Hypnotherapy Program Article on Smoking and Hypnosis

Hypnosis can help the subconscious mind find inner healing for the body.  It can re channel brain pathways to help the brain suppress bad behaviors.  It can help the intuitive right side of the brain find peace and affect the left side of the brain to make better decisions. It is through this rewiring and the plasticity of the brain that the body can eliminate bad habits.  One example is smoking.

Hypnosis can help the brain rewire itself against smoking addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Hypnotherapy Program

 

The article, “Can Hypnosis Get Me to Quit Smoking?” from Healthline looks at what hypnosis is and how it can better retrain the mind and brain to deal with bad habits.  The article states,

“It’s no wonder why so many people want to quit smoking. A 2019 research review Trusted Source showed that it’s the top cause of preventable illness and death in the world. Stopping can improve your health, but for many people, quitting is a huge challenge. There are many methods and products for quitting smoking. One that gets a fair amount of attention is hypnosis. Some people credit hypnosis with helping them quit”

To read the entire article, please click here

Addiction and bad habits can be difficult to beat.  Using hypnosis and imagery in a meditative stance can help one find solutions and new ways of processing cravings and reactions to those cravings.  Hypnosis helps one find that state.

Please also review AIHCP’s Hypnotherapy Program as well as AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Programs.  The programs are online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking four year certifications in Hypnotherapy or Addiction Counseling Training.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Program Article on Addiction Treatments

Addiction treatment plans differ and vary depending on the severity and type of addictions.  For most substances, licensed counselors or professional therapists will prescribe certain medications, as well as supply certain behavioral therapies.  Substance Abuse Counselors can play a role in guiding others at a lower level with basic guidance and encouragement and direction.

Addiction treatments vary upon a multitude of factors. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program

 

The article, “How Addiction Is TreatedA” by Ruth Edwards supplies an indepth look at a variety of treatment responses to a multitude of different drugs.  She states,

“Addiction is a complex chronic brain condition that is characterized by substance abuse or repetitive engagement in preblematic behaviors, such as gambling, which then continues despite causing harm to yourself or others.1 It involves interactions between the brain, genes, and environmental factors.  Common treatment approaches include behavioral therapies and medications. Different treatment options are recommended depending on the specific addiction, and in many cases, a combination of approaches is advised.”

The article then covers a myriad of different substances and recommended treatment plans.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a certification in Substance Abuse Counseling Training.

Substance Abuse Counseling Article on Pandemic and Opioid Abuse

Losing sight of the opioid problem in the United States would be a great error considering the damage it causes to homes.  The pandemic has taken much attention away from other issues, but as it continues and others are forced into isolation, substance abuse continues to rise even at a faster rate.

Opioid abuse continues to be a growing concern and issue during the pandemic. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training

 

Thea article, “4 Reasons Why the Opioid Crisis Still Needs Our Attention” by Phil Walls looks at the problem and why society still needs to remain vigilant regarding opioid abuse.  He states,

“There’s some evidence that issues related to the pandemic environment, including treatment delays and increased social isolation, may be contributing to an uptick in misuse. But there are other developments in the health care, pharmaceutical and workers’ compensation industries affecting both opioid usage and the parties responsible for paying for it.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program and see if it meets and matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and independent study and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

A certification in Substance Abuse Counseling does not necessarily require a license in counseling especially if someone is working at a center under professional guidance or is utilizing it as a pastor and minister.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Program Article on Addiction and Family

Addiction can tear families apart.  It can lead to broken homes, abuse and theft.  How to approach a loved one who is addicted is a tough situation.  In some cases, the person may be a spouse, parent, sibling, or teen.  This greatly affects the dynamics of the relationship.  However, it is important to deal with the situation.

Helping family through addiction can be difficult. It can also be difficult to know where to draw the line. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Program

 

The article, “Dealing with a Loved One’s Addiction” from Island Now, looks at some important aspects of dealing with a loved one who is facing addiction.  The article states,

“Addiction can be a challenging condition to deal with, especially when it concerns a loved one. The addiction process is gradual, so family members or friends rarely recognize it till it’s too late. In most cases, they subconsciously adapt to these changes till the addicted individual begins to exhibit extreme behaviors.”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Consulting program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and open to qualified professionals seeking a four year certification in Substance Abuse Counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Training Article on Contingency Management

Behavioral rewards to change bad behavior is a common concept.  Parents reward children to do chores or do good things to reinforce the good behavior with reward.  Contingency Management in addiction looks at the same principle.  In some cases, with stimulants and meth, it has been successful, with others, such as opioids it has not had as much success.  Sometimes, rewards have been misused if they have monetary value.  Still despite this, when combined with other therapies, it can prove useful.

Contingency Management rewards good behavior during addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program

 

The article, “This Addiction Treatment Works. Why Is It So Underused?” by Abby Goodnough looks at this way of rewarding.  She states,

“The treatment is called contingency management, because the rewards are contingent on staying abstinent. A number of clinical trials have found it highly effective in getting people addicted to stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine to stay in treatment and to stop using the drugs. But outside the research arena and the Department of Veterans Affairs, where Mr. Kelty is a patient, it is nearly impossible to find programs that offer such treatment — even as overdose deaths involving meth, in particular, have soared.”

To review the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program and see if it meets your academic and professional goals.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program Article on Causes of Addiction

Did you ever wonder why one person can drink and even binge drink during their college years and never emerge addicted , while another person may become addicted to alcohol his or her whole life?  It is a multi faceted issue that does not have just one answer but multiple issues that can come together and form the scary picture of addiction.

Many factors can lead one to addiction. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program and see if it matches your professional and academic requirements

 

The article, “Why do some people become addicted to drugs while others do not?”  by Pam Rush takes a closer look at the biological, personal, and environmental issues that can lead to addiction. She states,

“No single factor can predict whether a person will become addicted to drugs. A combination of genetic, environmental, and developmental factors influences risk for addiction. The more risk factors a person has, the greater the chance that taking drugs can lead to addiction. Environmental, genetic, and developmental factors may include:”

To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program to see if it meets your academic and professional goals.  The program is online and open to qualified professionals seeking certification in Substance Abuse and Addiction counseling.

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Training Article on Telemedicine and Addiction Help

Telemedicine is becoming more prominent and will be here to stay since the pandemic.  It is being applied to reach the sick as well those in emotional need.  Substance abuse and addiction are also big uses of telemedicine.  Unfortunately, the technology is still ahead of many regulations.  Patients need help not red tape preventing healthcare providers the ability to help the addicted.

Those suffering from addiction are benefiting from telemedicine during the pandemic. Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program

 

The article, “Telemedicine and addiction recovery: A new way forward?” by Mary Tolan looks at the importance of telemedicine in helping individuals who face addiction and how to make it more efficient.  She states,

“Will the future of addiction recovery take place on video conference screens and emailed notes? Even a few months ago, treating addiction patients remotely might seem like a stretch at first listen — metaphorically, geographically, and medicinally. But now, as the Covid-19 crisis puts pressure on outpatient providers to facilitate remote care, some addiction professionals have set aside that skepticism and opened digital care channels, willing to explore any avenue that might lead their patients out of the opioid epidemic’s grip and into a healthy future. ”

Covid19 has changed the landscape of healthcare forever and modern technology will continue to play a vital role.  Now it is just a matter of the regulations and laws to catch up to the new technology.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Training Program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

 

 

 

 

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Addiction and Self Isolation

Addiction is a powerful thing even during normal times.  Isolation and quarantine can make addiction even harder.  Lack of social support, counseling and being around other people can make one turn towards addicting things.  Instead of connection, the person returns to addiction.

Self isolation is very difficult when dealing with addiction. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Program to learn how to become certified

 

The article, “Managing Addiction Recovery During Self-Isolation” from Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials takes a closer look how one can manage addiction during self-isolation.  The article states,

Managing addiction recovery can be difficult at any time but the recent coronavirus pandemic has made doing so even harder. Besides affecting in-person meetings and appointments, current quarantine rules have also put extra strain on those struggling with recovery. But that doesn’t mean any efforts are hopeless. Understanding what triggers can add stress to your situation can make dealing with current circumstances easier. And it’s also important to know how many ways you can still receive the support you need.

To read the entire article, please click here

Identifying triggers is a key part of managing oneself during self isolation.  Being able to ward off the feelings of need is also key.  This is easier said then done but the article above hopes to give a few ways to make it less difficult.  If you would like to become certified in Substance Abuse Counseling and would like to help others, please review AIHCP’s program and see if it matches your academic and professional goals.

Addiction Counseling Training Program Article on When Is One Too Much?

It is a matter of luck for many that some may drink alcohol and never become addicted.  For many it is a matter of a genetic predisposition.  Some can simply put down a drink and never have one again without any physical symptoms.  Others while not physically addicted can become mentally addicted through habit and the ability to walk away is likened to walking away from a bad habit.  When we see individuals, physically addicted or not, drink, we still can determine if one drink is too much or not.  One does not need to be addicted to misuse a drug, but for some, when can we truly state it is an addiction?

What separates a fun night out from addictive behavior? Please also review our Addiction Counseling Training Program

 

Like a computer game, or gambling, drugs can be addictive to our behavior, beyond just the physical addiction.  One out of habit needs to drink.  Whether its always after work, or to go to a night club, if one cannot abstain from a drink, then it is a sign of some dependency, either physically, mentally, or out of bad habit. For some it takes less time, but those who face greater addictions, it can be a big issue.

Hence defining what is an addiction for one and not the other can be difficult.  Many people exist in the state of need but only need in certain situations.  This still can pose an issue, even if it is only here and there.  It is also an issue, if one is not enough.

The article, “Alcohol Use: When is it an Addiction?” from the South Florida Reporter states,

“The problem starts when we’re unable to control our urge to drink, even if it doesn’t present a threat to our social life, work, or health status. This is where we need to make a clear distinction between alcohol use, abuse, and alcoholism, which are related but not the same issues.  Alcohol abuse is a disorder when a person can’t stop drinking even if it causes problems at home or at work. Alcohol abusers are prone to drinking and driving, even if they are aware of the dangers of such behavior.”

While there are so many clear cut definitions of alcohol abuse and addiction, it is sometimes the more subtle ones that tilt between social norm and addiction.  To read the entire article, please click here

Please also review our Addiction Counseling Training Program.  The online and independent study program and help train professionals to help others face substance abuse and addictive behavior.

Substance Abuse Counseling Certification Article on Alcohol and the Family

Alcohol and addiction can destroy families.  It can drive spouses apart, lead to neglect, affairs, abuse and domestic violence.  It is important to preserve families.  Those who face addiction need to take the correct steps to protect their family from despair and brokenness. Substance abuse counseling and addiction counseling is sometimes the best way to learn how to cope with the addiction

Substance abuse can divide families. Please also review our Substance Abuse Counseling Certification

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Counselors and others who are certified in Substance Abuse Counseling can help others find the solutions they need.  Substance Abuse counselors can sometimes be certified but in most cases are licensed counselors who also earned the additional certification.  Licensed counselors with a certification can even be more of a help than those who are only certified in the field, such as pastors, or healthcare providers.

The article, “Alcoholism: A Family Disease – How Alcohol Addiction Affects Families” from WRCB TV and their Health section states,

“Alcohol use disorder (AUD), commonly called alcoholism, is often called a “family disease” because it impacts more people than just the individual with alcohol addiction. Addiction happens in all types of families, and its emotional side effects are felt by spouses, children, and other loved ones”

To read the entire article please click here

Please also review AIHCP’s Substance Abuse Counseling Certification and see if it meets your academic and professional standards.