Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Blog on Addiction

Substance abuse is not always a choice.  While the initial taste or inhalation or snort or injection of a drug is a bad choice, the addiction is something far more sinister.  Addiction later captures the individual and the choice to escape is no longer present.  Instead the individual faces strong urges that control their mind and body.  Substance Abuse Counseling can help individuals face addiction better as well.

There are many reasons why people might choose to use drugs and become addicted. Some people might use drugs to escape from reality or to cope with difficult life circumstances. Others might use drugs because they’re curious about them or because their friends are using them. Some people might even use drugs for medicinal purposes. Whatever the reason, drug use is a complex issue with many contributing factors.  Ultimately, the drug leads to a state of addiction for millions of Americans.

Poor choices and bad coping can lead to addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

Addiction is a state characterized by compulsive engagement in rewarding stimuli, despite adverse consequences. Despite the involvement of a number of psychosocial factors, a biological process – one which is induced by repeated exposure to an addictive stimulus – is the core pathology that drives the development and maintenance of an addiction.  The traditional view of addiction, as a strictly behavioral phenomenon, has been challenged by more recent research which highlights the role of neurochemical changes in the brain in mediating addictive behavior.

The brain and addiction are intimately linked. Addiction hijacks the brain’s natural reward systems, causing powerful cravings and reinforcing the behaviors that lead to addiction. Over time, this can lead to changes in the brain that make it even harder to break free from addiction. But it’s not all doom and gloom – there is hope. With treatment and support, people can recover from addiction and go on to lead healthy, productive lives.

Addiction is a complex disease that affects the brain and body. It is a chronic, relapsing disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences. Overcoming addiction is a difficult and long process that requires professional help, support from family and friends, and often takes many tries. However, it is possible to overcome addiction with hard work and determination.  There are a few key things to keep in mind when recovering from addiction. First, it is important to understand that addiction is a disease. Just like any other disease, it takes time, effort, and patience to recover. Second, it is important to seek professional help. Substance Abuse Counselors can help you develop a plan for recovery and provide support along the way.

When an individual is struggling with addiction, they are often fighting a battle on multiple fronts. Not only are they dealing with the physical cravings and withdrawal symptoms that come with addiction, but they are also often battling mental health issues, social stigma, and financial instability. Coping with addiction can be incredibly difficult, but there are a few key things that individuals can do to help themselves.   Addiction Counselors can play a large role in recovery.

Addiction counselors are mental health professionals who work with individuals struggling with substance abuse and addiction. They provide support and guidance to help people overcome their challenges and live healthy, drug-free lives. Addiction counselors use a variety of techniques to help their clients, including individual and group counseling, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and 12-step programs.

Addiction Counselors and support groups can help with substance abuse. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program

 

Cognitive therapy is a type of psychological therapy that helps people to change the way they think and feel about different situations. It is based on the idea that our thoughts, feelings and behaviors are all interconnected, and that by changing our thoughts, we can change our feelings and behaviors.  Cognitive therapy has been shown to be effective in treating a range of mental health problems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders and substance abuse.

The 12-step program is a set of guidelines for recovering from addiction, originally developed by Alcoholics Anonymous. The program has since been adapted for use with other types of addiction, such as narcotics, gambling, and food.  The 12 step program is a set of guidelines for recovery from addiction. The program is based on the belief that addiction is a disease that can be treated by following certain steps. The steps involve admitting that you have a problem, admitting that you cannot control your addiction, and making a commitment to change your behavior. Other steps include finding a support group, learning new coping skills, and making amends for past mistakes.

There is a growing body of research that suggests that family involvement can also be helpful for people who are struggling with addiction. This may include providing support and understanding, helping with treatment and recovery, and making changes in the home environment to reduce stressors and triggers. While each situation is unique, involvement from family members can make a significant difference in the outcome of treatment.

An individual who receives help through the process of recovering from a substance must continue after treatment.  It is a life long cross that one must carry.  Relapse is an unfortunate result for many individuals facing addiction.  Relapse is defined as a return to drug use after a period of abstinence, and it can occur even after years of being clean. The risk of relapse is highest in the first few months after quitting, but it can happen at any time.

Many times individuals return to the source of their addiction because they feel alone, rejected, or seek to escape reality.  One must understand that the fight against addiction is a permanent war that will rage the entire person’s life.  This is why during recovery and well beyond it is important that individuals keep good company and avoid occasions that lead to the use of a particular substance or push for its usage.

Addiction is a horrible disease and stigma for many.  If individuals understand the nature of it and see the life that is being destroyed by it then they can better face it and find the help they need. Many understand this but find it difficult.  This is why the first step is so critical and important to be supported and encouraged.  When one starts to realize they have a problem and look to take accountability, then a ray of hope enters into that person’s life

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling Training.

Additional Resources

What Is Addiction? from Healthline

The 12 Steps & 12 Step Programs: Everything You Need to Know” reviewed by Susan Stader

Substance Abuse” by Roxanne Dryden-Edwards, MD

Overcoming Addiction” by Marc Galanter in Psychology Today

Does Adult ADHD Lead to Alcoholism or Drug Use? 

Written by Fay Smith

ADHD is a common diagnosis for kids who struggle in school, but what happens when kids grow up and struggle in their offices, communities, and relationships?

Adults with ADHD have difficult challenges, and many turn to drugs and alcohol to cope.

In this article, we’ll look at how and why that is.

How Adults Cope with ADHD

ADHD presents many challenges for adults, but one of the biggest is regularly lacking dopamine.

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is largely responsible for the pleasure that you feel when you accomplish something. A sense of accomplishment boosts you and makes it easier to take on your next tasks. For people with ADHD, this doesn’t happen the same way.

Adults with ADHD have a different reward system than neurotypical adults. A normal work routine, including meetings, might be somewhat boring for an office manager who is neurotypical, but it could send someone with ADHD into a spiral.

Without feeling like they are accomplishing anything important to them, and receiving the dopamine boost that goes along with that, it becomes increasingly hard to concentrate.

Having ADHD and needing to do things you don’t want to do and aren’t interested in can be extremely difficult, and even painful.

It’s a process of trying to force your brain to act in ways it doesn’t want to. The result is usually a drop in neurotransmitters and the onset of depression. Up to 53% of people with ADHD also struggle with depression.

There are legal substances that can provide a lot of help to adults with ADHD. Coffee can help to stimulate the brain to produce more neurotransmitters, and legal CBD can help to relax the nervous system and provide the restful sleep that adults with ADHD need to maintain good brain health. Know more about it here.

However, there are many adults with ADHD who turn to alcohol and drugs – not just to cope with the pain of having ADHD as an adult in a world designed for neurotypical people, but to help manage an unruly brain that won’t seem to follow directions.

Why do ADHD Adults Turn to Drugs and Alcohol?

It’s important to note that every adult with ADHD was once a child with ADHD, and it is typically in pre-adolescence or adolescence when substance abuse problems or tendencies first arise.

An 8-year longitudinal study found that at the age of 14.9, 40% of ADHD subjects and only 22% of control subjects had used alcohol (Barkley et al. 1990). This suggests that alcohol and other drugs are more appealing to people with ADHD in early adolescence.

A different study found that at age 25, alcohol use was roughly equal between ADHD adults and control groups, but we know that early and intense alcohol use is a risk factor for later alcohol and drug problems.

Growing up is when most people start to face increasing demands on their time and attention, which is also when young adults with ADHD begin to face significant struggles and shoulder the shame that comes from not being able to act or be like everyone else.

ADHD adults use drugs to cope, practically and emotionally.

In a practical sense, drugs and alcohol change the brain and produce the mental states that people with ADHD are looking for. When you are unable to feel happy or concentrate, a cup of coffee can help. So can other drugs. When you can’t seem to calm down or regulate your energy or emotions, alcohol can help. So can other drugs.

Neurotypical adults might be able to take a deep breath and restore calm and focus, but this just doesn’t happen for ADHD adults, who struggle to regulate themselves.

On an emotional level, it is easy to blame yourself for your problems as someone with ADHD. An inability to focus can be mistaken as a lack of interest or care. Disinterest in boring and unrewarding tasks can come across as laziness.

Adults with ADHD have to deal with a disabling inability to focus, as well as being blamed personally for that inability to focus.

In a culture that values constant productivity and readiness, adults with ADHD often struggle to regulate their attention and emotions and use drugs or alcohol as tools to cope.

Recovery for Adults with ADHD and Drug Problems

Although alcohol and other drugs might relieve temporary symptoms of ADHD, they invariably make life worse.

This is not just for all of the reasons that you’re familiar with – the cost, the health impacts, the social impacts, etc – but also because alcohol and most other drugs are harmful to the brain and end up making symptoms worse in the long run.

A healthy brain releases more neurotransmitters that help focus and attention. An unhealthy brain doesn’t regulate itself well. When you start messing with your brain’s reward system, it makes it even harder to set things right.

If you or someone you know is an adult with ADHD and a drug or alcohol problem, find a treatment solution that also addresses the impacts of ADHD. True recovery requires solutions to multiple problems.

 

 


Author Bio: Fay Smith

Fay Smith worked in communications for five years before settling down with her husband. She’s now a mother of two young children and takes care of three lovable Pomeranians. Fay Smith is a regular contributor on various health and wellness sites. She also works as a freelance writer and researcher on wellness topics, such as alternative treatments and CBD.

 

 

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Attention Deficit Consulting certificate program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program in online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

Addictions Signs of Substance Abuse

Many family members do not notice the signs of addiction.  It is important to identify these signs so that one can properly help before it becomes too late.  Addiction is a disease but it is something that can be controlled through proper intervention and coping methods.  Substance Abuse Counselors can help others through the issues of addiction and help them find ways to better cope through the difficulties addiction can produce.

Knowing the signs in one’s children or in friends and family can be key in stopping addiction from becoming far worst.  It can help lead one to the help one needs.  Being diligent and alert in what friends and family are doing and noticing changes in life style can be the key in saving a friend or family member, or even own child.

There are numerous behavioral signs of addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “The Warning Signs of Addiction and How To Help” from Avera’s Behavioral Health Team takes a closer look at signs of addiction.  The article emphasizes the critical importance of noticing addiction signs and what to particularly look out for.  Possible signs of hiding substances, irritability, or behavioral changes are all listed.  Ultimately, helping the person find help is the key. The article states,

“Addiction is among the most difficult diseases to treat. Part of the reason for this is because in 60 to 80% of cases, mental health conditions are intertwined with the abuse of alcohol or drugs “When a loved one is struggling with addiction, it’s likely they’re also facing a mental health condition,” said Malia Holbeck, LCSW-PIP, outpatient manager with Avera’s Addiction Recovery Program. Holbeck said that’s why professional support is recommended to treat the person. Going it alone – without a pro backing your efforts – can lead to failure.”

“The Warning Signs of Addiction and How To Help”. Behavioral Health Team. July 26th, 2022. Avera

To read the entire article, please click here

Commentary

Substance abuse is a major problem in our society. It leads to crime, violence, and other problems. Substance abuse is also a major health problem. It can lead to addiction, disease, and death. We need to do something about this problem.

Signs of Addiction

The signs of addiction can be divided into three categories: physical, psychological, and behavioral. Physical signs include tolerance (needing more of the substance to get the same effect), withdrawal (experiencing negative symptoms when not using the substance), and cravings (intense desires to use the substance). Psychological signs include preoccupation with using the substance, loss of control over one’s use of the substance, and continued use despite negative consequences.

The signs of addiction for family and friends may include changes in behavior, mood, and physical appearance. Family and friends may also notice a change in the person’s social life, work life, and hobbies. The person may become more isolated and withdrawn, and their relationships may suffer. They may also begin to neglect their personal hygiene and appearance.  There may also be financial problems and difficulty keeping up with work or school.   Also, if a friend or family member has experienced a loss or experienced a tragedy, if over time, they do not seem to resume normal activities, one may need to check on their progress and check and see if they are using drugs or other substances. If you are concerned about someone you love, it is important to talk to them about your concerns and get help from a professional if needed.  If you notice any of these changes in a loved one, it may be time to seek help.

There are many signs that a teen may be addicted to drugs or alcohol. These include changes in mood or behavior, withdrawal from friends and activities, secrecy, lying, and financial problems. Teens may also have difficulty concentrating, sleeping, or eating. They may also become more withdrawn, irritable, or aggressive. If you suspect your teen may be addicted to drugs or alcohol, it is important to get help right away.

Preventing Substance Abuse in Teens and Family

The best way to prevent substance abuse in teens is through a family-based approach. This means that parents need to be involved in their child’s life and be aware of what they are doing. They also need to provide support and guidance to their child so that they can make good decisions. Additionally, families need to be able to communicate openly about difficult topics like substance abuse.

Parents who take the time to care will find any negative signs.  It is when parents do not look for the signs because they become to busy in their own life that bad things such as substance abuse and addiction occur.  By caring, many bad things can be prevented.

Conclusion

By taking time to care for friends, teens and family, individuals can easily spot the signs of addiction.  It is when individuals become to enveloped in their lives that simple signs are missed.  It is important to be aware and see the glaring physical, behavioral, or events that occur in another in order to process a bad change taking place.  It is not a difficult thing but only a thing that requires attentiveness and priorities for the overall health of others.

If the signs listed above manifest, talk to the individual and if necessary, guide them to substance abuse counselors or appropriate healthcare and mental healthcare professionals.

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling Certification.  After completion of the required courses in substance abuse, professionals can then earn the four year certification.

Additional Resources

“Recognizing Signs of Prescription Drug Abuse and Addiction, Part I”. Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D.  Medsurg Nursing; Pitman Vol. 23, Iss. 6,  (Nov/Dec 2014): 391-396. Access here

“Symptoms of Addiction”. Elizabeth Hartney, BSc, MSc, MA, PhD. April 30th, 2022. Verywellmind. Access here

“Signs of Drug Addiction”. Paula Spencer Scott. January 27th, 2021. WebMD. Access here

“Signs of Addiction”. FHE Health. Access here

The Nature of Addiction and Substance Abuse

Addiction can be social but in most cases it is genetic.  Addition in the brain compels an individual to become physically dependent upon the substance.  This is by far a stronger addiction than social and peer influences.  The individual actually becomes addicted in the brain to the new substance.  It is hard to say who or who will not become addicted to a particular drug, based on the chemical makeup of the drug itself and also the genetic makeup of the individual.  This is why it is critical to avoid addicting substances.  Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Practitioner Program if you wish to help others face addiction.

The process of addiction starts in the brain. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Practitioner Program and see if it meets your professional goals

 

The article, “The Science of Drug Use: How Substance Use Can Lead to Addiction” by Simbiat Bakare looks closer at the process of addiction within the brain and its neuro transmitters.  He states,

“Substances like marijuana, heroin, amphetamine, and cocaine tap into the brain system, causing the neurons to release large amounts of natural neurotransmitters which are chemical brain messengers that amplify a user’s craving for hard drugs. With drug users indulging their cravings, the brain adapts to the surge in dopamine and other neurotransmitters by reducing the number of receptors, thus making the user take a higher dosage of drugs to get the desired euphoria.”

“The Science of Drug Use: How Substance Use Can Lead to Addiction”. Simbiat Bakare. June 15th, 2022. NET.

To read the entire article, please click here

Commentary

Addiction is a state of compulsive engagement in rewarding stimuli, despite adverse consequences. It is a brain disorder characterized by compulsive engagement in activities that are intrinsically rewarding (e.g., eating, sex, gambling) and/or by compulsive engagement in activities that are extrinsically rewarding (e.g., working, caring for others). The former group of activities is typically referred to as natural rewards, while the latter group is typically referred to as conditioned rewards.  Addiction is a complex condition that is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking behavior and continued use despite harmful consequences. Addiction is caused by a variety of factors, including genetic predisposition, social environment, and psychological factors.  The initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, but repeated drug use can lead to brain changes that challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs.

Substance Abuse

Substance abuse is a term used to describe the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs. The term encompasses a range of activities, from binge drinking and occasional drug use to addiction and dependence. Substance abuse is a serious public health problem. It is estimated that one in four adults in the United States has engaged in some form of substance abuse at some point in their lives.

Substance abuse is the overindulgence in or dependence on a psychoactive substance, especially alcohol or drugs. Though often associated with illegal drugs, alcohol and prescription medication can be just as addictive and damaging. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences. Drugs change the brain in ways that make quitting hard, even for those who want to.

Addiction and the Brain

The brain’s job is to constantly receive information from the body and decide what to do with it. The brain also has to keep track of what is going on around us in our environment.
Addiction occurs when drugs or alcohol change the way the brain works.  There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that addiction is, at least in part, a brain disease. This is because addiction appears to change the structure and function of the brain, which then leads to changes in behavior. These changes in the brain can be long-lasting and can lead to the harmful behaviors seen in people with addiction.

The behaviors that stem from brain issues due to addiction cause an individual to feel a sense of compulsion or obsession with a particular activity. These behaviors can be harmful to the individual’s health and well-being, but they may continue to engage in them despite the negative consequences. There are many different types of addictive behaviors, but some common ones include substance abuse, gambling, sex, and shopping.

Conclusion

In conclusion, addiction is a serious problem that affects millions of people worldwide. It is a complex disease that changes the brain in ways that make it difficult for people to control their impulses and make healthy choices. While there is no easy solution, treatment can help people recover from addiction and lead fulfilling lives.

Addiction and recovery are difficult topics to discuss. There is no one-size-fits-all solution to addiction, and recovery is a lifelong process. However, there is hope for those struggling with addiction, and many resources available to help them on their journey to recovery. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please reach out for help.

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Practitioner Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.   Those who become certified can offer aid to those affected by addiction.  Many certified members work in lower tier positions under the guidance of a licensed professional at addiction clinics or addiction services.  Licensed social workers and licensed counselors benefit from earning a certification to enhance their resume and practice in helping others deal with the dangers of addiction.

 

Additional Resources

“Neurocircuitry of Addiction”.George F Koob & Nora D Volkow. Neuropsychopharmacology volume 35pages217–238 (2010).  Access here

“What is addiction?”. Harvard Health Blog.  September 12th, 2021. Harvard Health Publishing. Access here

“What is addiction?”. Alyssa Peckham. June 3rd, 2021. MedicalNewsToday.  Access here

“What Is Addiction?”. Psychology Today Staff. Psychology Today. Access here

“What causes addiction?”. Adam Felman.  November 2nd, 2018. MedicalNewsToday. Access here

“Biology of Addiction”. October 2015. News In Health.  Access here

Substance Abuse Counseling Blog on the Nature of Addiction

The science of addiction looks at how one goes from non use to habit to addiction.   Addiction can be in many forms to multiple things from drugs and substances to even actions and various activities.   It is important to never let one thing dominate one’s life and to always remain balanced and moderate in all actions.

The nature of addiction has multiple causes for different people. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “Why do we become addicted to things? Recognizing the top 10 most common addictions” by Dawn Jorgenson looks at the tops types of addiction and the addiction process.  She states,

“As many people can probably guess, most of us aren’t born with an addiction, so how do people become addicted to something, anyway?  The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says it happens gradually, but it always begins with experimentation. Experts say that when broken down, addiction is a mental disorder — a compulsive engagement with something that makes a person feel rewarded or happy, despite the fact that the experience can bring unfavorable consequences.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

Substance Abuse Counseling Program Blog on Addiction Recovery

Substance abuse and addiction did not happen over night and they cannot be reversed overnight.  It is important to understand a few key concepts surrounding addiction recovery if one wishes to help someone who is facing addiction.

Substance abuse recovery is a long process. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program

 

The article, “7 Things You Need to Know about Addiction and Recovery” from Medical News Bulletin looks at 7 things that one must understand regarding the nature of addiction. The article states,

“Addiction doesn’t signify weakness, moral failure, or character flaw. It’s a chronic illness that affects brain function and structure. It exerts a strong influence on your brain and can manifest as a craving for the substance you’re addicted to, loss of control over its use, and inability to stop taking it despite the problems it causes you. Substance abuse, if not treated, can lead to severe emotional, social, and physical concerns.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Consulting Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on the Nature of Addiction

Addiction is a disease that can affect a person’s behavior and also cause physical problems.  How to identify addictive behaviors and addiction itself is important in living a healthy life.  Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program to learn more about addiction and how it affects individuals.

 

Addiction can steal one’s life
Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your professional and academic goals and needs

 

The article, “Signs of Addiction Denial” by Geralyn Drexter reviews the nature of addiction and the issues that go with it.  She states,

“Addiction is a brain disease characterized by compulsive behaviors that continue despite harmful or negative consequences.1 Usually, people envision drug or alcohol use when they think about addiction. However, addiction can include a variety of behaviors, including substance use, gambling, and sexual fantasies, urges, and actions.  People living with addictions may deny their behavior. This article explores the signs of addiction denial and when to seek help.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please again also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Types of Addiction

Addiction is something that is more than just chemical but it can also be behavioral.  It is an urge inside that pushes one to do certain things that are not beneficial in excess.  It distorts something and turns it into something negative for one’s life.   Addiction can come in forms of drugs to certain behaviors.

Addiction can trap one in many different ways. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “Understanding the Different Types of Addiction, From Chemical to Behavioral” by Sara Lindberg takes a closer look how addiction works.  She states,

“Addiction can take shape in two ways: overusing or misusing substances or excessively engaging in behaviors despite the negative consequences either results in. These two types of addiction are typically recognized as chemical or behavioral.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Addiction can be difficult to overcome.  Sometimes it takes counseling and in other cases, it takes drastic measures to remove oneself from a certain type of drug, crowd or activity.

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals looking for a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Program on Women and Addiction

Addiction afflicts millions of Americans.  Addiction can be substance or habit but it ultimately leads to a behavior that no longer leaves the person in control but in need of in order to properly function.   Addiction affects any age and any gender without bias.  Women however are affected by addiction in different ways.  It is important to understand gender differences in addiction in Substance Abuse Counseling.

Women are affected by addiction and experience and react to it differently then men. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “Why Women Experience Addiction Differently” by Devon Frye looks at how addiction affects women differently and why.  She states,

“Research and anecdotal evidence have identified at least three paths to addiction that may be more prevalent among women than men. The first and most troubling involves past or ongoing trauma.  In the treatment center where I work, we find that around 75 percent of our women patients have had at least one traumatic event in the past that may be contributing to their addiction. Among men, both at our center and nationally, the incidence of trauma is also high, but it looks to be more like 50 percent.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Discussing Addiction with Teens

With peer pressure and fast developing minds, kids and teens can make poor choices.  Even the best raised teen with faith and family can give in to the temptation from time to time.  How parents teach their children about drugs and addiction varies but it is nevertheless an important conversation.

It is important to teach teens about the dangers of addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “How to talk about alcohol and drugs with kids of all ages” by Elissa Strauss looks at how parents can help their children be better prepared to deal with drugs and alcohol.  The article states,

“The adolescent brain is in this process of developing and becoming, and it is not finished cooking until young people are in their early or mid-20s. Adolescents aren’t wired for addiction, but they are wired to take risks. Their baseline levels of dopamine (a type of neurotransmitter associated with pleasure) are lower than they are for children or for grown-ups. Drugs and alcohol became a route to novelty and risk — to feel something.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Risk and dangerous choices can manifest into drugs, which later lead to addiction.

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.