagnosis of a loved one.  Parents can also live with this type of loss when a child is diagnosed with a disease, terminal or not.  They have to live with the new reality imposed by the disease or the potential future of loss.  This can create an uneasy existence of hope and loss existing side by side.

Sometimes while anticipating loss, we still must enjoy the present. Please also review our Grief Counseling Program

The article, “The ‘Living Grief’ I Carry After My Child’s Diagnosis” by Kat Barlow looks at this type of living grief.  She states regarding a family and their child Noah and his terminal diagnosis,

“Noah has a living life list, not a bucket list. The difference being, we are not waiting for the end. We are instead celebrating and living life now. We seize every opportunity to make memories. We make time; we don’t sweat the small stuff. We cancel appointments to sit in the sunshine instead. We make up stories.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Living and dealing with grief with hope and love is a difficult thing to do but sometimes it is the best thing to do even if darker days lay ahead.  One cannot deny the future, but one can definitely love the present.  Please also review our Grief Counseling Program