Jesus or Barabbas?

Do you choose Jesus or Barabbas in your life? Please review our  Christian Counseling Courses
Do you choose Jesus or Barabbas in your life? Please review our
Christian Counseling Courses

Jesus or Barabbas? – Dr. Ray Pritchard Christian blog and commentary on Crosswalk.com.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.crosswalk.com

Great article about Jesus and Barabbas and how it applies to us, as sinners, and Christ as an innocent man and our salvation.  Do you choose the world or Christ as well?  So many times we choose the wrong thing in life, it is critical in our spiritual life we choose Christ, the correct choice.

Please review our Christian Counseling Courses and continue to have a blessed Lent

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The Power of the Cross: Where True Freedom is Found

Please review our program for Christian Counseling Certification, then please review
Please review our program for Christian Counseling Courses.  The cross is freedom!

Only in One can true freedom be found. Only in One can we be made new. Only in One can we find lasting peace and hope.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.crosswalk.com

An excellent article about how true freedom is actually found in submission to Christ, who frees us from the illusions of the world and the sin that attempts to enslave us.

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Premarital Sex?

Premarital sex takes the sting of the word fornication away and that is a bad thing.  if you would like to take Christian Counseling Courses, then please review
Premarital sex takes the sting of the word fornication away and that is a bad thing. if you would like to take Christian Counseling Courses, then please review

Christians talk a lot about premarital sex. And I think that’s a mistake, for one, because the grammar is skewed. (Read more)

Source: www.crosswalk.com

Good article on the issue with the term premarital sex and fornication–especially with how the other word implies a wrong time, but not in essence an evil action within itself.

This is a common sin, among Christians–some who struggle with it and others who find no wrong in it, but this article correctly points out the broken covenant it represents.

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Keeping Our Conscience Sharp

Christian Counseling and a Certain and Right Conscience

Christian Counselors need to constantly remind people of sharpening their conscience.  Our consciences can become weak overtime when we are overexposed to secular life and immoral conversation, pictures and friends.

Keeping a strong conscience requires examination and prayer
Keeping a strong conscience requires examination and prayer

With this in mind, it is extremely important to watch our company and to constantly train ourselves to feel the slightly prick from the slightest sin.  By examination of conscience each night, we can review our daily activity and acknowledge if our actions conformed with Christ.  We should not fall into the despair of scruples, but maintain a healthy reaction to each failure.  In our failures is our human nature and Christ does not wish to haunt us with them but merely to acknowledge them and have a firm purpose of amendment.

It is truly amazing when one begins to realize the “pleasures” of past that are truly seen in their true light.  The will pursues these illusionary goods, as Eve purused the forbidden fruit.  With a sharper conscience, we are more attuned with the Holy Spirit and his grace.  We are able to detect the dirt of sin and the littlest stain on our soul upsets us.  This is the type of certain and rightly formed conscience we need.

If you are interested in learning more about Christian Counseling Courses, then please click here.

Mark Moran, MA

A Video on AIHCP's Program In Christian Counseling and Christian Counseling Courses

Christian Counseling Certification and Christian Counseling Courses

AIHCP proudly offers a program in Christian Counseling that reflects the teachings of Christ and the Gospel.  The video below illustrates how the program works.
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV2SWcNyOG4
If you are interested in Christian Counseling Courses, then click here
After completion of the Christian Counseling courses, qualified professionals can become certified.  To renew certification one must accumulate an additional five hundred hours of clinical and academic work in the field.  Also required are additional fifty hours of recertification courses in Christian Counseling.
Thank you for your interest and if you have any questions, please let us know.
 
AIHCP

A Video on AIHCP’s Program In Christian Counseling and Christian Counseling Courses

Christian Counseling Certification and Christian Counseling Courses

AIHCP proudly offers a program in Christian Counseling that reflects the teachings of Christ and the Gospel.  The video below illustrates how the program works.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV2SWcNyOG4

If you are interested in Christian Counseling Courses, then click here

After completion of the Christian Counseling courses, qualified professionals can become certified.  To renew certification one must accumulate an additional five hundred hours of clinical and academic work in the field.  Also required are additional fifty hours of recertification courses in Christian Counseling.

Thank you for your interest and if you have any questions, please let us know.

 

AIHCP

How did Jesus understand death?

The article, “How did Jesus understand his death?”, by Brian Zahnd states

“How did Jesus understand his own death?
What meaning did Jesus give to his crucifixion?
Did Jesus have a “theology of the cross”?”

American Institute Health Care Professionals‘s insight:
Good article on how Jesus viewed his own death and how the secular world viewed it only to be overturned by the court of God.  Learn to understand death how God does.  If you are interested in Christian Counseling Courses, please click here
Our Christian Counseling Courses are based off of sound Christian teaching and do not deviate from the teachings of Christ.  Qualified professionals who take our Christian Counseling Courses can become certified.

See on www.patheos.com

Extraordinary and Saintly Love in the Desert of Sinai and Training in Christian Counseling

Training in Christian Counseling: Holy Nun of the Sinai Encompasses Christian Compassion

Obeying Christ’s command to see him in all, Sister Aziza fulfills Christ’s promise and fulfills Christian Compassion.  This saintly nun’s burning love for Christ goes out to the least of her brethren, especially runaway migrants from human trafficking gangs that plague the Desert of Sinai.

From CNN, Elise Labbot and Don Morgan report about this remarkable women and the horrendous atrocities being committed in this region.  In their article, “Sister Gives Hope To Trafficed Migrants”, they tell this story.

“For thousands of African asylum seekers fleeing danger via Egypt’s Sinai desert, one woman serves as an oasis after their harrowing journey into Israel.
She was born in Eritrea as Azezet Habtezghi Kidane. In the migrant shelters of South Tel Aviv, she is known simply as Sister Aziza.”

To read the rest of the article, please click here

It with such admiration, that all Christians should imitate Sister Aziza in caring for those who have no where else to hide from unjust persecution.
If you are interested in Christian Counseling Courses, please click here and review the program.  Our training in Christian Counseling includes core Christian Counseling courses that are required for certification in Christian Counseling.

Mark Moran, MA

Christian Counseling Courses: The Inner Essence of Prayer

Christian Counseling People to a Better Prayer Life

 
In past blogs, we discussed the external nature of prayer, its purposes and benefits.  In this blog, I would like to discuss key points that should be highlighted in one’s prayer life.  Many of these ideas stem from St. Teresa of Avila and other saints whose experience in meditative prayer far outweigh our own.  However before delving deeper into prayer itself, I think we can find the core of prayer found in the words of Christ in the “Our Father“.
Our Lord taught us a few key concepts in the “Our Father”.  First, charity abounds in the “Our Father”.  It adores the Father and seeks forgiveness for one’s enemies.  Second, petition of needs is addressed through the phrase “give us this day our daily bread”.  Yet in this petition, Jesus reminds us that it is the will of the Father that must supersede our own.  Third, contrition of one’s sins is found in the prayer along with spiritual aid against evil.  Of course thanksgiving is implied throughout the prayer and is an essential element of  the prayer.  From these standards, we find the key elements of adoration, petition, contrition and thanksgiving.
Yet it is so amazing to hear when people ask how should I pray.  While ritualistic prayers are wonderful, some people merely mumble the words without any true thought.  Others have no idea on what to say.  The simple reality is love.  If you love God, there is no true structure to follow but to simply love him and please him.  One will be filled with the spirit and find the necessary words to express one’s feelings.
As one delves deeper and deeper into a relationship with Christ, one can experience many exchanges with Christ.   Some can involve consolations or feelings of rapture and love.  Others could possibly involve visions of physical, spiritual or intellectual natures.  Some times in prayer one will experience an intense devotion, while in other sessions of prayer, one will experience an aridity due to no fault of their own.  In other circumstances, one may feel great certitude of what the Lord desires, while in other cases, one may doubt if it was the Lord or one’s own inner voice.
These are all the inner complexities of prayer life.  As one contemplates the life of Christ or invokes dialogue with the Lord, one can find his true voice through pure love, humility and union of will.  Discernment of our Lord’s will can come through a Christian Counselor or Spiritual Advisor who can help one through prayer life.  However, one can rest assured that it is from God if over time it produces good fruits, for the tricks of the evil one can never bring forth abundance of good.  Nor does the promises of the evil one produce fervent love of God or increase sanctity.  Intsead, it produces a lack of peace and confusion.  St. Ignatius and St. Teresa both emphasize this fruit of Satan.  They remind us that as one progresses in prayer life, the devil will become troubled and become louder and attempt to ruin the peace.  These hardships should be endured and after they are recognized can be removed through obedience to a confessor or Christian counselor who will guide you away from them.

Mary Magdalene's prayer was full of repentance and love for Christ.  If you would like to take Christian Counseling Courses, then please review the program
Mary Magdalene’s prayer was full of repentance and love for Christ. If you would like to take Christian Counseling Courses, then please review the program
St. Teresa also emphasizes that our prayer life should seek no spiritual rewards or consolations or visions. Instead she emphasizes that we should prayer for the simple purpose of love.  Our Divine Majesty is owed this love without return of reward.  This is the best prayer.  One should embrace ardity in prayer to better show our Lord how deep our love is for him  Of course our Lord will not be out done in generousity.
 

I hope some of these ideas from Christ and his saints can aid Christian Counselors in their guidance of their spiritual children.  I will now add some insight from the words of experts on mystical prayer, namely the saints.
Souls that have no habit of prayer are like a lame and paralytic body, which, though it has hands and feet, cannot use them. Therefore, to abandon prayer seems to me the same thing as to lose the straight road; for as prayer is the gate through which all the graces of God come to us, when this is closed, I do not know how we can have any.—-St. Teresa
The soul that perseveres in the exercise of prayer, however many sins, temptations and falls of a thousand kinds the devil may oppose to it, may hold it for certain, after all, that the Lord will sooner or later rescue it from danger and guide it into the harbor of salvation.—-St. Teresa
Mental prayer consists in weighing and understanding what we are saying, Who it is to Whom we are speaking and who we are to have the courage to speak to so great a Lord. To have these and similar thoughts is properly to make mental prayer. Their opinion, however, is not to be followed who believe that its whole essence consists in thinking, so that if they can keep their thoughts fixed by a great effort, then they consider themselves very spiritual and men of prayer; but if they are able to do this no longer, and their attention wanders a little, even to good things, they imagine they are doing nothing. No, the substance of mental prayer, in my opinion, consists in nothing but conversing with God as with a friend. And so, to speak of this thing or of that to Him, Who, we know, loves us, is mental prayer.—-St. Teresa

Mental Prayer involves understanding what we are saying and reflecting on it
Mental Prayer involves understanding what we are saying and reflecting on it. If you would like to learn more then please review our Christian counseling courses
If, while one is praying, he regards and considers the fact that he is conversing with God with more attention than the words that he utters, he is making vocal and mental prayer at once, which may be of much advantage to him. But if he does not consider with Whom he is speaking, nor what he is saying, it may be thought certain that, however much he may move his lips, he prays very little.—-St. Teresa
When the soul finds herself oppressed by aridity and sterility, she ought to make the prayer of reverence, confidence, and conformity to the Divine Will, standing in the presence of God like a poor man before his prince, making use of such words as express a loving submission to the Divine pleasure.—-St. Jane Frances de Chantal
Whoever wishes to profit by prayers should not take account of spiritual consolations. I know by experience that the soul which has started on this road with a full determination not to consider whether the Lord gives or denies him consolations and tenderness, and really acts on this determination, has already made a great part of the journey.—-St. Teresa
There is another thing which greatly afflicts those who give themselves to prayer. It is the distractions which often come and carry their thoughts, and their hearts too, hither and thither. They come at times from the mortification of the senses; at times with the soul being distracted in itself, and often because the Lord wills it, to try His servants. Now in such cases we must recall our thoughts from time to time, by reviving our faith in the presence of God, and by remaining before Him with reverence and respect. If we do not succeed in fixing them on the prescribed point, we must bear those annoyances and vexations with humility and patience. It will not be lost time, as at first sight it may appear, but such a prayer will sometimes be more fruitful than many others made with recollection and pleasure. For all the actions performed to banish or to endure these distractions, as they are done in order not to displease God, and to become better qualified for His service, are so many acts of the love of God.—-St. Teresa
The whole aim of whoever intends to give himself to prayer ought to be to labor, to resolve, to dispose himself, with all possible diligence, to conform his will to that of God. For in this consists all the highest perfection that can be acquired in the spiritual way.—-St. Teresa
Try to disengage yourself from so many cares, and take a little time to think of God and to rest in Him. Enter into the secret chamber of your heart, and banish from it everything save your Creator alone and what can help you to find Him; then having closed the door, say to Him, with all your soul: “Lord, I seek Thy Divine countenance—-teach me to find it!”—-St. Augustine
St. Augustine
St. Augustine
In mental prayer, we are not obliged to employ our intellect all the time. We can occupy ourselves in the presence of God by conversing and consoling ourselves with Him, without the weariness of formal considerations and choice words. We can represent to Him simply our necessities, and the cause He has for showing us mercy. For example, when we think of some part of the Passion, it is a good thing to make a consideration first, by meditating on the pains which Our Lord suffered in it. But let not the soul weary itself by seeking too long for this; let it rather sometimes remain still with Christ, and keeping the intellect inactive if possible, let it occupy itself, in thought, in looking upon Him; let it accompany Him, ask favors of Him, humble itself and console itself with Him, and remember that He did not deserve to be there. This method of prayer has many advantages.—-St. Teresa
We should set a high value on meditation upon the Passion of our Redeemer. For a simple remembrance or meditation upon this is worth more than if for a whole year one should take the discipline to blood, or fast on bread and water every week, or recite the whole psalter every day.—-Bl. Albertus Magnus
There is a certain method of practicing the presence of God, by which, if the soul chooses, she may remain always in prayer, and constantly inflaming with the love of God. This consists in realizing, in the midst of our occupations, that we are doing the will of God in each, and in rejoicing and being glad that it is so.—-St. Alphonsus Rodriguez
The highest and most perfect prayer is contemplation. But this is altogether the work of God, as it is supernatural and above our powers. The soul can only prepare itself for this prayer, and can do nothing in it. The best preparation is to live humbly, and to give ourselves in earnest to the acquisition of virtues, and especially, of fraternal charity and the love of God; to have a find resolution to do the will of God in all things; to walk in the way of the Cross, and to destroy self-love, which is a wish, on our part, to please ourselves rather than God.—-St. Teresa

I hope these quotes give some insight in one’s spiritual life.
If you are interested in Christian Counseling Courses, please review the program.
Mark Moran, MA

Agnosticism and Christian Counseling

Christian Counseling and Agnosticism

Christian Counseling with an Agnostic can be a challenge because an Agnostic does not share the core faith as a Christian.  Agnosticism while not denying the existence of God, questions the existence and is skeptical of any truth and finds truth in a cafeteria of philosophies that suite him one day and un suit him the next day.

Agnosticism is pure confusion.   Also please review our Christian Counseling courses
Agnosticism is pure confusion. Also please review our Christian Counseling courses
When dealing with an Agnostic, one must understand the primary issue affecting him.  This issue lies in the sole issue of faith.  The Agnostic does not possess the theological virtue of faith.  He is subdued with doubt and second guessing and is constantly in search of stable ground.  His intellect or reason refuses to release the will to jump forward into the unknown.
When dealing with a lack of faith, one must attempt to build a logical ground work for the intellect to find some sense in the article being analyzed; Once the philosophy is understood, the intellect then can decide if the ideals presented or within credibility or not.  Ultimately, reason can only take one so far. One must assent to the grace of the Holy Spirit to receive the faith necessary to believe.  Why?  The answer is simple.  The simple finite mind cannot comprehend the majesty of God and only through the release of reason can the certainty of faith sweep within the soul.  Man cannot save himself and must release himself to God.
This is the paradox of the Agnostic.  He does not possess faith but also is afraid to accept faith.   The impediments to this may result from pride in reason or a sincere fear of the unknown.  As a Christian Counselor, it is important to identify what is preventing the Agnostic from embracing faith.  In Christian Counseling, various discussions can lead one to discover whether the Agnostic suffers from pride or fear.
Ultimately everyone’s choice lies in free will and if the intellect and will refuse to accept a logical argument then one will not be open to conversion.  Of course there have been cases, especially in the case of St. Paul, where the Lord manifests himself beyond any reasonable doubt, but for most, our Lord proclaims, “Blessed are those who have not seen, yet still believe”.
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