Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Program on Women and Addiction

Addiction afflicts millions of Americans.  Addiction can be substance or habit but it ultimately leads to a behavior that no longer leaves the person in control but in need of in order to properly function.   Addiction affects any age and any gender without bias.  Women however are affected by addiction in different ways.  It is important to understand gender differences in addiction in Substance Abuse Counseling.

Women are affected by addiction and experience and react to it differently then men. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “Why Women Experience Addiction Differently” by Devon Frye looks at how addiction affects women differently and why.  She states,

“Research and anecdotal evidence have identified at least three paths to addiction that may be more prevalent among women than men. The first and most troubling involves past or ongoing trauma.  In the treatment center where I work, we find that around 75 percent of our women patients have had at least one traumatic event in the past that may be contributing to their addiction. Among men, both at our center and nationally, the incidence of trauma is also high, but it looks to be more like 50 percent.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Discussing Addiction with Teens

With peer pressure and fast developing minds, kids and teens can make poor choices.  Even the best raised teen with faith and family can give in to the temptation from time to time.  How parents teach their children about drugs and addiction varies but it is nevertheless an important conversation.

It is important to teach teens about the dangers of addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

 

The article, “How to talk about alcohol and drugs with kids of all ages” by Elissa Strauss looks at how parents can help their children be better prepared to deal with drugs and alcohol.  The article states,

“The adolescent brain is in this process of developing and becoming, and it is not finished cooking until young people are in their early or mid-20s. Adolescents aren’t wired for addiction, but they are wired to take risks. Their baseline levels of dopamine (a type of neurotransmitter associated with pleasure) are lower than they are for children or for grown-ups. Drugs and alcohol became a route to novelty and risk — to feel something.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Risk and dangerous choices can manifest into drugs, which later lead to addiction.

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Characteristics of Addiction

Addiction is a serious issue in society.  Addiction tears apart families and destroys relationships.  Knowing that one is addicted is the first step to recovery.

It is usually very self apparent if one is addicted, but there are questions and measurements to evaluate if one is addicted.  Substance Abuse Counselors can go through a series of questions to determine if someone is addicted.

There are many questions to determine an addiction problem. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Program

 

The article, “How Addiction Is Diagnosed” by Chrystine Wagner takes a closer look at addiction and what the dictates if one is addicted.  She states,

“Since addiction is often a self-diagnosed condition, recognizing or deciding you may be struggling with an addiction is often one of the biggest challenges in recovery. Everyone who has an addiction comes to that recognition in different ways.  Questions to ask yourself if you think you may have an addiction include…”

To read the entire article, please click here

The most common elements are over indulgence and the inability to stop.  Other factors to consider include loss of time for other things, broken relationships, loss wages and jobs, and excessive time and spending on the habit.

To learn more about addiction, please review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Program Article on Addiction Treatments

Addiction treatment plans differ and vary depending on the severity and type of addictions.  For most substances, licensed counselors or professional therapists will prescribe certain medications, as well as supply certain behavioral therapies.  Substance Abuse Counselors can play a role in guiding others at a lower level with basic guidance and encouragement and direction.

Addiction treatments vary upon a multitude of factors. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program

 

The article, “How Addiction Is TreatedA” by Ruth Edwards supplies an indepth look at a variety of treatment responses to a multitude of different drugs.  She states,

“Addiction is a complex chronic brain condition that is characterized by substance abuse or repetitive engagement in preblematic behaviors, such as gambling, which then continues despite causing harm to yourself or others.1 It involves interactions between the brain, genes, and environmental factors.  Common treatment approaches include behavioral therapies and medications. Different treatment options are recommended depending on the specific addiction, and in many cases, a combination of approaches is advised.”

The article then covers a myriad of different substances and recommended treatment plans.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a certification in Substance Abuse Counseling Training.

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Addiction and Self Isolation

Addiction is a powerful thing even during normal times.  Isolation and quarantine can make addiction even harder.  Lack of social support, counseling and being around other people can make one turn towards addicting things.  Instead of connection, the person returns to addiction.

Self isolation is very difficult when dealing with addiction. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program to learn how to become certified

 

The article, “Managing Addiction Recovery During Self-Isolation” from Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials takes a closer look how one can manage addiction during self-isolation.  The article states,

Managing addiction recovery can be difficult at any time but the recent coronavirus pandemic has made doing so even harder. Besides affecting in-person meetings and appointments, current quarantine rules have also put extra strain on those struggling with recovery. But that doesn’t mean any efforts are hopeless. Understanding what triggers can add stress to your situation can make dealing with current circumstances easier. And it’s also important to know how many ways you can still receive the support you need.

To read the entire article, please click here

Identifying triggers is a key part of managing oneself during self isolation.  Being able to ward off the feelings of need is also key.  This is easier said then done but the article above hopes to give a few ways to make it less difficult.  If you would like to become certified in Substance Abuse Counseling and would like to help others, please review AIHCP’s program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Substance Abuse Counseling Article on Addiction and Career

A big issue is the lost work hours due to addiction.  Many individuals miss work or lose their job due to addiction and drugs.  Those who do make it to work end up lagging or lowering productivity.   Some may even harm themselves because of the increase of accident.

Addiction and substance abuse can creep into every aspect of one’s life, career included. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling training program

 

These issues can create a dangerous or less productive work environment.  Employers deal with employees who miss work or arrive late on a consistent basis nationwide.  This leads to financial damage to both parties.   It is imperative to prevent addiction from harming one’s job or career.  Some employers offer addiction counseling services.  Others have to seek help on their own.

Others may function with addiction.  This in no way means that the addiction is not destroying the qualify of life.  High functioning addicts are damaging themselves long term even if the short term damage is not as present.

The article, “The Relationship Between Addiction and Job Problems”from Addiction Center states,

“A person suffering from a substance use disorder is not only affecting their own lives, they are impacting their family, friends, co-workers, and managers. If your drug or alcohol use is affecting your job negatively in any way and you continue to use, you may be suffering from a serious addiction”

To read the entire article, please click here

Addiction is a serious issue not only to job and career, but also to family, social life and health.  If addiction is destroying one’s career and job, it is critical to re-assess one’s life and find the help one needs.  Substance Abuse Counselors may be licensed professional counselors or merely trained in the area of substance abuse.  They can offer guidance and help.  If one is interested in becoming certified in Substance Abuse Counseling, then please review the program and see if it matches one’s professional and academic goals.

Assisting Your Patients in Overcoming Heroin Addiction

Written by Lizzie Weakley, a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio.

 

With the unprecedented rise of opium addiction, you are probably seeing more patients with serious addiction issues who need medical help. Some are living basically functional lives, but their drug use is threatening to get out of control. Other users are hooked on heroin and have become unable to care for themselves, possibly facing overdose or death if they cannot stop using this destructive drug. The following strategies may be able to help heroin-addicted patients.

Cognitive Therapy

People who are addicted to a strong substance like heroin often benefit from cognitive therapy, or professional counseling. This approach assists patients in addressing core issues that may be causes or triggers for the addiction, such as a troubled childhood, mental health problems, or contributory circumstances like finances or dysfunctional relationships. Dealing with root causes can often help an addict to bring heroin use under control.

Detox Heroin Treatment

Heroin is both physically and mentally addictive. Used consistently, it disrupts normal life and puts someone on the path to destruction. Many addiction specialists recommend detox heroin treatment to completely clear the drug from both the body and the mind, and enable the person to regain normal function of both. There are both in-house and outpatient options, depending on the level of addiction the patient is struggling with, as well as lifestyle responsibilities like a job and family. Completing a detox heroin treatment program is often the first step toward a successful recovery.

Community Support Group

Heroin addiction recovery can also be reinforced by joining a community support group. The group is typically led by a professional therapist or a successfully recovered person with some level of education or training. Group members help each other by providing accountability, sharing encouragement, and reinforcing a recovery lifestyle. Support groups meet at different times, sometimes daily or weekly. Consistent attendance has been shown to be an effective tool in achieving and maintaining recovery. You can have information for support groups in your office, facilitate the meeting places for such places, or run them, if you have the required training.

Medical Referral

Some addicts are dealing with a number of physical or mental ailments, which may be contributing to the heroin addiction. If you are a general practitioner, you may need to refer your patient to a specialist who can treat the auxiliary problems that are debilitating the patient, along with facilitating heroin addiction recovery. Keeping pamphlets around the office and having the information on hand for patients who talk to you about their addiction is a good place to start.

Although heroin addiction is highly destructive, it can be effectively treated. Give your patients the tools they need to be able to treat their addiction at the root level in order for recovery to be successful. Teaming up with other doctors, therapists, and health care providers in your area can enable you to help patients who suffer from addiction, even if such treatment is outside of your expertise. Just by giving patients the information they need, by incorporating some of the above methods, or even just facilitating them, you can help save the lives of those under your care.

 

 

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Practitioner Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program in online and independent study and open to qualified professionals.

Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program Article on Role of Addiction Counselors

The role of an addiction counselor is critical in helping individuals overcome addictive impulses as well as substance abuse. Helping individuals overcome this can be achieved through licensed counselors with degrees in counseling, or also through educated professionals, some licensed, others not, who are certified in substance abuse counseling.   Substance Abuse Counseling itself does not require a license, but numerous professionals in the counseling field add such certifications to their background

Some individuals need professional help to defeat addiction. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program

The article,  “The Role of the Counselor in Addiction Recovery” from Wake Forest University looks at the role of an Addiction Counselor.  The article states,

“Substance abuse counselors provide a necessary support system for individuals recovering from eating disorders, drug and alcohol issues, gambling addictions, and other behavioral issues. By forming a relationship built on trust with their patients, counselors provide the support, resources, and judgement-free guidance that patients can utilize on their road to addiction recovery.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review the Substance Abuse Counseling Training program at AIHCP which helps professional earn a certification in this field.

Substance Abuse Counseling Program Article on Stigma and Recovery

One of a big issues in recovery for substance abusers is the stimga.  The stigma of being a previous user of whatever drug produces an image of someone undesirable.  Whether in the workforce or among social gatherings, this stigma can make it difficult for addicted to recover.  It is important to help substance abusers to have a healthy self esteem with their recovery

Recovery can be associated with a negative connotation.  Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program
Recovery can be associated with a negative connotation. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program

The article, “Reducing Stigma Key in Substance Abuse Recovery” by Jennifer Bryant states,

“Addiction is a mental disorder. We are working very hard to reduce the stigma and change the thinking that this is a moral failing”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program to learn more about helping others recover from Substance Abuse.

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Women and Drinking

More women are drinking and less women are getting the help they need for substance abuse.  Women sometimes are not seen as alcoholics but the reality is they are facing the same issues as men and the numbers are growing.

Women and drinking health issues are on the rise but the help is not there like it is for men. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program
Women and drinking health issues are on the rise but the help is not there like it is for men. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program

The article, “Women are Drinking More, but Get Less Help for Alcohol Abuse” states,

However, a recent study found that most people, especially women, with cirrhosis are not receiving substance abuse treatment to help them recover from alcoholism — even if their insurance plan offers coverage for addiction disorders.

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it matches your academic and professional needs.  With a certification in Substance Abuse Counseling, you can help others overcome their addiction.